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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 22 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 15 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Innis N. Palmer or search for Innis N. Palmer in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 7 document sections:

Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Captain Wilkes's seizure of Mason and Slidell. (search)
ly began privateering operations. She was a screw steamer of 500 tons, and was armed with 5 guns — an 8-inch pivot, and 24-pound howitzers. She cruised for two months in the Caribbean Sea and along the coast of South America, receiving friendly treatment and coaling without hindrance in the neutral ports. During the succeeding two months she cruised in the Atlantic. On the night of the 23d of November, she ran out of the port of St. Pierre, Island of Martinique, eluding the Iroquois (Captain Palmer), which had been sent to search for her. At Gibraltar, having been effectually blockaded by the Tuscarora, she was sold, afterward becoming a blockade runner. Among the vessels sent in search of her were the Niagara, Powhatan, Keystone State, Richmond, and San Jacinto. In his volume, The blockade and the Cruisers (Charles Scribner's Sons), Professor J. R. Soley sums up her career thus: During her cruise she had made 17 prizes, of which 2 were ransomed, 7 were released in Cuban po
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at Williamsburg, Va. (search)
Third division, Brig.-Gen. Silas Casey. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Henry M. Naglee: 11th Me., Col. John C. Caldwell; 56th N. Y., Col. Charles H. Van Wyck; 100th N. Y., Col. James M. Brown; 52d Pa., Col. John C. Dodge, Jr.; 104th Pa., Col. W. W. H. Davis. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. William H. Keim: 96th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Charles O. Gray; 85th Pa., Col. Joshua B. Howell; 101st Pa., Col. Joseph H. Wilson; 103d Pa., Maj. Audley W. Gazzam. Brigade loss (103d Pa.): w, 2. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Innis N. Palmer: 81st N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Jacob J. De Forest; 85th N. Y., Col. Jonathan S. Belknap; 92d N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Hiram Anderson, Jr.; 93d N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Benjamin C. Butler; 98th N. Y., Col. William Dutton. Artillery, Col. Guilford D. Bailey: 7th N. Y., Capt. Peter C. Regan; 8th N. Y., Capt. Butler Fitch; A, 1st N. Y., Capt. Thomas H. Bates; H, 1st N. Y., Capt. Joseph Spratt. advance-guard, Brig.-Gen. George Stoneman. Brig.-Gen. P. St. George Cooke and William H. Emory, brigade comm
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Opposing forces at Seven Pines, May 31-June 1, 1862. (search)
isted; 56th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. James Jourdan; 100th N. Y., Col. James M. Brown (k); 52d Pa., Col. John C. Dodge, Jr.; 104th Pa., Col. W. W. H. Davis (w), Capt. Edward L. Rogers. Brigade loss: k, 89; w, 383; m, 167 = 639. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Henry W. Wessells: 96th N. Y., Col. James Fairman; 85th Pa., Col. Joshua B. Howell; 101st Pa., Lieut.-Col. David B. Morris (w), Capt. Charles W. May; 103d Pa., Maj. A. W. Gazzam. Brigade loss: k, 35; w, 264; m, 59 == 358. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Innis N. Palmer: 81st N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Jacob J. De Forest (w), Capt. W. C. Raulston; 85th N. Y., Col. J. S. Belknap; 92d N. Y., Col. Lewis C. Hunt (w), Lieut.-Col. Hiram Anderson, Jr.; 98th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Charles Durkee. Brigade loss: k, 46; w, 251 ; m, 95= 392. Artillery, Col. Guilford D. Bailey (k), Maj. D. H. Van Valkenburgh (k), Capt. Peter C. Regan: A, 1st N. Y., Lieut. George P. Hart; H, 1st N. Y., Capt. Joseph Spratt (w), Lieut. Charles E. Mink; 7th N. Y., Capt. Peter C. Regan; 8th N
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 5.26 (search)
