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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Parks in the United States. (search)
Parks in the United States. The development of the park system, national, state, and civic, in the United States, is recent, though Boston had its Common, part of a purchase for a cow pasture in 1634, and since 1878 protected from encroachment by law. Interest in public parks was created by the papers of A. J. Downing in 1849, and led to the establishment of Central Park (862 acres) in the city of New York in 1857. The most important national parks or reservations in the United States are: Yosemite Park and Mariposa Grove, on the Merced River in Mariposa county, Cal., discovered in 1851, and established by Congress1864 Yellowstone National Park, 3,575 square miles, nearly all in northwestern Wyoming, established by act of CongressMay 1, 1872 A State forestry commission was appointed by New York State for the preservation of the Adirondack forest1885 State reservation at Niagara Falls opened to the publicJuly 15, 1885
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Printing-press, the (search)
sheet. Difficulties that at first appeared have been overcome, and now the press used for a great daily newspaper will print the paper on both sides and fold, ready for delivery, at the rate of 96,000 four-page or 48,000 eight-page sheets per hour. Printing was introduced into the thirteen original States of the United States by the following named persons at the time and place noted: MassachusettsCambridgeStephen Day1639 VirginiaWilliamsburgJohn Buckner1680-82 Pennsylvanianear PhiladelphiaWilliam Bradford1685 New YorkNew York CityWilliam Bradford1693 ConnecticutNew LondonThomas Short1709 MarylandAnnapolisWilliam Parks1726 South CarolinaCharlestonEleazer Phillips1730 Rhode IslandNewportJames Franklin1732 New JerseyWoodbridgeJames Parker1751 North CarolinaNew-BerneJames Davis1749 New HampshirePortsmouthDaniel Fowle1756 DelawareWilmingtonJames Adams1761 GeorgiaSavannahJames Johnston1762 The first book published in America was issued in 1536 in the city of Mexico.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Maryland, (search)
f learning, and erecting schools in the several counties of the province, under which law a public free school was established at Battle Creek, Calvert county......1723 A complete collection of the laws of Maryland, printed at Annapolis by William Parks......1727 First newspaper printed in Maryland, the Maryland gazette, published at Annapolis by William Parks......1727 Baltimore laid out on lands belonging to Charles Carroll, by commissioners appointed by the legislature......1730 William Parks......1727 Baltimore laid out on lands belonging to Charles Carroll, by commissioners appointed by the legislature......1730 Agreement entered into that the boundary between Maryland and Delaware should be that fixed by the decree of 1685, and that between Maryland and Pennsylvania a line drawn due west, 15 miles south of Philadelphia......1732 Charles Carroll, of Carrollton, born at Annapolis......Sept. 20, 1737 Legislature appropriates £ 7,562 to meet the expense of raising and equipping 500 volunteers for the great expedition against the Spanish dominions......1740 Treaty concluded with the Six Nations b
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Virginia, (search)
jamin Franklin is appointed postmaster of Pennsylvania......1730 First settler in the Shenandoah Valley, Joist Hite, who takes up 40,000 acres and enters upon possession with a party from Pennsylvania......1732 Richard Henry Lee, born at Stratford, on the Potomac......Jan. 20, 1732 George Washington, born at Westmoreland county......Feb. 22, 1732 Patrick Henry, born at Studley, Hanover county......May 29, 1736 First newspaper in Virginia, the Virginia Gazette, published by William Parks, appears at Williamsburg......August, 1736 Richmond settled by William Byrd......1739 Virginia raises a regiment to assist in the reduction of Carthagena, West Indies. Lawrence Washington, half-brother of George Washington, is a captain in it, embarking......1740 Mount Vernon, named by Lawrence Washington after Admiral Vernon, who commanded the fleet against Carthagena......1740 George Whitefield comes to Virginia......1740 Richmond incorporated......1742 Augustine Was
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 7: colonial newspapers and magazines, 1704-1775 (search)
al) of Otway's Orphan, Farquhar's Recruiting officer, and other popular plays of the period which were given at the Charleston theatres for twenty or thirty years before the first wandering professional companies began to play in the Northern colonies. Here, too, we find in the issue of 8 February, 1735, what is probably the first recorded prologue composed in the colonies. Early theatrical notices may also be followed in The Virginia gazette, a paper of unusual excellence, edited by William Parks in Williamsburg, the old capital of Virginia. Here The busy-body, The Recruiting officer, and The Beaux-Stratagem were all performed, often by amateurs, though professionals were known as early as 1716 in Williamsburg. Life in Williamsburg in 1736 had a more cosmopolitan quality than in other towns. A sprightly essay-serial called The Monitor, which fills the first page of The Virginia gazette for twenty-two numbers, probably reflects not only the social life of the capital, but also
