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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 26 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 6 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 2 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Brooklyn at the passage of the forts. (search)
his sudden disappearance, until I asked the quartermaster, who was leadsman in the chains, if he had seen him fall. Why, yes, sir, said he, I saw him fall overboard,--in fact, I helped him; for I hit him alongside of the head with my hand-lead. No guns were fired at the ram from the starboard battery; all the crews a moment before had been at the port guns. As the Manassas drifted by I ran up on the poop, calling the gun's crew with me, to see if I could hit her with the 30-pounder Parrott, but we were unable to depress it sufficiently, at its high elevation, to bring it to bear before she was lost to sight in the smoke. The shot which she had fired came through the chain and planking, above the berth-deck, through a pile of rigging placed against the ship's side, and just entered the sand-bags placed to protect the steam-drum. A few moments after this incident a vessel passed on our starboard side, not ten feet from us, and I could see through the port the men loading a
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Stonewall Jackson in the Shenandoah. (search)
brigade] will cross the river at daybreak and attack Shields on the Lewis farm [two miles below]. I shall support him with all the other troops as fast as they can be put in line. General Dick Taylor will move through the woods on the side of the mountain with his Louisiana brigade, and rush upon their left flank by the time the action becomes general. By 10 o'clock we shall get them on the run, and I'll now tell you what I want with you. Send the big new rifle-gun you have [a 12-pounder Parrott] to Poague [commander of the Rockbridge artillery] and let your mounted men report to the cavalry. I want you in person to By Major Jed. Hotchkiss, top. Eng. Valley Dist. A. N. Va. Pennsylvania “bucktails.” Colonel Johnson, mounted. The first Maryland (Confederate) regiment at Harrisonburg, June 6, 1862, and the death of Ashby. In the affair of the rear-guard at Harrisonburg on the 6th of June, 1862, the 1st Maryland Regiment, Colonel (afterward General) Bradley T. Johnson, was o
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Iuka and Corinth. (search)
io; Marion A. Ross, Executed. Co. A, 2d Ohio; Perry G. Shadrack, Executed. Co. K, 2d Ohio; Samuel Slavens, Executed. 33d Ohio; Samuel Robinson, Executed. Co. G, 33d Ohio; John Scott, Executed. Co. K, 21st Ohio ; Wilson W. Brown, Escaped. Co. F, 21st Ohio; William Knight, Escaped. Co. E, 21st Ohio; Mark Wood, Escaped. Co. C, 21st Ohio; James A. Wilson, Escaped. Co. C, 21st Ohio; John Wollam, Escaped. Co. C, 33d Ohio; D. A. Dorsey, Escaped. Co. H, 33d Ohio; Jacob Parrott, Exchanged. Co. K, 33d Ohio; Robert Buffum, Exchanged. Co. II, 21st Ohio; William Bensinger, Exchanged. Co. G, 21st Ohio; William Reddick, Exchanged. Co. B, 33d Ohio; E. H. Mason,: Exchanged. Co. K, 21st Ohio; William Pittenger, Exchanged. Co. G, 2d Ohio.--Editors. The others were Memorial day at Chattanooga, 1883. Graves of Andrews and his companions. never brought to trial, probably because of the advance of Union forces and the consequent confusion into which the
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 11: operations in Southern Tennessee and Northern Mississippi and Alabama. (search)
ked men, Two of these (Andrews and Campbell) were civilians, and citizens of Kentucky; the remainder were soldiers, selected from the Second, Twenty-first, and Thirty-third Ohio regiments of volunteers, Sill's brigade. Their names were as follows: J. J. Andrews, William Campbell, George D. Wilson, Marion A. Ross, Perry G. Shadrack, Samuel Slavens, Samuel Robinson, John Scott, W. W. Brown, William Knight, J. R. Porter, Mark Wood, J. A. Wilson, M. J. Hawkins, John Wollam, D. A. Dorsey, Jacob Parrott, robert Buffum, William Bensinger, William Reddick, E. H. Mason, William Pettinger. led by J. J. Andrews, who had been for several months in the secret service under General Buell. He had proposed the expedition to Buell at Nashville, and that officer directed General Mitchel, then at Murfreesboro, to furnish him with the means for carrying it out. Letter of General Buell to the adjutant-general, August, 1863. Mitchel did so with alacrity, for it promised to be of vast service to him
