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Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 161 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 156 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 116 2 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 76 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 71 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 49 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 47 1 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 36 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 33 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson 32 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Theodore Parker or search for Theodore Parker in all documents.

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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 2: little Julia Ward 1819-1835; aet. 1-16 (search)
ned and marked, day after day, and presently handed to the amazed principal a note correctly written in Italian, begging permission to join the class. At nine years old she was reading Pilgrim's progress, and seeking its characters in the people she met every day. She always counted it one of the books which had most influenced her. Another was Gibbon's Decline and fall of the Roman Empire, which she read at seventeen. In later life she added to these the works of Spinoza, and of Theodore Parker. She began at an early age to write verse. A manuscript volume has been preserved in which some of these early poems were copied for her father. The title-page and dedication are here reproduced: Poems Dedicated to Samuel Ward esq By His affectionate daughter Julia Ward. Let me be thine Regard not with a critic's eye. New York 1831. To Samuel Ward. Beloved father, Expect not to find in these juvenile productions the delicacy and grace which pervaded the writings of that
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 5: travel 1843-1844; aet. 24-25 (search)
nd Mario, Alboni and Persiani. Julia, who had been forbidden the theatre since her seventh year, enjoyed to the full both music and drama, but the crowning ecstasy of all she found in the ballet, of which Fanny Elssler and Cerito were the stars. The former was beginning to wane; the dancing which to Emerson and Margaret Fuller seemed poetry and religion had lost, perhaps, something of its magic; the latter was still in her early bloom and grace. Years later, our mother suggested to Theodore Parker that the best stage dancing gives the classic, in a fluent form, with the illumination of life and personality. She recalled nothing sensual or even sensuous in the dances she saw that season, only the very ectasy and embodiment of grace. (But the Doctor thought Cerito ought to be sent to the House of Correction!) Among the English friends, the one to whom our parents became most warmly attached was Lord Morpeth, afterwards Earl of Carlisle. This gentleman proved a devoted friend
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 6: South Boston 1844-1851; aet. 25-32 (search)
s time, none had so deep and lasting an influence over her as Theodore Parker, who had long been a close friend of the Doctor's. She had firn intimacy sprang up between the two families which ended only with Parker's life. He baptized the baby Julia; on returning to this country, en it was possible for a minister of a Christian church, hearing of Parker's dangerous illness, to pray that God might remove him from the ear talked with God, and took us with him into the divine presence. Parker could play as well as preach; she loved to make fun with him. Witness her Philosophmaster and poet-aster in Passion flowers. Parker's own powers of merrymaking appear in his Latin epitaph on the Doctor (who s to shake her head as she recalled a naughty mot of hers apropos of Parker's preaching: I would rather, she said, hear Theodore Parker preach Theodore Parker preach than go to the theatre; I would rather go to the theatre than go to a party; I would rather go to a party than stay at home! A letter to h
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 7: passion flowers 1852-1858; aet. 33-39 (search)
o pay for itself. It has done more for me, in point of consideration here, than a fortune of a hundred thousand dollars. Parker quoted some of my verses in his Christmas sermon, and this I considered as the greatest of honors. I sat there and heard, and she opened it herself. To all of us, Charles Sumner and his brothers, Albert and George, Hillard, Agassiz, Andrew, Parker were familiar figures, and fit naturally into the background of Green Peace. Of these Charles Sumner, always the Doctoe in literary history. God rest her! she was as faithful and earnest as she was clever --she suffered much. ... Theodore Parker and wife came here last night, to stay a week if they like it (have just had a fight with a bumble-bee, in avoiding troduced him right and left to people who had never voted for him and never will. The pious were permitted to enjoy Theodore Parker, and Julia's schoolmaster sat on a sofa and talked about Carlyle. I did not care -the colored man made it all right
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 8: little Sammy: the Civil War 1859-1863; aet. 40-44 (search)
air and scene was imperative. At the same time Theodore Parker, already stricken with a mortal disease, was ormself as if, like Farinata, Her pet name for Theodore Parker. Vide Dante's Inferno. avesse l'inferno in gra was sad. All felt that they were to meet no more. Parker died in Florence fifteen months later. A pleasanral years before this, she had unwillingly left Theodore Parker's congregation at our father's request. She rey service which militates against that feeling. At Parker's meeting individuals read the newspapers before th sacrifice; she said to Horace Mann that to give up Parker's ministry for any other would be like going to thelarke was then preaching at Williams Hall; hearing Parker speak of him warmly, she determined to attend his s his preaching as unlike as possible to that of Theodore Parker. He had not the philosophic and militant genius of Parker, but he had a genius of his own, poetical, harmonizing. In after years I esteemed myself fortunat