rate signal-guns were heard, and the division was ordered into position to resist attack. The camps of these troops were immediately in rear of the earth-works. Palmer's brigade on the left, Wessells's in the center, and Naglee's on the right. Two regiments of Naglee's brigade were detached, supporting the picket-line, as alreary was placed four hundred yards in advance of the earth-works, on the north side of the road, closely supported by three regiments of Naglee's brigade and one of Palmer's. In moving to attack, Rodes's brigade was on the south side of the road, supported by Rains; Garland's brigade, on the north side of the road, was supported hurled back in disorder, and could not be rallied until they had retreated beyond the earth-works from which they had advanced. A large proportion of the men of Palmer's and Wessells's brigades having been thrown into great disorder whilst retiring through the second abatis, and finding the earth-works of the second line already
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.42 (search)
., Col. David J. Nevin; 93d Pa., Capt. John S. Long; 98th Pa., Col. John F. Ballier; 102d Pa., Col. Thomas A. Rowley. Brigade loss: k, 27; w, 148; m, 33==208. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John J. Abercrombie: 65th N. Y. (lst U. S. Chasseurs), Lieut.-Col. Alexander Shaler; 67th N. Y. (1st Long Island), Lieut.-Col. Nelson Cross; 23d Pa., Col. Thomas H. Neill; 31st Pa., Col. David 11. Williams; 61st Pa., Lieut.-Col. Frank Vallee. Brigade loss: k, 19; w, 168; m, 16==203. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Innis N. Palmer: 7th Mass., Col. David A. Russell; 10th Mass., Maj. Ozro Miller (m w), Capt. Frederick Barton; 36th N. Y., Maj. James A. Raney; 2d R. I., Col. Frank Wheaton. Brigade loss: k, 23; w, 194; in, 48==265. Artillery: C, 1st Pa., Capt. Jeremiah McCarthy; D, 1st Pa., Capt. Edward H. Flood. Second division, Brig.-Gen. John J. Peck. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Henry M. Naglee: 11th Me., Col. Harris M. Plaisted; 56th N. Y., Col. Charles I. Van Wyck; 100th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Phineas Staunto
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of Malvern Hill. (search)
the meadow (not visible) on the left. The wooded knoll is supposed to be the point from which Generals Wright and Armistead reconnoitered the Federal position, as described by General Wright in his report. [See p. 418.]--Editors. far and near, and in any direction, was fearful to behold. Pressed to the extreme as they were, the courage of our men was fully tried. The safety of our army — the life of the Union--was felt to be at stake. In one case the brigades of Howe, Abercrombie, and Palmer, of Couch's division, under impulse, gallantly pushed after the retreating foe, captured colors, and advantageously advanced the right of the line, but at considerable loss and great risk. The brigades of Morell, cool, well-disciplined, and easily controlled, let the enemy return after each repulse, but permitted few to escape their fire. Colonel McQuade, on Morell's left, with the 14th New York, against orders and at the risk of defeat and disaster, yielding to impulse, gallantly (lashed
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Iuka and Corinth. (search)
Union--Grant, Sherman, and Sheridan; and with them were George H. Thomas, whom Greeley believed to be the greatest soldier of them all, and Buell, and Pope, and Rosecrans, and many others that rose to high command. With it, but not of it, were also the great War Governor of Indiana, Oliver P. Morton, and the Assistant Secretary of War, Colonel Thomas A. Scott, the railway king of the future, who had come to advise and assist Halleck; while in commands more or less important were McClernand, Palmer, Oglesby, Hurlbut, John A. Logan, and Colonel Robert G. Ingersoll, Illinoisians all. The 31st Ohio Volunteers building breastworks before Corinth in May, 1862. from a Lithograph. Halleck, before advancing, reorganized his army. Having little faith in Grant, he assigned him to the merely honorary position of second in command of the forces — a position analogous to and as unimportant as that of Vice-President. George H. Thomas was transferred with his division from Buell's army to Gr