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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Durant A. Parker or search for Durant A. Parker in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lane's Corps of sharpshooters. (search)
Surgeons.—Charles Lecesne, William Brower, Alexander Gordon, Simpson Russ. Chaplain.—Colin Shaw. Twenty-eighth North Carolina Regiment. Colonels.—James H. Lane, Sam D. Lowe. Lieutenant-Colonels.—Thomas L. Lowe, Sam D. Lowe, William D. Barringer, William H. A. Speer. Majors.—Richard E. Reeves, Sam D. Lowe, Wm. J. Montgomery, William D. Barringer, William H. A. Speer, Samuel N. Stowe. Adjutants.—Duncan A. McRae, Romulus S. Folger. Quartermasters.—George S. Thompson, Durant A. Parker. Commissary.—Nicholas Gibbon. Surgeons.—Robert Gibbon, W. W. Gaither. Assistant Surgeons.—F. N. Luckey, R. G. Barham, Thomas B. Lane, N. L. Mayo. Chaplains.—Oscar J. Brent, F. Milton Kennedy, D. S. Henkel. Thirty-Third North Carolina Regiment. Colonels.—L. O'B. Branch, Clark M. Avery, Robert V. Cowan. Lieutenat-Colonels.—Clark M. Avery, Robert F. Hoke, Robert V. Cowan, Joseph H. Saunders. Majors.—Robert F. Hoke, W. Gaston Lewis, Robert V. Cow
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Glowing tribute to General R. E. Lee. (search)
dly interest. I can recall the deep impression these interviews made upon me. No emperor on his throne, nor prince nor potentate on earth could inspire me with the sense of superiority which I felt General Lee possessed over all mankind. The atmosphere about him was that of the high mountains, rare and invigorating, and the mental vision was treated to a sense of the sublime. I saw him often as we entered the Wilderness. I saw him rally the troops of Heth's Division that evening near Parker's store. I heard him say to some rushing out from the firing line, as it is now called, Steady, men, go back! We need all good men at the front now, and Colonel Venable remonstrated with him for being so close under fire, but Mars Robert wouldn't leave until the line was restored. This was not the incident which occurred (next morning) at the same spot, when the Texans yelled, You go back, General Lee, to the rear, as they plunged into the masses of the enemy and hurled them back at th