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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 16: events at home.—Letters of friends.—December, 1837, to March, 1839.—Age 26-28. (search)
a renewal at some future day. Then we shall have the extra pleasure of hearing your feats of valor and adventure. Your anticipations, you say, great as they were, were fully realized on landing in France. I think you peculiarly fitted to enjoy travelling. All is novelty and freshness, and with your energy, ardor, and untiring perseverance no information will be left vnattained, and no rational pleasure unsought. You have my best wishes that nothing may occur to mar this enjoyment. Dr. Palfrey wrote, Sept. 25:— You are, I will not say an enviable, but certainly a very fortunate, man; and are thus another illustration of the connection between good luck and good conduct. Governor Everett wrote, May 20, 1839:— I rejoice, my dear Sir, to hear from all quarters, public and private, of your great success abroad. I consider the country as under obligations to you for the favorable impression of our means of education and our institutions generally, which must be prod
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
. &c.: but my visit was quite hurried, as I was obliged by my engagements to hasten back to town. We have heard of the dreadful loss of the packets. I had written several letters, which were on board those ill-fated ships, and which will perhaps never reach their destination. To you I had written a very long letter,—partly dated, I think, from Milton Park, Letter not lost, ante, Vol. II. p. 31. and giving an account of my adventures in fox-hunting with Lord Fitzwilliam; one also to Dr. Palfrey, enclosing a letter interesting to him, which I received from Sir David Brewster; others to Longfellow, to Cleveland, to Mrs. Ticknor, to Mr. Fletcher, and to my mother. I wish you would do me the favor to let me know the fate of these letters. The article on Horace, in the last number but one of the Quarterly Review, Oct. 1838, Vol. LXII. pp. 287-332, Life and Writings of Horace. The article, enlarged and revised, became the Life of Horace, prefixed to Milman's exquisite edition
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, London, Jan. 12. (search)
. &c.: but my visit was quite hurried, as I was obliged by my engagements to hasten back to town. We have heard of the dreadful loss of the packets. I had written several letters, which were on board those ill-fated ships, and which will perhaps never reach their destination. To you I had written a very long letter,—partly dated, I think, from Milton Park, Letter not lost, ante, Vol. II. p. 31. and giving an account of my adventures in fox-hunting with Lord Fitzwilliam; one also to Dr. Palfrey, enclosing a letter interesting to him, which I received from Sir David Brewster; others to Longfellow, to Cleveland, to Mrs. Ticknor, to Mr. Fletcher, and to my mother. I wish you would do me the favor to let me know the fate of these letters. The article on Horace, in the last number but one of the Quarterly Review, Oct. 1838, Vol. LXII. pp. 287-332, Life and Writings of Horace. The article, enlarged and revised, became the Life of Horace, prefixed to Milman's exquisite edition
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 23: return to his profession.—1840-41.—Age, 29-30. (search)
arents, and children at a Thanksgiving dinner at four o'clock. Blind-man's-buff was played in the evening, in which Sumner took part. He was always among the guests when the historian gathered about him the scholars of the day,—Sparks, Ticknor, Palfrey, Bancroft, Felton, Longfellow, and Hillard. Mr. Everett left for Europe in the summer of 1840. Mr. Prescott, while a conservative in politics, was always catholic in his friendships; and his relations with Sumner were never affected by the di Elba, has come . . . . Sparks has just returned, laden with the fruits of his researches in the public archives of London and Paris. I dined in company with him yesterday at Prescott's. There were Ticknor, William H. Gardiner, Samuel A. Eliot, Palfrey, Longfellow, Felton, and Hillard,—a goodly fellowship. The conversation was agreeable. I envy you six months in Germany. I was not there long enough to learn the language as I wished. Another six months would make me master of it and of its
April 29. Your letter to Mary, with its pleasant sketch of Elba, has come . . . . Sparks has just returned, laden with the fruits of his researches in the public archives of London and Paris. I dined in company with him yesterday at Prescott's. There were Ticknor, William H. Gardiner, Samuel A. Eliot, Palfrey, Longfellow, Felton, and Hillard,—a goodly fellowship. The conversation was agreeable. I envy you six months in Germany. I was not there long enough to learn the language as I wished. Another six months would make me master of it and of its literature . . . . Ever affectionately yours, Charle
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 27: services for education.—prison discipline.—Correspondence.— January to July, 1845.—age, 34. (search)
s to all the persons to whom the application was made. The manufacturing companies have subscribed one thousand dollars each. Of course, the case was submitted to the directors of these companies. None of the L's subscribed, though the A's have. The Appletons and Lawrences. It is understood that the New York portion is to be made up by larger sums. It is needless to say that the Legislature could have had no suspicions of any such arrangement; and our good Secretary of State Dr. John G. Palfrey. says that, if he were a member of the House, he would move for power to send for persons and papers. You will read Mr. Webster's Address to the People of the United States, promulgated by the anti-Texas Convention. It is an able paper, which will lift our public sentiment to a new platform of Anti-slavery. The debates in the Convention were most interesting. I never heard Garrison before. He spoke with natural eloquence. Hillard spoke exquisitely. His words descended in a go
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 28: the city Oration,—the true grandeur of nations.—an argument against war.—July 4, 1845.—Age 34. (search)
est way to avoid an unseemly explosion,—meeting it at the same time with the humor of which he was always master. Dr. John G. Palfrey, who answered to a toast in honor of the Commonwealth, of which he was then the Secretary, was the first to speak.mes necessary,–though admitting Peace to have her greater victories. After the dinner, one of Sumner's friends took Dr. Palfrey to task for leading off the assault on the oration; but he insisted that he took, in his measured and partial dissent, the safest course for Sumner's friends to pursue, with the view to prevent an unpleasant scene. Dr. Palfrey had an incisive style and manner, and probably his dissent seemed at the time more marked than it now appears in the brief record of the daly, betraying no sensitiveness or even surprise at what was said. If he was at all disturbed, it was by the speech of Dr. Palfrey, from whom, on account of kindred studies and friendly associations, he may have expected support; but both as to him