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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 0 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for John Paris or search for John Paris in all documents.

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Culpeper; but although the enemy had forced the guard at Kelly's Ford, and compelled General Rhodes to fall back with a loss of two hundred men killed, wounded, and missing, yet no attack was made on us by the infantry. In the afternoon, the enemy's cavalry attacked General Wilcox's brigade, and were badly cut up. During Sunday night General Lee fell back to his old position south of the Rapidan. P. S.--Lieutenants Morrison, Lefler, and Maynard, of the Fifty-seventh, are all safe. John Paris, Chaplain Fifty-fourth Regiment N. C. T. General Meade's congratulatory order. headquarters army of the Potomac, November 9. General order No. 101. The Commanding General congratulates the army upon the recent successful passage of the Rappahannock in the face of the enemy, compelling him to withdraw to his intrenchments behind the Rapidan. To Major-General Sedgwick and the officers and men of the Fifth and Sixth corps participating in the attack, particularly to the stormin
e principles enunciated in the fourth article of the declaration of Paris in reference to blockades. Your predecessors of the provisional Coient really to prevent access to our coast, that the declaration of Paris was, in truth, directed against blockades not sustained by any actugreement, or longer to respect those articles of the declaration of Paris, which had been repeatedly denounced by British statesmen, and had nguage is used: It is said we have, contrary to the declarations of Paris, contrary to international law, permitted the blockade of three tholine of conduct which ignores the obligations of the declaration of Paris, and treats that instrument rather as a theoretical exposition of pt open to this objection. The second article of the declaration of Paris, which provides that the neutral flag covers enemy's goods, with th rights to their full extent. The principles of the declaration of Paris commend themselves to our judgment as more just, more humane, and m