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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 23 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for William Hamar Parker or search for William Hamar Parker in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
facts to be known. H. B. Littlepage. Washington, Feb. 21. The following letter from Captain W. H. Parker to the Norfolk Landmark, is also an interesting and unanswerable statement of the questioiew of the facts above cited, in my humble opinion, preposterous. Very respectfully, &c., Wm. H. Parker. Note.—The Merrimac was christened the Virginia by the Confederate authorities; but I hoes the claim that the Monitor whipped the Merrimac on that occasion stand? Respectfully, Wm. H. Parker. The Army of Tennessee. By Colonel Wm. Preston Johnston. [The following eloquent respilenced We were accompanied from the yard by the gunboats Beaufort, Lieutenant-Commander W. H Parker, and Raleigh, LieutenantCom-mander J. W. Alexander. As soon as the firing was heard up James rito which these defects of the Parrott projectiles sometimes went: at the siege of Knoxville, Captain Parker's battery of four captured Parrott rifles fired one hundred and twenty shell at the enemy's
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Merrimac and Monitor. (search)
d that honor may be done to whom honor is due, I simply desire the facts to be known. H. B. Littlepage. Washington, Feb. 21. The following letter from Captain W. H. Parker to the Norfolk Landmark, is also an interesting and unanswerable statement of the question: Letter from Captain Parker. Norfolk, Va., December 11, 1882Merrimac, thus saving Washington and New York, &c., &c., is, in view of the facts above cited, in my humble opinion, preposterous. Very respectfully, &c., Wm. H. Parker. Note.—The Merrimac was christened the Virginia by the Confederate authorities; but I have preferred in this article to give her the name she was best kny Island. I have the honor to be, your very obedient servant, G. J. Van Brunt, Captain U. S. N. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Assuming, Mr. Editor, the account of Captain Van Brunt to be correct, how does the claim that the Monitor whipped the Merrimac on that occasion stand? Respectfully, Wm. H. Parker
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Services of the Virginia (Merrimac). (search)
was slight. Their fire appeared to have been aimed at our ports. Had it been concentrated at the water-line we would have been seriously hurt, if not sunk. Owing to the ebb tide and our great draft we could not close with the Congress without first going up stream and then turning, which was a tedious operation, besides subjecting us twice to the full fire of the batteries, some of which we silenced We were accompanied from the yard by the gunboats Beaufort, Lieutenant-Commander W. H Parker, and Raleigh, LieutenantCom-mander J. W. Alexander. As soon as the firing was heard up James river, the Patrick Henry, Commander John R Tucker, Jamestown, Lieutenant Commander J. N. Barney, and the gunboat Teaser, Lieutenant-Commander W. A. Webb, under command of Captain John R. Tucker, stood down the river, joining us about four o'clock. All these vessels were gallantly fought and handled, and rendered valuable and effective service. The prisoners from the Congress stated that when on b
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Confederate Artillery service. (search)
e condemned were better than none. The causes of the premature explosions were never fully understood. They were generally attributed to defects in the casting, which either allowed the flame of the discharge to enter the shell, or by weakening the shell caused it to crush under the shock of the discharge and the twist given by the grooves of the gun. As a single illustration of the extent to which these defects of the Parrott projectiles sometimes went: at the siege of Knoxville, Captain Parker's battery of four captured Parrott rifles fired one hundred and twenty shell at the enemy's batteries and pontoon-bridge, of which only two failed to tumble, or to burst prematurely. Of the most valuable kind of rifle ammunition, shrapnel, the Confederates made none, on account of the scarcity of lead. Of the next most useful kind, percussion shell, (invaluable for getting the range,) few were to be had until the last year of the war. The fuse then used, Girardey's, was excellent, prob
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Confederate Artillery at Second Manassas and Sharpsburg. (search)
hed to Evans's Brigade.—Boyce's South Carolina Battery (Macbeth Artillery)—(1). Attached to Anderson's Division, (Major Saunders, Chief of Artillery).—Huger's Battery; Moorman's; Grimes's—(3). There were also present, not assigned to special infantry commands: Washington Artillery, Colonel J: B. Walton.—Squire's (First Company); Richardson's (Second Company); Miller's (Third Company); Eshleman's (Fourth Company)—(4). Lee's Battalion, Colonel S. D. Lee.—Eubank's Battery; Jordan's; Parker's; Rhett's; Taylor's—(5). With the Cavalry under J. E. B. Stuart.—Pelham's Battery; Hart's (?)—(2). The following may have been present, but their assignments are not known to me: Leake's; Rogers' (Loudoun Artillery); Stribling's (Fauquier Artillery)—(3). There came up, after Second Manassas, from Richmond— Of the Reserve Artillery, five or six companies of Brown's First Virginia Regiment—Dance's (Powhatan Artillery); Hupp's (Salem Artillery);
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee at Lexington, Va., June 28th, 1883. (search)
ames are these that shine on the rolls of the alumni of this honored Alma Mater! Church and State, Field and Forum, Bar and Bench, Hospital and Counting-Room, Lecture-Room and Pulpit—what famous champions and teachers of the right, what trusty workers and leaders in literature and law, and arts, and arms, have they not found in her sons! Seven Governors of States—amongst them Crittenden, of Kentucky, and McDowell, Letcher, and Kemper, of Virginia; eleven United States Senators—amongst them Parker, of Virginia, Breckinridge, of Kentucky, H. S. Foote, of Mississippi, and William C. Preston, of South Carolina; more than a score of congressmen, twoscore and more of Judges—amongst them Trimble, of the United States Supreme Court; Coalter, Allen, Anderson, and Burks, of the Court of Appeals of Virginia; twelve or more college presidents, and amongst them Moses Hoge and Archibald Alexander, of Hampden-Sidney, James Priestly, of Cumberland College, Tennessee, and G. A. Baxter and Henry Ruf
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Literary notices. (search)
bted to the enlightened liberality of W. W. Corcoran, Esqr., for their possession of these papers and their ability to use them, and they have very properly accompanied the volume with a fine likeness of the great philanthropist, and his autograph letter making the valuable gift. The few extra copies for sale will, of course, be bought up at once, as no historic collection could be called complete without the Dinwiddie Papers. recollections of A naval officer. 1841-1865. By Captain William Hamar Parker. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons. We have received, with the compliments of the author, through West, Johnston & Co., Richmond, this beautifully gotten up book, and have time and space now only to say that a slight dipping into its pages shows conclusively that our gallant Confederate tar knows how to wield a pen as well as how to sail or fight a ship, and has produced a book of rare interest and decided historic value. We mean to give it a careful reading, and shall hereaf