Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Pardee or search for Pardee in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 3 document sections:

ch division was sent to destroy the railroad between Atlanta and the Chattahoochee River, which was reported the next morning as effectually done. Changes in the principal commands of the corps since the last campaign,. left the organization as follows: First division, Brigadier-General A. J. Jackson commanding. The brigades commanded respectively by Colonels Selfridge, Carman, and Robinson. Second division, Brigadier-General J. W. Geary commanding. Three brigades, commanded by Colonels Pardee, Jones, and Barnum. Third division, Brigadier-General W. T. Ward commanding. Three brigades, commanded by Colonels F. C. Smith, Dustin, and Ross. A list of regiments composing the brigades will be found in reports of subordinate commanders. The artillery was reduced to four batteries of four guns each; two of three-inch Rodmans, and two of twelve-pounder Napoleons, under charge of Major J. A. Reynolds, Chief of Artillery. The horses were increased to eight to a carriage. Th
ch division was sent to destroy the railroad between Atlanta and the Chattahoochee River, which was reported the next morning as effectually done. Changes in the principal commands of the corps since the last campaign,. left the organization as follows: First division, Brigadier-General A. J. Jackson commanding. The brigades commanded respectively by Colonels Selfridge, Carman, and Robinson. Second division, Brigadier-General J. W. Geary commanding. Three brigades, commanded by Colonels Pardee, Jones, and Barnum. Third division, Brigadier-General W. T. Ward commanding. Three brigades, commanded by Colonels F. C. Smith, Dustin, and Ross. A list of regiments composing the brigades will be found in reports of subordinate commanders. The artillery was reduced to four batteries of four guns each; two of three-inch Rodmans, and two of twelve-pounder Napoleons, under charge of Major J. A. Reynolds, Chief of Artillery. The horses were increased to eight to a carriage. Th
and my line was established along an old rice-field dyke, myself (Barnum's brigade) resting on the river bank, my right (Pardee's brigade) extending toward the Augusta road, while Jones's brigade was massed in reserve in rear of Barnum's. Toward nig my First brigade commenced constructing Fort No. 2, to be a large lunette for heavy guns, in the open field, in front of Pardee's left. This position being exposed to fire from all the batteries in my front, the work upon it had to be done quietly d over them, exactly four years since the passage by the State of South-Carolina of the secession act. Two regiments from Pardee's brigade, the Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania and Twenty-ninth Ohio veteran volunteers, were sent down to Fort Jackson, and eder command of Colonel Dustin, then in command of this division. A detailed report of that expedition will be made by Major Pardee, who was in command of the regiment at that time, and during the time of my absence. On the fifth November, the regim