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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Resaca De la Palma or search for Resaca De la Palma in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Battles. (search)
ahoo SwampNov. 17, 18, and 21, Okeechobee LakeDec. 25, 1837 CarloosahatcheeJuly 23, 1839 Fort KingApril 28, 1840 Near Fort BrookeMar. 2, 1841 Big HammockApril 19, 1842 War against Mexico. Fort BrownMay 3, 1846 Palo AltoMay 8, 1846 Resaca de la PalmaMay 9, 1846 Sonoma and Sonoma PassJune 15, 1846 MontereySept. 21-23, 1846 BracetaDec. 25, 1846 San GabrielJan. 8, 1847 The MesaJan. 9, 1847 EncarnacionJan. 23, 1847 Buena VistaFeb. 22 and 23, ChihuahuaFeb. 28, 1847 Vera Cruz (Surreahoo SwampNov. 17, 18, and 21, Okeechobee LakeDec. 25, 1837 CarloosahatcheeJuly 23, 1839 Fort KingApril 28, 1840 Near Fort BrookeMar. 2, 1841 Big HammockApril 19, 1842 War against Mexico. Fort BrownMay 3, 1846 Palo AltoMay 8, 1846 Resaca de la PalmaMay 9, 1846 Sonoma and Sonoma PassJune 15, 1846 MontereySept. 21-23, 1846 BracetaDec. 25, 1846 San GabrielJan. 8, 1847 The MesaJan. 9, 1847 EncarnacionJan. 23, 1847 Buena VistaFeb. 22 and 23, ChihuahuaFeb. 28, 1847 Vera Cruz (Surre
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Craig, Henry Knox 1791-1868 (search)
Craig, Henry Knox 1791-1868 Military officer; born in Pittsburg, Pa., March 7, 1791; entered the army as a lieutenant of artillery in 1812; took part in the occupation of Fort George, and the assault at Stony Creek, Canada; was chief of ordnance of the Army of Occupation in Mexico in 1847, and distinguished himself in the battles of Palo Alto, Resaca de la Palma, and Monterey; was chief of the ordnance bureau at Washington in 1851-61; and was retired in 1863. He died in Washington, D. C., Dec. 7, 1868.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Palo Alto, battle of (search)
Texas, about 8 miles northeast of Matamoras, Mexico, flanked by ponds and beautified by tall trees (which gave it its name), General Taylor, marching with less than 2,300 men from Point Isabel towards Fort Brown, encountered about 6,000 Mexicans, led by General Arista, in 1846. At a little past noon a furious battle was begun with artillery by the Mexicans and a cavalry attack with the lance. The Mexicans were forced back, and, after a contest of about five hours, they retreated to Resaca de la Palma and encamped. They fled in great disorder, having lost in the engagement 100 men killed and wounded. The Americans lost fifty-three men. During the engagement Major Ringgold, commander of the American Flying Artillery, which did terrible work in the ranks of the Mexicans, was mortally wounded by a small cannonball that passed through both thighs and through his horse. Rider and horse both fell to the ground. The latter was dead; the major died at Point Isabel four days afterwards.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Resaca de la Palma, battle of (search)
Resaca de la Palma, battle of At 2 A. M. on May 9, 1846, the little army of General Taylor, which had fought the Mexicans the day before at Palo Alto (q. v.), were awakened from their slumbers on the battle-field to resume their march for Fort Brown. The cautious leader prepared for attack on the way, for the smitten foe had rallied. He saw no traces of them until towards evening, when, as the Americans emerged from a dense thicket, the Mexicans were discovered strongly posted in battle order in a broad ravine about 4 feet deep and 200 feet wide, the dry bed of a series of pools, skirted with palmetto-trees, and called Resaca de la Palma. Within that natural trench the Mexicans had planted a battery that swept the road over which the Americans were approaching. Taylor pressed forward, and, after some severe skirmishing, in which a part of his army was engaged, he ordered Captain May, leader of dragoons, to charge upon the battery. Rising in his stirrups, May called out to his
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
ct. 13, 1845 Twenty-ninth Congress, first session, assembles......Dec. 1, 1845 Texas admitted as the twenty-eighth State......Dec. 29, 1845 American army of occupation, Gen. Zachary Taylor, 3,500 strong, reaches the Rio Grande, and takes post opposite Matamoras......March 28, 1846 Hostilities begun between Mexico and the United States; a small force of United States troops captured by the Mexicans......April 25, 1846 Battle of Palo Alto......May 8, 1846 Battle of Resaca de la Palma......May 9, 1846 President Polk, by special message to Congress, announces that war exists by the act of Mexico......May 11, 1846 Congress authorizes the President to raise 50,000 men and $10,000,000 for the war......May 13, 1846 Treaty with Great Britain signed, establishing the boundaries west of the Rocky Mountains on the 49th parallel of N. lat., and thus settling the Oregon difficulty ......June 15, 1846 Com. John D. Sloat, of the Pacific Squadron, occupies Monterey, Cal.
ich is ratified by the people, 4,174 to 312......Oct. 13, 1845 Texas admitted into the Union by act approved......Dec. 29, 1845 Charles A. Wickliffe sent on a secret mission to Texas in the interest of an nexation, by President Polk......1845 First State legislature convenes at Austin......Feb. 16, 1846 J. P. Henderson inaugurated first governor of the State......Feb. 19, 1846 Fort Brown at Brownsville established......March 28, 1846 Battle of Palo Alto, May 8, and of Resaca de la Palma......May 9, 1846 Act of congress sets apart one-tenth of the general revenues of the State for educational purposes......May 13, 1846 Baylor University at Waco chartered 1845, and opened......1846 Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo concluded Feb. 2; ratification exchanged at Queretaro, May 30, and proclaimed......July 4, 1848 Austin city chosen as the seat of government for twenty years by vote of the people......1850 Texas formally accepts the boundary designated by the boun