iana, Colonel Say, and to Lieutenant-Colonel Munday, First Battalion of Kentucky Cavalry, to prepare four days rations and be ready to move on the following morning. Captain Wetmore's Ninth Ohio Battery was also ordered to have one section (two Parrott guns) in readiness to accompany the command. The whole force amounted to some 2,300 men. Proper guards were left at this place and in the several camps. On the morning of the 21st we marched toward Cumberland Gap, with the hope of arrivinghing on our part was admirably performed by companies of the Sixteenth Ohio. Quite a number of the enemy were shot by them. The rebels opened on our skirmishers with shrapnel from two 12-pounders, but without doing any damage. I moved the two Parrott guns and three regiments to a ridge in the front of the Gap, where the former were placed in position and soon opened on the rebel works, and continued cannonading them until the afternoon. Our fire was returned warmly from seven different work
ations will soon have an influence upon your designs, and it is therefore better for you to run no risk at present. James B. Fry, Colonel and Chief of Staff. [inclosure no. 7.] headquarters Seventh Division, Army of the Ohio, At Parrott's, East Tenn., June 10, 1862. Major-General Buell: General: I had the honor to receive your telegram. It was too late to change my plans. I have advanced upon a road so narrow that two wagons cannot pass each other. The guns had to be drawforage for 30, 40, and 50 miles, and at last from a distance of 80 and 90 miles. It was under such circumstances that I concentrated and organized the Seventh Division. I found six guns, and increased the number to twenty-two, four of which are Parrott siege guns. A floating bridge was built upon the Cumberland River by Lieutenant Edge, of the Sixteenth Ohio, under the supervision of Colonel De Courcy, and means were adopted to supply the troops with fresh meat, which some of them had not tas
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 7-12, 1862.--raid on Confederate line of communications between Chattanooga, Tenn., and Marietta, Ga. (search)
nying depositions of Corp. William Pittenger, Company G, Second Regiment OhioVolunteers; Private Jacob Parrott, Company K, Thirtythird Regiment Ohio Volunteers; Private Robert Buffum, Company H, Twenhunt down the fugitive slaves of the South. The whole 22 were captured. Among them was Private Jacob Parrott of Company K, Thirty-third Regiment Ohio Volunteers. When arrested he was, without any hey could devise. Three times in the progress of this horrible flogging it was suspended and Mr. Parrott was asked if he would not confess, but steadily and firmly to the last he refused all disclos Pittenger, Second Ohio Regiment. Wm. H. Reddick, Jno. Wollam, D. A. Dorsey, M. J. Hawkins, Jacob Parrott, Thirty-third Ohio Regiment. All of Sill's brigade, Buell's division. Respectfullyalers. 1. M. J. Hawkins. 9. Elihu Mason. 2. William H. Reddick. 10. W. W. Brown. 3. Jacob Parrott. 11. William Knight. 4. D. A. Dorsey. 12. Robert Buffum. 5. W. Bensinger. 13. William
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
The order to cease firing having been given the artillery, Captain Williams, by your direction, fired three 30-pounder Parrott shells into Corinth, which we subsequently learned fell into the center of the village, killing a railroad engineer and em a volley that started them scampering in all directions for the cover of the woods. I then brought down two of Dees' Parrott guns and threw a dozen shells into Corinth. The two men of the Eleventh Missouri were badly wounded. We could not loads to the left of Farmington. The pickets were driven in about half a mile upon the left of Corinth road, and several Parrott shells were fired at a point where Colonel Elliott supposed their grand-guard headquarters to be. This had the effect tos position was held by a small brigade of the enemy. My preliminary arrangements having thus been made, two 20-pdr. Parrott rifled guns, of Silfversparre's battery, under the immediate supervision of Major Taylor, chief of artillery, were moved
diness under a galling fire and for the alacrity displayed in obeying every command. The above is respectfully submitted. H. A. Hambright, Colonel Seventy-ninth Pa. Vols., Comdg. U. S. Forces. Brig. Gen. J. S. Negley, Comdg. Division U. S. Forces. No. 4.-reports of Maj. Gen. E. Kirby Smith, C. S. Army. headquarters Department of East Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn., June 8, 1862. The enemy opposite Chattanooga in considerable force. Opened yesterday at 5 p. m. with 40-inch Parrott guns. Firing ceased at noon to-day. Boats on the river secured. Mitchel is reported re-enforced from Corinth, and is acting in concert with General Morgan from Kentucky. His plans not yet developed. My little force in position to be concentrated, but entirely inadequate to hold the department. E. Kirby Smith, Major-General, Commanding. Capt. W. H. Taylor, A. A. G., Richmond, Va. Knoxville, Tenn., June 10, 1862. General Mitchel retired from before Chattanooga Monday. His