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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 6: the Army of the Potomac.--the Trent affair.--capture of Roanoke Island. (search)
d: James McCloud, Louis Richards, Thomas Flood, James Buck,) Oscar E. Peck, Thomas Gehegan, Edward Farrel, Peter Williams, Benjamin Sevearer, John Davis, Charles Kenyon, Jeremiah Regan, Alexander Hood, John Kelley, Daniel Lakin, John Williams, John Breese, Alfred Patterson, Thomas C. Barton, Edwin Smith, Daniel Harrington, John Williams, J. B. Frisbee, Thomas Bourne, William McKnight, William Martin, John Greene, John McGowan, Amos Bradley, George Hollat, Charles Florence, William young, William Parker, Edward Wright, Charles Bradley, Timothy Sullivan, James Byrnes, John McDonald, Charles Robinson, Pierre Leno, Peter Colton, Charles W. Morton, William Martin, Robert Williams, George Bell, William Thompson, John Williams, Matthew Arthur, John MacKIEie, Matthew McClelland, Joseph E. Vantine, John Rush, John Hickman, Robert Anderson, Peter Howard, Andrew Brinn, P. R. Vaughn, Samuel woods, Henry Thielberg, Robert B. Wood, Robert Jordan, Thomas W. Hamilton, Frank Bois, Thomas Jenkins, Marti
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 14: movements of the Army of the Potomac.--the Monitor and Merrimack. (search)
on. Her main-mast was crippled by a shot sent from Sewell's Point when she was passing, and when within a mile and a half of Newport-Newce she ran aground. There she was attacked by the Merrimack and two of the Confederate gun-boats, the Jamestown and Patrick Henry. The armed vessels that assisted the Merrimack in her raid, were the Patrick Henry, Commander Tucker, 6 guns; Jamestown, Lieutenant-Commanding Barney, 2 guns; and Raleigh, Lieutenant-Commanding Alexander; Beaufort, Lieutenant-Commanding Parker, and Teazer, Lieutenant-Commanding Webb, each one gun. Fortunately, the water was so shallow that the Merrimack could not approach within a mile of her. She fought gallantly, and at dusk her assailants, considerably crippled, withdrew, and went up toward Norfolk. Commodore Buchanan and several others on board the Merrimack were wounded. The Commander was so badly hurt that Captain Jones, his second in command, took charge of the vessels. Two of her guns were broken; her prow
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 19: battle of the forts and capture of New Orleans. (search)
for his rapid and skillful attention to the wounded, but for his general officer-like bearing. My clerk, Mr. Charles M. Burns, Jr., was of material assistance in communicating my orders. Our engines, although generally unreliable, were, on this occasion, worked successfully by Second-assistant George W. Rogers and his assistants. In conclusion, I must mention with praise the conduct of the following men: Charles Florence, captain of 11-inch gun; William Young, captain of Parrott gun; William Parker, at the wheel; Edward Wright, at the lead. April 25.--I continue this report through the battles of to-day. At 11 A. M., being at that moment some half a mile in advance of the flag-ship, the batteries on either hand opened on us at short range. Being pivoted to port, I edged off with the port helm and responded with our 11-inch and Parrott, slowly but with great precision of aim. This unequal contest lasted just fifteen minutes, when the flag-ship ranged up in splendid style, diver
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 20: a brave officer's mortification.--history set right. (search)
E. Stevens. Steamer Oneida. Commander, S. P. Lee; Lieutenant, S. F. Brown; Acting-Masters, Thomas Edwards, Pierre Giraud and Elijah Ross; Midshipmen, G. W. Wood and F. J. Naile; Surgeon, John Y. Taylor; Paymaster, C. W. Hassler; Chief Engineer F. C. Dade; Second-Assistant Engineers, H. McMurtrie and R. H. Fitch; Third-Assistant Engineers, W. D. Mcllvaine, A. S. Brower, G. W. Stivers and R. M. Hodgson; Acting-Masters' Mates, Edw. Bird and Daniel Clark; Boatswain, James Herold; Gunner, Wm. Parker. Steamer Owasco. Lieutenant-Commander, John Guest; Lieutenant, Chester Hatfield; Acting-Masters, T. D. Dabb and D. P. Heath; Assistant Surgeon, W. M. Leavitt; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Richard Beardsley; Second-Assistant Engineer, W. K. Purse; Third-Assistant Engineers, J. A. Scott, C. H. Greenleaf and D. B. Egbert; Acting-Masters' Mates, W. M. Tomlinson and John Utter. Steamer Pensacola. Captain, Henry W. Morris; Lieutenants, F. A. Roe, Jas. Stillwell and C. E. McKay; Acting
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 23: destruction of the ram Arkansas.--capture of Galveston.--capture of the Harriet Lane.--sinking of the Hatteras.--attack on Baton Rouge.--Miscellaneous engagements of the gun-boats. (search)
E. J. Waugh; Carpenter, G. M. Doughty; Sailmaker, J. C. Herbert; Acting-Masters, G. B. Livingstone, A. L. B. Zerega and W. L. Churchill; Acting-Masters' Mates, F. G. Adams and E. B. Pratt. Steamer Oneida. Captain, Samuel F. Hazard; Lieutenants, W. N. Allen and F. S. Brown; Surgeon, John Y. Taylor; Paymaster, C. W. Hassler; Chief Engineer, F. C. Dade; Assistant Engineers, Horace McMurtrie, J. H. Morrison, R. H. Fitch, W. D. McIlvaine and A. S. Brower; Boatswain, James Herold; Gunner, Wm. Parker; Acting-Masters, F. M. Green, Thos. Edwards and Elijah Ross; Acting-Masters' Mates, Edward Bird and D. H. Clark. Steamer Monongahela. Captain, James P. McKinstry; Lieutenant-Commander, Jos. Watters; Lieutenant, N. W. Thomas; Surgeon, David Kindleberger; Assistant Paymaster, Forbes Parker; Acting-Ensigns, C. R. Pomeroy, H. W. Grinnell and Robert Barlow; Acting-Masters' Mates, H. B. Rowe, W. S. Arnaud, Frederick Beldon and C. H. Blount; Engineers: Chief, Geo. F. Kutz; Joseph Frilley, N
