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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 5 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for William H. Palmer or search for William H. Palmer in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The old Texas brigade, [from the Richmond times, September 22, 1891.] (search)
ict, on the Confederate right, until May 6th, when he arrived in time to give much needed relief to the troops of A. P. Hill, who had been fighting steadily during this and the day previous. The battle-line of Ewell's corps extended across the old turnpike, which was about his centre, and on which was their heaviest fighting. A. P. Hill and Longstreet's troops marched down and occupied the Orange plank-road. The turnpike and plank-road each runs from Fredericksburg to Orange Courthouse. Palmer's old field on the turnpike and Tapp's old field on the Orange plank-road, the site of the memorial stone just erected, are about five miles apart, and were the centres of heaviest fighting in the battle of the Wilderness. Heroism and devotion to Lee. In commemoration of their heroism and devotion to General Lee shown by the Texas brigade this stone was erected. The scene, the memory of which we would thus perpetuate, is graphically described by Rev. J. William Jones in his Personal R
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), First burial of General Hill's remains. (search)
t 2 P. M., April 4, 1865, in the old Winston burying-ground, where it remained until removed to Hollywood several years later through the kind efforts of Colonel William H. Palmer and his army associates. My father (the late Thomas Hill, Jr., of Culpeper) and Colonel Henry Hill were brothers, and were first cousins and brothers-her indication of carrying out such a promise, save the purchase and beautifying of a section in Hollywood, and the removal of the body under the direction of Colonel Palmer and others of his staff and army associates to that beautiful city of the dead. I was not favorable to the second disturbance and removal of the General's eatly beloved by all who knew him, and whom the immortal Lee and Jackson honored by their confidence. The Captain Hill mentioned as having been detailed by Colonel Palmer to take charge of the General's remains and to take them to Coalfield for burial was perhaps Captain Frank T. Hill, a nephew and aide-de-camp to the General.