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
27, 128, 129, Otway, 116, 117 Ouabi, or the virtues of nature, 178 Over-soul, the, 336, 352 Ovid, 16 Owen, Robert, 339 Owen, Robert Dale, 225 P Paine, Robert Treat, Jr., 178-179 Paine, Thomas, 74, 77, 91, 99, 102, 123, 140 1, 142, 4, 144, 67 Pamela, 64, 284 Pamphlets on the Constitution, 148 n. Papers on literature and art, 343 Paradise lost, 265, 274 Pardey, Henry 0., 230 Parker, Theodore, 333, 340, 344-345, 347 Parkinson, Richard, 190, 206 Parks, William, 117 Parmenius, Stephen, 3 Parnassus, 276 Parnell, Thomas, 177 Partisan, the, 314, 315 Partisan leader, 312 Past, the, 270 Pathfinder, the, 209, 303 Patriot's appeal, 167 Paul and Alexis, 231 Paul Jones, the, 183 Paulding, James Kirke, 208, 238-239, 240, 247, 262, 278, 307, 308, 310, 311, 319 Pauw, 188, 207 Payne, John Howard, 220, 224, 231 Peabody, Elizabeth, 333, 341 Peabody, Sophia, 333 Peasant of Auburn, 163 Peck, John M., 190 Pelayo, 317 Pen
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
vation of our cosmopolitan capital. In no wise accidentally, as in large measure is to be said of Boston at a later period, was Philadelphia our chief centre of publication as the Republic began its political career. In the meanwhile in this germinal eighteenth century other colonies had been making a beginning. One of the most influential of these, Virginia, had possibly seen an issue from her press as early as 1682, but at any rate it is fully authenticated that from 1730 to 1737 William Parks was under contract by the governments of Virginia and Maryland to maintain printing presses at Annapolis and at Williamsburg. The dates for the establishment of presses in other colonies and states most noteworthy in the annals of our early publishing are, according to the best authorities, Connecticut, 1709; Rhode Island, 1727; South Carolina, 1732; Kentucky, 1787; Thomas says 1786. and Ohio, 1793. Under modern conditions these dates would mean little or nothing, save perhaps tha
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
lmer, W. J., 57 Pamela, 538 Panama, a personal record of forty-six years, 162 Panama massacre, the, 162 Panegyricus, 460, 465 Pan in Wall Street, 46, 47 Papias and his contemporaries, 207 Papst, F., 589 Paradise lost, 487 Paragraphs on Banks, 432 Parisian romance, a, 278 Park, John, 445 Parker, Lottie Blair, 290 Parker, Louis N., 296 Parker, Samuel, 136, 137 Parker, Theodore, 119, 228 Parkman, F., 89, 135, 171, 178, 180, 188, 189-91, 192, 196, 200, 472 Parks, Wm., 537 Parlement of Foules, 485 Parlor Match, a, 279 Parr, Samuel, 453, 454 Parry, Dr., 157 Parsons, Thomas William, 38, 52 Passe Rose, 86 Passionate Pilgrim, the, 103 Pastor, Tony, 272 Pastorius, F. D., 572-73 Past, the present, the future, the, 435 Pater, Walter, 107, 261, 377 Pathetic Symphony, the, 49 Path to Riches, the, 430 Pattee, F. L., 75 n. Patten, S. N., 442 Patterson, Medill, 294 Paul, 469 Paul Kauvar, 277 Paul Patoff, 88 Payne, J. H., 49
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.24 (search)
rman, Dec. 9, ‘63. Aug. 31, ‘63, Forrest's Regiment Cavalry. Cole, William R. or J., Assistant Surgeon, appointed by Secretary of War 31st Aug. 63, to rank from 10th June ‘63. Ordered to report to Medical-Director. Passed Board at Shelbyville June 10, ‘63, to report to J. G. R., Assistant Medical-Director, headquarters A. T., Aug. 11, 63, ordered to report to General Wheeler. Aug. 31, ‘63, White's Battery. Colbert, Chales B., Surgeon, May 31, ‘63, Hospital at Pulaski. Clower, William Parks, Surgeon, Aug. 31, ‘63, 29th Georgia Regiment headquarters, Nov. 16, ‘63, April 30, ‘64, 29th Georgia Regiment. Cosby, Thomas R., promoted to Assistant Surgeon, appointed by Secretary of War Nov.,‘61, rank from same day. Passed Board at Jackson, Miss., Aug. 31, ‘63, 1st Battalion, Georgia Sharpshooters. Passed Board at Charleston as Surgeon March 31, ‘64, headquarters A. T., Dalton, April 5, ‘64, April 30, 64, 32d Mississippi. Crombie, A. C., Assistant Surgeon,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.32 (search)
transferred. Jerry Kelly, dead. Henry Kelly, dead. William King. Thomas King. David Kimberlin. David McCrut, killed. John McElhany, dead. Samuel McCloud, killed. Hugh Mutter, dead. Hensley Mead, dead. Charles McElha, dead. Jacob Mitchem. Hugh Mongumery, killed. Thomas Morton. John McFaden, dead. Joseph McCarthy, dead. John McCloud. Henry Moore. Harry Mays, dead. C. W. Powers. Calvin Powers, wounded. William Powers, dead. William Parks. G. W. Seacott. James Shell, killed. Isaac Shell, wounded. John Sawyers. William Sawyers, dead. Samuel Southerland. Riley Smith, dead. J. H. Sullivan. Armstrong Skenes. Henry Steel. George Smith, killed. J. S. Vermilion, killed. Charles Whetsel, killed. Benjamin Whetsel, dead. John Williams, killed. Thomas Wilson, wounded; dead. S. H. Wyett. The foregoing roll was made from memory by C. B. Price, a member of the old company, who now resides