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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 11 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 3 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 3 1 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 24, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for William A. Parker or search for William A. Parker in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Closing operations in the James River. (search)
s Reach. The Fredericksburg passed safely through the obstructions, but the Virginia and Richmond ran aground. At daybreak they were discovered, and fire was opened on them from Fort Parsons, the Federal battery near by. The Onondaga, Captain William A. Parker, which, on the approach of the enemy, had retired down the river, according to the statement of Captain Parker, to obtain an advantageous position, now returned and joined in the attack. With the flood-tide the two iron-clads were floaCaptain Parker, to obtain an advantageous position, now returned and joined in the attack. With the flood-tide the two iron-clads were floated off, and withdrew up the river. The Drewry and one of the torpedo launches were destroyed. The armor of the Virginia was penetrated. That night the Confederate squadron came down again with the intention of attacking the Onondaga, but retired after meeting with a warm reception from the batteries on the banks. From a brief narrative furnished to the editors by Chief Engineer Alexander Henderson, U. S. N., the following statement is condensed: At this time [January 23d, 1865] I wa