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Joseph LeeBoston207 66 SloopOrionGeorge Fuller'sGeorge FullerE. CaryBoston100 671818ShipJavaT. Magoun'sT. MagounBenjamin RichBoston295.13 68 BrigArabT. Magoun'sT. MagounJ. Blake & T. MagounBoston & Medford225.62 69 ShipMercuryT. Magoun'sT. MagounNorwood & NicholsBoston304.66 70 BrigJonesT. Magoun'sT. MagounGeo. G. Jones & T. MagounBoston & Medford271.86 71 BrigGeorgeGeorge Fuller'sGeorge FullerJohn PrattBoston260 72 BrigArcherSprague & James'sSprague & JamesJoseph LeeBoston261 73 BrigPalmerSprague & James'sSprague & JamesJoseph LeeBoston277 741819BrigHalcyonT. Magoun'sT. MagounL. Cunningham & Co.Boston253.07 75 BrigSicilyT. Magoun'sT. MagounJoshua BlakeBoston163.46 76 SloopTruthSprague & James'sSprague & JamesJ. LambartTruro36 771820BrigTamahourelaune These brigs were put together; then taken to pieces and sent to the Sandwich Islands, on board the Thaddeus, commanded by Capt. A. Blanchard, of Medford.T. Magoun'sT. MagounJosiah MarshallBoston162.63 78 BrigJones Th
sten Bratcher, dying lately at Mr. Cradock's plantation, was viewed before his burial by divers persons. The jury's verdict: We find that the strokes given by Walter Palmer were occasionally the means of the death of Austen Bratcher; and so to be manslaughter. Palmer was bound over to be tried at Boston for this death; and, on thPalmer was bound over to be tried at Boston for this death; and, on the 9th of November, the jury bring in a verdict of Not guilty. At a court held at Watertown, March 8, 1631, Ordered that Thomas Fox, servant of Mr. Cradock, shall be whipped for uttering malicious and scandalous speeches, whereby he sought to traduce the court, as if they had taken some bribe in the business concerning Walter PaWalter Palmer. This Thomas Fox was fined four times, and seems to have been possessed by the very demon of mischief. He left the plantation without his benediction. June 14, 1631: At this court, one Philip Radcliff, a servant of Mr. Cradock, being convict, ore tenus, of most foul, scandalous invectives against our churches and governme
rn, b. Mar. 10, 1658.  4Benjamin, b. Dec. 30, 1661. 1-2William Reeves m. Elizabeth Collins, Mar. 14, 1669, and had--  2-5John.  6Cochran.  7Elizabeth. 2-6COCHRAN Reeves m., 1st, Judith----; 2d, Elizabeth Robinson, July 17, 1723; and had--  6-8Samuel, b. Jan., 1708; d. Oct. 9, 1791.  9William, b. Dec., 1710.  10Susanna, b. Mar., 1713; m. John Clough.  11Elizabeth, b. Oct., 1715; m.----Holman.  12Nathaniel, b. m. Mercy Dudley.  13Jacob, b. Aug., 1720.  14Mary, b. July, 1724; m.----Palmer.  15John, b. Feb., 1725.  16Benjamin, b. 1730. 6-8Samuel Reeves m. Elizabeth----, 1733, who d. Apr. 23, 1759, aged 51. He d. Oct. 9, 1791, and had--  8-16a.Elizabeth, b. 1734; m. Isaac Warren, Oct. 3, 1751.  b.Judith, b. 1735; m. Joseph Albree, Dec. 23, 1756.  c.Hannah, b. 1738; d., unm., Feb. 26, 1791.  d.Thomas, b. 1741; d., Feb. 12, 1755. 6-13Jacob Reeves m. Abigail Ferguson; lived some time at Roxbury, and moved thence to Wayland. He had--  13-17Nathaniel, b. Mar. 6
r, 205. Mayhew, 36. Maverick, 2. McClure, 49. Medford a Town, 119. Melvin, 44. Methodist Society, 270. Michelson, 42. Middlesex Canal, 295. Mills, 392. Moore, 36. Mystic Church, 273. Mystic River, 6. Name, 1. Newell, 36, 44. Norton, 74. Nowell, 3, 7, 9, 14, 37, 43. Noyes, 36, 97, 121. Nutting, 531. Oakes, 36. Oldham family, 531. Oldham, 89, 100. Oliver, 538, 570. One Hundred Laws, 101. Osgood, 236, 240, 531. Oysters, 387. Palmer, 37. Parker, 51, 52, 531. Patch family, 532. Paterson, 533. Patten family, 533. Pauperism, 441. Peirce family, 533. Pemberton, 36. Pepperrell, 538. Perkins, 534. Perry, 534. Physicians, 302. Pierpont, 262, 312. Polly, 151, 534. Ponds, 5. Population, 451. Post Office, 421. Porter family, 534. Porter, 36, 49, 51, 52, 211, 309. Pounds, 449. Prices Current, 400. Pritchard, 36. Productions, 12. Putnam, 151, 306. Public Building
He was prob. the same who. according to Savage, was in Chs., freeman 1645, and d. 19 Mar. 1673, a. 65; his w. Mary d. 25 Jan. 1696, a. 84. Fox, Thomas, was prob. the freeman named 1638, and may have been the same whose name is found in the Colony Records, 8 Mar. 1630-31; Ordered, That Tho. Foxe, servant to Mr. Cradocke, shall be whipped for uttering malicious and scandalous speeches, whereby he sought to traduce the Court, as if they had taken some bribe in the business concerning Walter Palmer. He prob. resided a few years at Concord, for Mitchell says his son Jabez was baptized there, but was in his minority when his father joined this church. His w. Rebecca d. at Concord 11 May 1647. Before June 1649, he came to Camb. He m. Ellen, wid. of Percival Green, the marriage contract being dated 24 May 1650. She d. 27 May 1682, a. 82. Her death was occasioned by a fall she got on the floor, whereby she broke her thigh. (N. Russell's Diary, N. E. Gen. Reg., VII. 54.) Mr. Fox m
