Your search returned 22 results in 12 document sections:

1 2
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The last Confederate surrender. (search)
lf of their convention. Whereupon an interview was arranged between us to determine a course of action, and a place selected ten miles north of Mobile, near the railway. Accompanied by a staff officer, Colonel William M. Levy (now a member of Congress from Louisiana), and making use of a hand car, I reached the appointed spot, and found General Canby with a large escort, and many staff and other officers. Among these I recognized some old friends, notably General Canby himself and Admiral James Palmer. All extended cordial greetings. A few moments of private conversation with Canby led to the establishment of a truce, to await further intelligence from the North. Forty-eight hours notice was to be given by the party desiring to terminate the truce. We then joined the throng of officers, and although every one present felt a deep conviction that the last hour of the sad struggle approached, no allusion was made to it. Subjects awakening memories of the past, when all were sons o
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), How Jefferson Davis was overtaken. (search)
ington, just within the northeastern boundary of Georgia, they had long since learned the hopelessness of further resistance, and now began to despair even of successful flight. A division of National cavalry, under Stoneman, and a brigade under Palmer, had already burst from the mountains of North Carolina, and were in hot pursuit; while rumors reached him of another mounted force, sweeping destructively through Alabama and Georgia, cutting off, by its wide extended march, the only route to th there and Tallahassee, Florida, was scouting the country to the north and eastward. We also had rail and telegraphic communication from my headquarters at Macon with Atlanta, Augusta, West Point, Milledgeville, Albany and Eufaula, and, finally, Palmer, in hot haste, was approaching the line of the Savannah from South Carolina with one brigade. By inspecting the map for a moment it will be seen that our troops, amounting to fifteen thousand horsemen, were occupying a well defined and almost co
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The last Confederate surrender. (search)
f of their convention. Whereupon, an interview was arranged between us to determine a course of action, and a place selected ten miles north of Mobile, near the railway. Accompanied by a staff officer, Colonel William M. Levy (now a member of Congress from Louisiana), and making use of a hand car, I reached the appointed spot, and found General Canby with a large escort, and many staff and other officers. Among these I recognized some old friends, notably General Canby himself and Admiral James Palmer. All extended cordial greetings. A few moments of private conversation with Canby led to the establishment of a truce, to await further intelligence from the North. Forty-eight hours notice was to be given by the party desiring to terminate the truce. We then joined the throng of officers, and although every one present felt a deep conviction that the last hour of the sad struggle approached, no allusion was made to it. Subjects, awakening memories of the past, when all were sons
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Major-General Carter L. Stevenson of the Tennessee campaign. (search)
ed. Until the opening of the battles around Nashville, nothing of interest transpired in my command, except the part taken by my skirmishers, commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel J. B. Bibb, Twenty-third Alabama, in a demonstration made by Lee's corps. The enemy's skirmishers were driven by a greatly inferior force from all of their entrenched positions. My skirmishers were handsomely handled, and did their work with a dash and gallantry which deserve praise. Just before this demonstration, Palmer's brigade (consolidated from Brown's and Reynold's old brigades), was detached and ordered to report to Major-General N. B. Forrest in front of Murfreesboroa. It remained so detached from the division until it reached Bear creak, on this side of Barton's station. On the 15th of December the battle in front of Nashville opened. Except some unimportant skirmishing, my division took no part in that day's fight; although its position was frequently shifted, and the line greatly attenuated,
hotorelief, and Woodburytype. 2. The photographic process is also used for obtaining a picture upon a plate or block for subsequent engraving. The value of the process consists in the quickness and the fidelity of the picture. In some cases it is a substitute for an offset or tracing process, in other cases it affords a means of obtaining a picture from nature or from a model. In this relation occurred one of the most remarkable patents on record for what it failed to do; that of James Palmer, England, No. 13,736, of August 23, 1851. The object was to use gelatine as a vehicle for receiving delineations of objects. 1. The sheet of gelatine was placed in a frame, in the manner of a pane of glass, between the eye and the object, and the outline of the object was traced upon it. Various methods of reducing, enlarging, multiplying, and transferring are thus obtained. 2. The sheet was treated with chemicals, especially alum, to render it insoluble in water, in order that wet pap
