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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill) 7 1 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 3 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Alice Freeman Palmer or search for Alice Freeman Palmer in all documents.

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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 8: divers good causes 1890-1896; aet. 71-77 (search)
Russian Freedom; modelled on a similar society which, with Free Russia as its organ, was doing good work in England. The object of the American society was to aid by all moral and legal means the Russian patriots in their efforts to obtain for their country political freedom and self-government. Its circular was signed by Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Julia Ward Howe, John Greenleaf Whittier, James Russell Lowell, George Kennan, William Lloyd Garrison, Henry I. Bowditch, F. W. Bird, Alice Freeman Palmer, Charles G. Ames, Edward L. Pierce, Frank B. Sanborn, Annie Fields, E. Benjamin Andrews, Lillie B. Chace Wyman, Samuel L. Clemens, and Joseph H. Twitchell. James Russell Lowell, writing to Francis J. Garrison in 1891, says: Between mote and beam, I think this time Russia has the latter in her eye, though God knows we have motes enough in ours. So you may take my name even if it be in vain, as I think it will be. It was through this society that she made the acquaintance of Mme.
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 10: the last Roman winter 1897-1898; aet. 78 (search)
Spartali, the friend of Rossetti and Du Maurier, the idol of literary and artistic London. A warm friendship grew up between them. Together they frequented the antiquaries, gleaning small treasures of ancient lace and peasant jewels. I bought this by the Muse Stillman's advice : this explanation guaranteed the wisdom of purchasing the small rose diamond ring set in black enamel. December 9. Dined with Daisy Chanler. We met there one Brewster and Hendrik Anderson. After dinner came Palmer [son of Courtland] and his sister. He is a pianist of real power and charm — made me think of Paderewski, when I first heard him .... December 10. Drove past the Trevi Fountain and to the Coliseum, where we walked awhile. Ladies came to hear me talk about Women's Clubs. This talk, which I had rather dreaded to give, passed off pleasantly.... Most of the ladies present expressed the desire to have a small and select club of women in Rome. Maud volunteered to make the first effort, with
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 11: eighty years 1899-1900; aet. 80-81 (search)
pidemic of negrolynching, which roused deep indignation throughout the country. On May 20 the Journal records a wonderful meeting at Chickering Hall, called by the colored women of Boston, to protest against the lynching of negroes in the South. Mrs. Butler M. Wilson presided, an octoroon and a woman of education. Her opening address was excellent in spirit and in execution. A daughter of Mrs. Ruffin also wrote an excellent address: Mrs. Cheney's was very earnest and impressive. Alice Freeman Palmer spoke as I have never before heard her. My rather brief speech was much applauded, as were indeed all of the others. Mrs. Richard Hallowell was on the platform and introduced Mrs. Wilson. this brief speech brought upon her a shower of letters, mostly anonymous, from persons who saw only the anti-negro side of this matter, so dreadful in every aspect. These letters were often denunciatory, sometimes furious in tone, especially one addressed to Mrs. Howe, Negro Sympathizer, Bos
I, 75. Paddock, Mary, I, 197, 350. Paderewski, Ignace, II, 171, 210, 240. Page, Miss, II, 216. Page, T. N., II, 399. Pajarita, I, 323. Palestine, II, 42, 322. Paley's Moral Philosophy, I, 32. Palfrey, J. G., I, 207. Palmer, Mr., II, 240. Palmer, Alice Freeman, II, 187, 266. Palmer, Courtland, II, 240. Palmer, Mrs., Potter, II, 178, 181. Panama Canal, II, 50. Pansotti, Prof., II, 251. Papeterie, II, 52-54, 277, 385, 411, 413. Paris, France, I, 6, Palmer, Alice Freeman, II, 187, 266. Palmer, Courtland, II, 240. Palmer, Mrs., Potter, II, 178, 181. Panama Canal, II, 50. Pansotti, Prof., II, 251. Papeterie, II, 52-54, 277, 385, 411, 413. Paris, France, I, 6, 8, 97, 116, 133, 278, 279, 301, 308, 309, 315; II, 23-26, 66, 176. Park Street Church, I, 43. Parker, Theodore, I, 33, 87, 106, 107, 143, 151, 170, 172-76, 185, 186, 207, 285; II, 36, 108, 130, 154, 211, 247, 363, 411. Parker, Mrs., Theodore, I, 173, 175. Parker Fraternity, I, 218, 385; II, 127, 130, 131. Parkman, Dr., I, 132, 133. Parkman, Francis, I, 379; II, 54. Parliament of Religions, II, 178, 184. Parnell, C. S., II, 4, 5. Parnell, Delia, II, 4. Parnell, Fann