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 44: battle of Mobile Bay. (search)
the port side, [and] starting a fire on the top of the magazine. Owing to the presence of mind of Acting-Ensign Hall, commanding the powder division, and Gunner William Parker, the fire was promptly extinguished. and the supply of powder was as rapid as ever before. At 35 minutes past 8 signal was made that the captain was wo Acting-Master's Mates Edward Bird, Daniel Clark, and John Devereaux behaved courageously. Commander (afterwards Rear-Admiral) J. R. Madison Mullany. Gunner Wm. Parker and Boatswain Hallowell Dickinson merit mention for their good conduct. I leave it to Chief-Engineer W. H. Hunt to speak of the officers and men under hisnd R. H. Fitch; Third-Assistants, N. D. McIlvaine and C. W. Breaker: Acting-Third-Assistants, W. E. Dearer and Nicholas Dillon; Boatswain, H. Dickinson; Gunner, Wm. Parker. Steamer Princess Royal. Commander, M. B. Woolsey; Lieutenant, C. E. McKay; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, T. K. Chandler; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, F. T. Mo
reed upon before leaving Hatteras were carried out. I will be excused for saying in reference to the action, that I owe everything to Generals Foster, Reno and Parker, as more full details will show. I am sorry to report the loss of about thirty-five killed, and about two hundred wounded, ten of them probably mortally. Among o desert this section of country. If I have erred in judgment, by a speedy notification, the error will be corrected. Commander Hunter, Lieut. Commanders Cooke, Parker, and Alexander, and Masters Commanding McCorrick, Taylor, and Hoole, bravely sustained the credit of the service, and every officer and man performed his duty witC. W. Knight, E. R. Silas, A. Betts, L. C. Manly, J. Miller, G. Picot, W. D. Jones, Jas. McKay, Joseph Witty. First Lieutenants, W. H. Hartman, S. J. Latham, Wm. Parker, Quentin Utly, H. B. Jordan, J. H. Hughes, J. Pipkin, F. H. Perry, C H. Coffold, F. J. Bowen. Second Lieutenants, R. Steagrell, M. T. Sealy S. W. Morrisett,
before this reaches you, as they can go only some few miles toward Norfolk. The log-books of the steamers, together with the signal-book of the rebel navy, and all their navy signal-colors, fell into our hands, with many other records and papers, which places us in possession of much that is valuable. The following are the names of the seven steamers which we encountered to-day, with their commanders: Ellis, Capt. C. W. Cooke; Raleigh, Capt. Alexander; Fanny, Capt. Taylor; Beaufort, Capt. Parker; Accomac, Capt. Sands; Forrest, Capt. Hoover; Sea Bird, (the rebel flag-ship,) Com. Lynch. All of these commanders were educated in the United States Naval Academy. Capt. Cooke is taken prisoner by our forces. As I have already said, the Raleigh and Beaufort escaped. When it became evident that nothing but disaster awaited them, the rebels, after firing their gunboats, fled to the village, and commenced firing the principal buildings. It is said that Col. Martin, of Hatteras memory,
he men. When we began to march to support Colonel Lauman, companies A and G were out skirmishing. I despatched Adjutant Duncan to bring them up, which was splendidly done, and he performed all other duties required promptly and effectively. Surgeon Parker was on duty at the hospital; Assistant-Surgeon Finley performed faithful service in attending to the wounded; Quartermaster Dorr was performing his duty in forwarding supplies — his energy and efficiency cannot be too highly praised; the coloMajor Jones, my Assistant Quartermaster, for the prompt manner in which they executed my orders under trying circumstances throughout the long and continued conflicts; and to Major Gilmer, who accompanied me throughout the entire day. Also, to Capt. Parker of my staff, whom I assigned to the command of Capt. Ross's field-battery, with new recruits as gunners, and who fought and served them well. Col. Brandon was severely wounded early in the action. Col. Baldwin's command constituted the fro
pon the capture of Fort Donelson--was the discomfiture and rout of Quantril and Parker, with seventy-five men, by two companies of the Second Ohio Cavalry under Lieut. Nettleton. The facts are as follows: Learning that Parker, with a company of sixty men from Waverly, Mo., and Quantril, with fifteen men, were at Independence, escaped, but Smiley was captured. In a few minutes more, in came Quantril, and Parker with seventy — five men, who disarmed him and deliberately shot him with his owthem to be half-way to Kansas City, were aware of their approach. Quantril and Parker precipitately fled, leaving their men to follow as best they could. They were whole affair was the death of the rebel gang, including (as the prisoners say) Parker himself. If this is the case, the affair has been a great benefit to the community, as this Parker has been the terror of all isolated Union families in this region of country. Lieut. Nettleton deserves much credit for the manner in which th
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