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 9: no. 13
Chestnut Street
, Boston 1864; aet. 45 (search)
dinner was an early one. Picked a grouse, and saw to various matters. Company came, a little early. The room was cold. Hedge, Palfrey, and Alger to dinner. Conversation pleasant, but dinner late, and not well served. Palfrey and Hedge read Parker's Latin epitaph on Chev, amazed at the bad Latinity. In June, 1864, a Russian squadron, sent to show Russia's good — will toward the United States, dropped anchor in Boston Harbor, and hospitable Boston rose up in haste to receive the strangerth Christianity. Yet I found this very consoling, as filling out the verities of religious development. I seemed to hear in the responses a great harmony in which the first man had the extreme bass and the last born babe the extreme treble. Theo. Parker and my dear Sammy were blended in it. Soon after this the seabirds of Muscovy departed; then came the flitting to Newport, and a summer of steady work. Read Paul in the Valley. Thought of writing a review of his first two epistles fro
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 2: a Roman winter--1878-1879; aet. 59-60 (search)
e a trip up the Nile, with all its glories and discomforts. Between marvel and marvel she read Herodotus and Mariette Bey assiduously. Christmas Day. Cool wind. Native reis of the boat has a brown woollen capote over his blue cotton gown, the hood drawn over his turban. A Christmas service. Rev. Mr. Stovin, English, read the lessons for the day and the litany. We sang Nearer, my God, to Thee, and Hark, the herald angels sing. It was a good little time. My thoughts flew back to Theodore Parker, who loved this [first] hymn, and in whose meeting I first heard it. Upper deck dressed with palms — waiters in their best clothes .. . To-day visited Assiout, where we arrived soon after ten in the morning. Donkey-ride delightful, visit to the bazaar. Two very nice youths found us out, pupils of the American Mission. One of these said, I also am Christianity. Christian pupils more than one hundred. Several Moslem pupils have embraced Christianity.... This morning had a very sob
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 4:
241 Beacon Street
: the New Orleans Exposition 1883-1885; aet. 64-66 (search)
ors, each single one divided from those on either side of it by a stone partition. Francis Marion Ward, died September 3rd, 1847. Erected by William Morse, dear Marion's friend. May 16. Gave my talk to the colored people, soon after two in the afternoon in their department. A pretty hexagonal platform had been arranged. Behind this was a fine portrait of Abraham Lincoln, with a vase of beautiful flowers [gladiolus and white lilies] at its base. I spoke of Dr. Channing, Garrison, Theodore Parker, Charles Sumner, John A. Andrew, Lucretia Mott, and Wendell Phillips, occupying about an hour. They gave me a fine basket of flowers and sang my Battle Hymn. Afterwards the Alabama cadets visited us. We gave them tea, cake and biscuits and I made a little speech for them. Winter and spring passed rapidly, each season bringing fresh interest. The picturesqueness of New Orleans, the many friends she made among its people, the men and women gathered from every corner of the world, we
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 5: more changes--1886-1888; aet. 67-69 (search)
l by the teachers of the Institution. Michael was much moved and could not but be much gratified. I proposed three cheers at the end. I stole half an hour to attend a meeting in memory of Hannah Stephenson [the friend and house-mate of Theodore Parker] of whom much good was said that I did not know of. I reproached myself for having always been repelled by her ugliness of countenance and tart manner, and having thus failed to come within the sphere of her really noble influence. The occasion recalled a whole vision of the early and painful struggle in Boston; of the martyrdom of feeling endured by friends of the slave — of Parker's heroic house and pulpit. It seemed, as it often does, great to have known these things, little to have done so little in consequence. November 27. Finished my lecture on Woman in the Greek Drama. It was high time, as my head and eyes are tired with the persistent strain.... All the past week has been hard work. No pleasure reading except a very
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 6: seventy years young 1889-1890; aet. 70-71 (search)
o at three in the morning. California was once more her goal. This second visit was brief and hurried. Hurry, scurry to dress for the Forefathers' Day celebration. Oakley was my squire. I was taken down to dinner by Professor Moore, President of the occasion. ... I was suddenly and unexpectedly called for, and all were requested to rise, which was a great honor done me. I spoke of two Congregationalists whom I had known, Antoinette Blackwell, of whose ordination I told; then of Theodore Parker, of whom I said, Nothing that I have heard here is more Christian than what I heard from him. I told of his first having brought into notice the hymn, Nearer, My God, to Thee, and said that I had sung it with him; said that in advising with all women's clubs, I always urged them to include in their programmes pressing questions of the day. Was much applauded.... They then sang the Battle Hymn and we adjourned. She spent Christmas with Sister Annie, in great contentment; her last wo
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