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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 26, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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such been intended. On the arrival of the cars and the appearance on the platform of the Baltimore Republican committee, they were received with groans and hootings. A rush was made at William E. Beale and Francis S. Corkran, but they were protected by the police, and neither of them were injured further than knocking their hats over their eyes. The following was the committee: William G. Snethen, chairman; Judge William L. Marshall, L. Blumenberg, of Gaystreet; William E. Beale. Hon. Judge Palmer, of Frederick, was with the party. Mrs. Lincoln and her three sons proceeded to the residence of Col. John S. Gittings, president of the Northern Central railway, at Mount Vernon Square, leaving accepted an invitation tendered to them on their way to this city, so as to relieve them from the crowd and excitement. They left the cars, we learn, at the junction of Charles-street, where Mr. Gittings's carriage was in waiting for them, and were in a few minutes enjoying the quiet of his
do., Collins. Fourth Company.--Captain, B. F. Eshleman; 1st Lieutenant., Jos. Norcom; 2d Lieutenant, Harry A. Battles; 2d Sergeant, W. J. Behan; 3d do., G. E. Apps; 4th do., J. D. Reynolds; 1st Corporal, George Wood; 2d do., J. W. Dearn. Dr. Palmer's Sermon to the Washington Artillery. The following is a report of the eloquent and patriotic exhortation of Dr. Palmer to the Washington Artillery, delivered from the portico of the City Hall to the troops just before marching to the depot,Dr. Palmer to the Washington Artillery, delivered from the portico of the City Hall to the troops just before marching to the depot, on their departure for the scene of war in Virginia. Besides the military, there were not less than five thousand citizens present on this interesting occasion: Gentlemen of the Washington Artillery: At the sound of the bugle you are here, within one short hour to bid adieu to cherished homes, and soon to encounter the perils of battle on a distant field. It is fitting that here, in the heart of this great city — here, beneath the shadow of this Hall, over which floats the flag of Lo
Doc. 238.-the Third Maine Regiment. The Third Maine Regiment numbers 1,010 men. They are fully armed and equipped, bringing with them their tents and baggage, and forty horses furnished by the State. They are men accustomed to muscular pursuits, and are of fine size for hard service. The following is the list of the officers: Colonel, Oliver O. Howard; Lieutenant-Colonel, I. M. Tucker; Major, H. G. Staples; Adjutant, Edward Burt; Assistant Surgeon, Dr. J. Palmer; Chaplain, Rev. Dr. Church; Quartermaster, W. D. Haley; Quartermaster-Sergeant John S. Smith; Hospital Steward, F. H. Getchell; Sergeant-Major, James H. Plasted. Co. A--Captain, Reuben Sawyer; First Lieutenant, John Wiggin. Co. B--Captain, E. A. Batchelder; First Lieutenant, Albert B. Hall; Second Lieutenant, Edward Bird. Co. C--Captain, William Jarvis; First Lieutenant, James Colson; Second Lieutenant, George Andrew. Co. D--Captain, Charles L. Sampson; First Lieutenant, William H. Watson; Second Lieutenant, Warran
arrival of the cars and the appearance on the platform of the Baltimore Republican Committee, they were received with groans and hootings. A rush was made at William E. Beale and Francis S. Corkran, but they were protected by the police, and neither of them were injured further than knocking their hats over their eyes. The following was the Committee: William G. Snethen, Chairman; Judge Wm. L. Marshall, L. Blumenberg, of Gay street; James E. Bishop, Wm. E. Gleeson, and Wm. E. Beale. Hon. Judge Palmer, of Frederick, was with the party. Mrs. Lincoln and her three sons proceeded to the residence of Colonel John S. Gittings, President of the Northern Central Railway, at Mount Vernon Square, having accepted an invitation tendered to them on their way to this city, so as to relieve them from the crowd and the excitement. They left the cars, we learn, at the junction of Charles street, where Mr. Gittings' carriage was in waiting for them, and were in a few minutes enjoying the quiet