Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for George W. Parker or search for George W. Parker in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 5 document sections:

The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 3 (search)
ocky Face Ridge, with combats at Buzzard Roost or Mill Creek Gap, and Dug Gap. May 8-13, 1864.Demonstration against Resaca, with combats at Snake Creek Gap, Sugar Valley, and near Resaca. May 9-13, 1864.Demonstration against Dalton, with combats near Varnell's Station (9th and 12th) and at Dalton (13th). May 13, 1864.Skirmish at Tilton. May 14-15, 1864.Battle of Resaca. May 15, 1864.Skirmish at Armuchee Creek. Skirmish near Rome. May 16, 1864.Skirmish near Calhoun. Action at Rome (or Parker's) Cross-Roads. Skirmish at Floyd's Spring. May 17, 1864.Engagement at Adairsville. Action at Rome. Affair at Madison Station, Ala. May 18, 1864.Skirmish at Pine Log Creek. May 18-19, 1864.Combats near Kingston. Combats near Cassville. May 20, 1864.Skirmish'at Etowah River, near Cartersville. May 23, 1864.Action at Stilesborough. May 24, 1864.Skirmishes at Cass Station and Cassville. Skirmish at Burnt Hickory (or Huntsville). Skirmish near Dallas. May 25-June 5, 1864.Operations
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 30 (search)
the opposite side. At this point no enemy was discovered. Two mounted men, wearing the uniform of U. S. soldiers, advanced within a few rods of these sentinels and refused to obey their orders. When ordered to halt, wheeled and rode off at a rapid rate. The sentinels discharged their pieces, wounding both of the men. The regiment was entirely without support, the troops of the Second Division, Fourth Army Corps, having marched to the rear on the Atlanta road. Company A, commanded by Captain Parker, was placed on picket on this road, and discovered the enemy in force on the south bank of Peach Tree Creek, making works. A few shots were exchanged, but no attempt to advance was made until the balance of the Third Brigade joined us. The whole command then crossed the creek, formed line, and make good works. On the 20th the Eighth Kansas Volunteers take our place; we move to the left, take position in second line; have 1 man killed. On July 21 change position; 1 man of the picket co
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 73 (search)
olunteers; Lieutenant-Colonel Bailey, of the Ninth Kentucky Volunteers; Maj. George W. Parker, of the Seventy-ninth Indiana Volunteers; Maj. D. M. Claggett, of the S hour's duration. When it ceased, a strong skirmish line, commanded by Maj. George W. Parker, of the Seventy-ninth Indiana Volunteers, supported by the balance of tommand of that regiment on account of sickness. Command was assumed by Maj. George W. Parker. The brigade remained in the above-described position until the 2d of he Ninth Kentucky to cover the advance as skirmishers, under command of Maj. George W. Parker, of the Seventy-ninth Indiana Volunteers. The line of skirmishers was eat credit is due Col. George H. Cram, of the Ninth Kentucky Volunteers, and Major Parker, of the Seventy-ninth Indiana Volunteers, for the gallant manner in which the advance was made, and the success of the crossing. I regret that Major Parker was severely wounded. On the 20th of July the brigade marched in support of the Firs
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 74 (search)
6 men killed and 17 wounded. On the 28th day of June Lieut. Col. Samuel P. Oyler was relieved from command on account of sickness and sent to hospital, and Maj. George W. Parker took command of the regiment. On the 19th day of July the regiment, with the Ninth Kentucky Volunteers, was placed on the front line of the brigade and ora point three miles north of Atlanta, Ga., and attack the enemy on the opposite side. The movement was well executed and was most successful, and, except Maj. George W. Parker wounded, the loss to the regiment was very light. Major Parker being severely wounded, Capt. John G. Dunbar assumed command of the regiment. On the 21st Major Parker being severely wounded, Capt. John G. Dunbar assumed command of the regiment. On the 21st day of July the regiment was ordered by the brigade commander to take a position in line with the Ninth Kentucky Volunteers on the left and the Nineteenth Ohio Volunteers on the right, and fortify it at a point about three miles northeast of Atlanta, Ga. In fortifying the position the regiment was exposed to a constant fire from
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 77 (search)
-ninth Indiana and Ninth Kentucky. I accordingly directed Lieutenant-Colonel Bailey, of the Ninth Kentucky, to move into position on the left of the Seventyninth Indiana. Fifty skirmishers were thrown out from each regiment, under command of Major Parker, Seventy-ninth Indiana. The brigade corps of pioneers, under command of Major Gemmer, succeeded in throwing a bridge across the creek at two points, about 100 yards apart. The crossing of the creek was effected under fire of the enemy's skirmishers, with but little loss. The space between the creek and the enemy was a corn-field, about 300 yards across. I had just made the disposition to advance when Major Parker, Seventy-ninth Indiana, commanding the skirmishers,was, unfortunately, wounded by a sharpshooter, thus delaying the advance some minutes. I placed Captain Dunbar, Seventy-ninth Indiana, in command of the skirmishers, and ordered him forward, I following with the regiments some 150 yards to the rear. The enemy was surpr