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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 16., Distinguished guests and residents of Medford. (search)
by his king and country? And now his Family is needy. Perhaps this obituary was written by some partisan friend or loving relative in whose eyes the act seemed greater than in those of the writers who have omitted to mention Tufts' name. Parkman, who will be spoken of later, covers the period of this war in his Half Century of Conflict, and truly no historical writing can be more simple, more charming, or more complete in detail of facts, and for pleasant and interesting reading I comme the attention of our school children. In 1871 this newspaper account was reprinted in full in an article where the story was told again for the public, and since that time it has been given by successive writers with the youth's name, though Parkman suggests that the act was over exploited. It has been written for young readers by another author and I hope the boys and girls will know all the history concerning William Tufts and also of the events in which he took part. When the news of
from Francis Parkman (written in 1845) relating to a navy surgeon at Medford, followed by the editor's query, Who was he? Mr. Francis Wait writes, referring to Parkman's stay in Medford: In those days a Colonel Jaques lived at Ten Hills Farm-house, which was a short distance over the line in Charlestown (now Somerville) an but never excelled. In this vicinity and in Middlesex Fells, in the hunting season, his bugle call was daily heard. Colonel Jaques died March 27, 1859. Mr. Parkman was in error as to the colonel's residing in Medford. His home, the old Temple mansion in Charlestown (now Somerville) was demolished in 1877, and much of its colonel's residing in Medford. His home, the old Temple mansion in Charlestown (now Somerville) was demolished in 1877, and much of its elevated site was used in filling the marsh land along the Mystic. Being so near the border it was a natural error for Mr. Parkman to fall into, as may be seen by the observations we have noted.