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union, Company H. (search)
arles miller, Cambridgeport, 30, s; painter. Oct. 22, 1862. M. O Sept. 28, 1865. Charles Monroe. Died Aug. 2, 1863, New Orleans, La. Absalom Morrill, St. John, N. S., 22, s; farmer. Oct. 1, 1862. Disch. disa. Feb. 20, 1863. James Noonan, Charlestown, 21, m; hostler. Sept. 24, 1862. Wounded Sept. 19, 1864. Prisoner of war, October 19, 1864. Disch. May 20, 1865. Unof. Christian Oberlander, Boston, 39, in; cook. Sept. 22, 1862. Deserted Nov. 19, 1862, Jamaica L. I. James Palmer, Blackstone, 24; laborer. Disch. disa. Feb. 20, 1863. James Pearson, Boston, 27. m; tailor. Sept. 24, 1862. Disch. disa. March 13, 1863. Unof. William Pethie, Worcester, 21, s; hostler. Sept. 25, 1862. Disch. May 20, 1865. Unof. Samuel W. Prescott, Lowell, 40, n; laborer. Oct. 18, 1862. Disch. disa. Feb. 20, 1863. Patrick Riley, Boston, 35, m; laborer. Sept 9, 1862. Disch. disa. Jan. 18 1864. Unof. Solomon Shumway, Belchertown, 31, m; clerk. Jan. 5, 1864. Disc
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: (search)
is advance fell the noble-hearted Governor Means, at the head of the Seventeenth; the accomplished and gallant Glover, at the head of Hagood's First; the brave Gadberry, leading the Eighteenth; the dashing Moore, commanding the Second rifles; the heroic Palmer, urging the Holcombe legion to the charge, and Henry Stevens, aide to Col. P. F. Stevens, falling with five wounds. A single shell bursting in front of Company K, Palmetto sharpshooters, killed five young men—Theodotus L. Capers, James Palmer, Whiteford Smith, Bearden and McSwain—graduates and undergraduates of college, the very best Carolina could give for her cause. It is particularly noted, that these were representative young men, sons of men of prominence in the church and in the State. Never did one shell destroy more of the beauty and promise of life, or carry more sorrow to human hearts. The Fifteenth South Carolina operated on the extreme right in support of cavalry, and is reported as losing 21 in killed and wo
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Paroles of the Army of Northern Virginia. (search)
Hullendes, D. V. Hullendes, Joseph Jackson, H. Johnston, A. J. McCarter, Private J. T. Pursely, J. S. Roberts, N. Y. Roberts, J. H. Wallace, P. Watterson, Thos. Weaver, W. Wells. Co. H. Sergeant T. N. Kelly, T. R. Harmon. A. F. Kendrick, W. F. Comer, Private E. Bailey, N. C. Bally, J. G. Bently, J. P. Briant, Benj. Comer, P. J. Davis, Private Wm. Going, Jeff. Garner, Q. Gregory, G. L. Harmon, E. Long, B. R. S. Long, J. E. Lindsay, J. Millwood, A. Orr, J. Palmer, Private C. C. Davis, J. C. Davis, Robt. Davis, L. J. Dabbs, R. M. Foster, Private N. Palmer, H. B. Smith, J. B. Tracy, F. M. Tracy, Allen Vinson. Co. I. Sergeant G. M. Epting, G. C. Moore, Joseph Price, Corporal R. F. Brown, Private J. S. Amos, W. J. Bryant, W. V. Cooksey, F. Harvy, T. Huskey, C. C. Jarrett, J. M. Johnson, Private A. J. Kinneth, M. C. Lovelace, T. J. McAbee, B. T. Price, J. U. Porter, W. B. Paris, H. J. Pettit, D. Scruggs, J. E. Scrug
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Semmes' Georgia Brigade. (search)
Wm. W. Martin, Lewis Philips. Co. C. Private George S. Rusmissell, John W. Gibson, Co. D. Sergeant Frederick Cupp, Samuel D. Gilmore, Corporal Robert P. G. Shafer, Private John A. J. Jenkins, John P. Miller, Private Peter Reese, John Sherman. Private Benjamin F. Moore, Patrick H. Riley, Wm. J. Self, James H. Wells, Christopher C. Wells. Co. F. Musician Dan'l L. Bush, Private Wm. S. Stover. Co. G. Sergeant Alex. S. Coffman, Private Henry G. Biby, Private James Palmer, Jacob Shiry. Co. H. Private Frederick C. Ott, James Templeton, Private James T. Black. Co. I. Private James W. Brown, Private Jacob M. Kesterson, Wm. Christopher, Jacob W. Rosen, Wm. T. Holbert, Wm. H. Sheets, Wm. G. Kesterson, Samuel Weaver. Co. K. Private Harrison G. Keyser. I certify, on honor, that of the above roll, but fourteen were armed on the 9th of April, 1865. [53] S. W. Paxton, Capt. Commanding Regiment. Fifty-eighth Virginia Regiment
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
their Convention. Whereupon an interview was arranged between us to determine a course of action, and a place selected ten miles north of Mobile, near the railway. Accompanied by a staff officer, Colonel Wm. M. Levy (afterwards a member of Congress from Louisiana), and making use of a hand-car, I reached the appointed spot, and found General Canby, with a large escort and many staff and other officers. Among these I recognized some old friends, notably General Canby, himself, and General James Palmer. All extended cordial greeting. A few moments of private conversation with Canby led to the establishment of a truce, to await further intelligence from the North. Forty-eight hours notice was to be given by the party desiring to terminate the truce. We then joined the throng of officers, and although every one present felt a deep conviction that the last hour of the sad struggle approached, no allusion was made to it. Subjects awakening memories of the past, when all were son
1 2