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Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 161 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 156 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 116 2 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 76 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 71 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 49 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 47 1 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 36 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 33 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson 32 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book. You can also browse the collection for Theodore Parker or search for Theodore Parker in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 5 document sections:

Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, V (search)
unal is at best but a court of appeal, and is commonly valuable in proportion as the courts of preliminary jurisdiction have done their duty. The best preparation for going abroad is to know the worth of what one has seen at home. I remember to have been impressed with a little sense of dismay, on first nearing the shores of Europe, at the thought of what London and Paris might show me in the way of great human personalities; but I said to myself, To one who has heard Emerson lecture, and Parker preach, and Garrison thunder, and Phillips persuade, there is no reason why Darwin or Victor Hugo should pass for more than mortal; and accordingly they did not. We shall not prepare ourselves for a cosmopolitan standard by ignoring our own great names or undervaluing the literary tradition that has produced them. When Stuart Newton, the artist, was asked, on first arriving in London from America, whether he did not enjoy the change, he answered honestly, I here see such society occasionall
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, VII (search)
VII On literary tonics some minor English critic wrote lately of Dr. Holmes's Life of Emerson: The Boston of his day does not seem to have been a very strong place; we lack performance. This is doubtless to be attributed rather to ignorance than to that want of seriousness which Mr. Stedman so justly points out among the younger Englishmen. The Boston of which he speaks was the Boston of Garrison and Phillips, of Whittier and Theodore Parker; it was the headquarters of those old-time abolitionists of whom the English Earl of Carlisle wrote that they were fighting a battle without a parallel in the history of ancient or modern heroism. It was also the place which nurtured those young Harvard students who are chronicled in the Harvard Memorial Biographies—those who fell in the war of the Rebellion; those of whom Lord Houghton once wrote tersely to me: They are men whom Europe has learned to honor and would do well to imitate. The service of all these men, and its results, gi
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, XIII (search)
fter reading those of Emerson or Lowell or Thoreau, without noticing in the younger trio a somewhat narrowed range of allusion and illustration; a little deficiency in that mellow richness of soil which can be made only out of the fallen leaves of many successive vegetations; a want, in fact, of background. It is to be readily admitted that there is no magic in a college, and that any writer who has a vast love of knowledge may secure his background for himself, as did, for example, Theodore Parker. Yet he cannot obtain it without what is, in some sense, the equivalent of a college; long early years spent in various studies, and especially in those liberal pursuits formerly known as the Humanities. No doubt there is much material accessible in other ways, as by wide travel, or even in the forecastle or on a ranch. But, after all, the main preservative of knowledge is in the art of printing; and while the merely bookish man may never make a writer, there is nothing that so enric
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, XVIII (search)
rgest. The actual table, arranged in order of pre-eminence, is as follows, the number following each name representing the number of books, or parts of books, referring to the person named, and enumerated in the Cleveland catalogue. The actual works of the author himself are not included. The list is as follows:— Washington.48 Emerson, Lincoln (each)41 Franklin 37 Webster34 Longfellow33 Hawthorne25 Jefferson23 Grant22 Irving21 Clay19 Beecher, Poe, M. F. Ossoli (each)16 Theodore Parker, Lowell (each)15 John Adams, Sumner (each)14 Cooper, Greeley, Sheridan, Sherman (each)12 Everett11 John Brown, Channing, Farragut (each)10 Garrison, Hamilton, Prescott, Seward, Taylor (each) 9 Thoreau7 Bancroft6 Allston5 Edwards, Motley (each)5 This list certainly offers to the reader some surprises in its details, but it must impress every one, after serious study, as giving a demonstration of real intelligence and catholicity of taste in the nation whose literature it re
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, Index (search)
ble, 222. Mozart, W. A., 188. Miller, Max, 171. Murfree, Mary N., 11, 58. N. Newton, Sir, Isaac, 125. Newton, Stuart, 49. New World and New Book, the, 1. Nichol, John, 61. Niebuhr, B. G., 4. Novalis, see Hardenberg. Norton, C. E., 179, 180, 208. O. Ossoli, Margaret Fuller, 9, 27, 90, 96, 155, 176. Ossian, 52. Osten-Sacken, Baron, 173. Oxenstiern, Chancellor, 89. P. Palmer, G. H., 148. Paris, limitations of, 82. Paris, the world's capital, 77. Parker, Theodore, 42, 62, 115,155. Parkman, Francis, 60, 61. Parton, James, 13. Pattison, Mark, 50. Paul, Jean, see Richter. Pepys, Samuel, 42. Perry, Lillah Cabot, 219, Petrarch, Francesco, 172, 179, 185, 186, 187. Philip of Burgundy, 6. Phillips, Wendell, 7, 49, 62, 221, 222. Plato, 48, 114. Plot, the proposed abolition of, 135. Plutarch, 4, 174. Poe, E. A., 66, 155, 190, 219. Popkin, J. S., 117, 169, 171, 172, 174. Posterity, a contemporaneous, 51. Precision, weapons of, 1