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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The capture of Mr. Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States. (search)
fabricated the story about his disguise in an old woman's dress. I heard the whole matter talked over as a good joke; and the officers, who knew better, never took the trouble to deny it. Perhaps .they thought the Confederate President deserved all the contempt that could be put upon him. I think so, too; only I would never perpetrate a falsehood that by any means would become history. And, further, I would never slander a woman who has shown so much devotion as Mrs. Davis has to her husband, no matter how wicked he is or may have been. I defy any person to find a single officer or soldier who was present at the capture of Jefferson Davis who will say, upon honor, that he was disguised in woman's clothes, or that his wife acted in any way unladylike or undignified on that occasion. I go for trying him for his crimes, and, if he is found guilty, punishing him. But I would not lie about him, when the truth will certainly make it bad enough. James H. Parker. Elburnville, Pa.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
he made no reference to the false report that Mr. Davis was caught in the endeavor to escape in his wife's clothes. That story was made up by a newspaper correspondent, but circulation was given to it by Major-General J. H. Wilson, who, in his official report to Mr. Stanton, the Secretary of War, on the 14th of May, makes the statement, saying he derived it from the captors. Colonel Pritchard, however, makes no such statement in his published official report and correspondence. Mr James H. Parker, of Elburnville, Pa., who was one of the squad who arrested Mr. Davis, and the first to recognize him, published in the Portland (Maine) Argus, while Davis was still in confinement, a full denial of the whole story. He says that some newspaper correspondent fabricated it, and that it was regarded merely as a joke in the command. He writes: She (Mrs. Davis) behaved like a lady, and he as a gentleman, though manifestly he was chagrined at being taken into custody. Our soldiers b
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The trials and trial of Jefferson Davis. (search)
he made no reference to the false report that Mr. Davis was caught in the endeavor to escape in his wife's clothes. That story was made up by a newspaper correspondent, but circulation was given to it by Major-General J. H. Wilson, who, in his official report to Mr. Stanton, the Secretary of War, on the 14th of May, makes the statement, saying he derived it from the captors. Colonel Pritchard, however, makes no such statement in his published official report and correspondence. Mr James H. Parker, of Elburnville, Pa., who was one of the squad who arrested Mr. Davis, and the first to recognize him, published in the Portland (Maine) Argus, while Davis was still in confinement, a full denial of the whole story. He says that some newspaper correspondent fabricated it, and that it was regarded merely as a joke in the command. He writes: She (Mrs. Davis) behaved like a lady, and he as a gentleman, though manifestly he was chagrined at being taken into custody. Our soldiers b