He was prob. the same who. according to Savage, was in Chs., freeman 1645, and d. 19 Mar. 1673, a. 65; his w. Mary d. 25 Jan. 1696, a. 84. Fox, Thomas, was prob. the freeman named 1638, and may have been the same whose name is found in the Colony Records, 8 Mar. 1630-31; Ordered, That Tho. Foxe, servant to Mr. Cradocke, shall be whipped for uttering malicious and scandalous speeches, whereby he sought to traduce the Court, as if they had taken some bribe in the business concerning Walter Palmer. He prob. resided a few years at Concord, for Mitchell says his son Jabez was baptized there, but was in his minority when his father joined this church. His w. Rebecca d. at Concord 11 May 1647. Before June 1649, he came to Camb. He m. Ellen, wid. of Percival Green, the marriage contract being dated 24 May 1650. She d. 27 May 1682, a. 82. Her death was occasioned by a fall she got on the floor, whereby she broke her thigh. (N. Russell's Diary, N. E. Gen. Reg., VII. 54.) Mr. Fox m
level; its approach on the south side of the river over the marsh was by means of a causeway. The town of Charlestown brought a suit against Governor Cradock's agent for obstructing the river with a bridge, to the hindrance of boats, and exacting toll for cattle that passed over the bridge, and appointed a committee to prosecute the suit, and also appointed parties to attend court as witnesses. Charlestown records say that on the 26th of the 10th month, 1638, It was ordered that Mr. Walter Palmer and Richard Sprague should follow the suit at the Quarter Court against Mr. Cradock's agent, for stopping up Mistick river with a bridge, to the hindrance of boats, and exacting toll (without any orders) of cattle that go over the bridge. George Buncker, Geo. Hutchinson, and James Hayden were appointed to be at the General Court next, to witness to the concerning of Mr. Cradock's bridge. No mention is made of this suit in the records of the General Court. In 1879, when the old
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 22., How did Medford get its name? (search)
we are asked, and an authoritative answer for publication is expected. Under such circumstances one naturally turns to official records and published history. The first mention of Medford is in the colony record of the General Court, under date of September 28, 1630, when 3£ was levied upon it for the support of military instructors. Under the same date a coroner's jury returned its verdict in the death of Austin Bratcher at Mr. Cradock's farm, which resulted in the indictment of Walter Palmer for manslaughter and his subsequent acquittal from the charge in November. But one of Cradock's servants held variant opinion and sought to traduce the court, and was sentenced to be whipped therefor, being the fifth in the colony to receive such sentence. Here we find Medford's entrance into the limelight of history. Mr. Cradock's farm was a tract of land a mile wide (approximately) and four miles along the riverside from Charlestown, which then extended some fifteen miles north-we
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 28.,
Medford Square
in the early days. (search)
member that the late James Hervey said, if we are to be historical we must tell the truth. Under date of September 23, 1630, we read that one Austin Bratcher, dying lately at Mr. Cradock's plantation, a jury found that the strokes given by Walter Palmer were accounted manslaughter. But two months later, Palmer (who was from Charlestown) was acquitted, not to the satisfaction of everybody, as one Thomas Fox was fined for saying the Court had been bribed. An unpleasant episode—Medford's entrPalmer (who was from Charlestown) was acquitted, not to the satisfaction of everybody, as one Thomas Fox was fined for saying the Court had been bribed. An unpleasant episode—Medford's entrance into the limelight of history. During the first ten years the fording place was used in crossing the river, unless a boat or raft served, but in 1639 the agent Davison had a bridge built a little way below. It was one hundred and fifty feet long, very narrow, and but little above the marshes that bordered the river. And very soon he found his good work had got him into trouble as his employer's farm was only on this side, and this structure, desirable as it was, was half in the adjoini