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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Our Gettysburg series. (search)
tions to some of the Confederate leaders who are still alive, and with whom you are in correspondence. The opinion of General Early, for whom I have the greatest consideration as a soldier, would be especially valuable for me. Of course I do not pledge myself to accept wholly any one's opinion, but it would be of the greatest importance for me to know what Confederate officers think now of the causes of their repulse at Gettysburg. Believe me, dear sir, yours truly, L. P. D'Orleans, Comte de Paris. [Address: Chateau d'eu Seine-Inferieure, France.] Letter from Maj. Scheibert, of the Prussian Royal Engineers. [As the opinion of a distinguished foreigner who witnessed the battle of Gettysburg and has manifested the liveliest interest in the discussion concerning it, the following letter will have an interest for all of our readers; but for those who knew the gallant Prussian, and appreciated his warm sympathy for our struggling people, it will have a peculiar interest.]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Remarks on the numerical strength of both armies at Gettysburg (search)
Remarks on the numerical strength of both armies at Gettysburg Comte de Paris. [We publish with great pleasure the following paper from our distinguished friend, and only regret that a clear, conclusive note from Colonel Walter H. Taylor, pointing out the errors which the Count still holds (in spite of the fair spirit in which he writes), is crowded into our next number.] The returns of both armies generally gave three figures for each body of troops, which figures it is essential not treported by Meade was 13,621, but as this figure includes 7,262 wounded prisoners treated in the Federal hospitals, it leaves a balance of 6,359 valid prisoners only, which agrees well with the Confederate statement, about a thousand of the men reported missing, especially in Pickett's division, being really wounded left on the ground. There is therefore no discrepancy between these figures. Louis Philippe D'Orleans, Comte de Paris. Chateau d'eu Seine Inferieure, France, December 4th, 1877.