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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
t Association, of which Mrs. A. W. Roberts is president. At Memorial Hall, at 3 o'clock, the New Orleans Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy held their celebration. This was the occasion also of the presentation of a badge of honor to General Joseph Adolph Chalaron, whose gallant services during the war and unswerving faithfulness to the cause ever since entitled him to this distinction from the chapter. At both these celebrations the venerable Confederate chaplain, Dr. B. M. Palmer, was present, and delivered the prayer. The presence of this faithful Confederate hero is always the occasion of joy and loyal demonstration from the men who followed him in the dark days of ‘61 and ‘65, and whose love has grown stronger as the years have rolled away. At night the day closed with a magnificent celebration at Memorial Hall. It was fitting, indeed, that the Ladies' Confederate Memorial Association of New Orleans, the oldest of all the Confederate organizations of wom
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Jefferson Davis Monument Association holds the First celebration of the day of memory. (search)
autograph of Jefferson Davis, taken from the last letter that he wrote to Mrs. Roberts, and above was a card with two Confederate flags entwined — the army and navy, also given to Mrs. Roberts by Mr. Davis. The hall was well filled with ladies, a delegation from the Soldiers' Home was present, members of the Ladies' Confederate Memorial Association, with Mrs. Wm. J. Behan, president, and members of the Daughters of the Confederacy. The programme opened with a beautiful invocation by Dr. Palmer, and all heads were bowed as the venerable divine lifted his voice to the God of Hosts and prayed for the South, for the united country, for the living and the dead. Mrs. A. W. Roberts presided. As president of the association she read a short sketch of the organization, showing how it was organized on April 18, 1896, by four ladies, Mrs. Jefferson Davis Weir, Mrs. S. J. Fowler, Mrs. M. A. Farwood and herself. The charter was drafted by Colonel L. P. Briant, Mrs. Weir having been appoi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A Southern cross of honor presented to General J. A. Chalaron by the Daughters of the Confederacy. (search)
s. Alden McLellan, president of the New Orleans chapter, who introduced Rev. Dr. B. M. Palmer, who offered prayer. Then Mr. W. McL. Fayssoux, commander of the Sonsress in presenting the cross, and Colonel Chalaron responded at some length. Dr. Palmer closed the meeting with the benediction. There was a good attendance of las Sallie Owen, Mrs. D. A. S. Vaught, Mrs. J. R. Dicks, Mrs. J. J. Prowell. Rev. Dr. Palmer and Mr. Fayssoux were also on the platform. There were two large picturesthe observance of the day by the Daughters of the Confederacy, and introduced Dr. Palmer, who, in his prayer, spoke of the defense of the cause of constitutional righd, next to the great divine and grand southern patriarch and patriot, the Rev. Dr. B. M. Palmer. You have done me more than honor. For this cross comes unsolicitedh she had received, and Mrs. McLellan recognized the gift of a like compliment from Colonel Chalaron. Then Dr. Palmer dismissed the gathering with the benediction.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
ders. First: Send all extra baggage to the rear; Second, cook up three days rations; both easily complied with, because we had little extra baggage; second, our three days rations consisted of three pones of cornbread. May 4th, General Grant crossed the Rapidan with 117,000 men, the flower of the Federal army. Confronting him in the Wilderness was General Lee, with 55,000 ill-clad and poorly fed Confederates. May 5th, General Grant charged us in the Wilderness with three columns across Palmer's old field. Result: 1,100 killed in few hours; 146th New York nearly annihilated, and its commander, Major Gilbert, killed. Continued fighting 'till May 12th. Dead angle in front of Spotsylvania Courthouse, in which 1,100 of the Elmira prisoners were captured. Lee led the charge. Late in the evening, May 10th, we reached this spot, and General Lee considered it a strategic point, and in order to hold it he led a charge in person. General Gordon caught the bridle of his horse and l
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.19 (search)
ders. First: Send all extra baggage to the rear; Second, cook up three days rations; both easily complied with, because we had little extra baggage; second, our three days rations consisted of three pones of cornbread. May 4th, General Grant crossed the Rapidan with 117,000 men, the flower of the Federal army. Confronting him in the Wilderness was General Lee, with 55,000 ill-clad and poorly fed Confederates. May 5th, General Grant charged us in the Wilderness with three columns across Palmer's old field. Result: 1,100 killed in few hours; 146th New York nearly annihilated, and its commander, Major Gilbert, killed. Continued fighting 'till May 12th. Dead angle in front of Spotsylvania Courthouse, in which 1,100 of the Elmira prisoners were captured. Lee led the charge. Late in the evening, May 10th, we reached this spot, and General Lee considered it a strategic point, and in order to hold it he led a charge in person. General Gordon caught the bridle of his horse and l