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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Druid Hill Park or search for Druid Hill Park in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
er and the mountains, whose floods and forests he will make fight for him, even as the stars in their courses fought against Sisera, but under conditions wholly novel. Now that you may comprehend Jackson, I must endeavor to make you see this region of Port Republic, as nearly as may be. Behold then the side road from Harrisonburg to that village, passing over sundry miles of those high hills, common to calcareous regions, [lofty as the highest viewed from the northernmost end of your Druid Hill Park,] mostly parallel to each other, and at right angles to the road, clad also frequently with woodlands upon their summits, the vales between filled with farms. Close at the foot of the last of these ridges flows the shining river, here running almost due east, as does the great mountain parallel to it, three miles away. Look thitherward, and between you and that green rampart you see, first the water, then smooth meadows far below you, spreading wider to the left, away to Lewiston, unt
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stonewall Jackson. (search)
er and the mountains, whose floods and forests he will make fight for him, even as the stars in their courses fought against Sisera, but under conditions wholly novel. Now that you may comprehend Jackson, I must endeavor to make you see this region of Port Republic, as nearly as may be. Behold then the side road from Harrisonburg to that village, passing over sundry miles of those high hills, common to calcareous regions, [lofty as the highest viewed from the northernmost end of your Druid Hill Park,] mostly parallel to each other, and at right angles to the road, clad also frequently with woodlands upon their summits, the vales between filled with farms. Close at the foot of the last of these ridges flows the shining river, here running almost due east, as does the great mountain parallel to it, three miles away. Look thitherward, and between you and that green rampart you see, first the water, then smooth meadows far below you, spreading wider to the left, away to Lewiston, unt
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
they may desire, as the number will soon be exhausted. the Reunion of Morgan's men at Lexington, Ky., on the 24th, 25th, and 26th of July, was a joyous and interesting occasion, which we regret that our limited space now will not enable us to describe in full. About 1200 of the old command and, perhaps, 500 comrades and invited guests of other Confederate commands were present, and it was indeed pleasant to mingle with these veterans as under the shade of the beautiful grove of Woodland Park they recalled the stirring events of 1861-1865, as they rode with their gallant chief on so many daring raids—fought under him on so many glorious fields—suffered with him in the prison,—rejoiced at his daring escape—or wept over his sad death. The first day Colonel Frank Waters made an address of welcome on behalf of the City of Lexington, and General William Preston, one for both the city and county. General Basil W. Duke, President of the Association, responded in behalf of Morgan's m