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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing forces at Fort Donelson, Tenn. (search)
loss: k, 69; w, 340; m, 20=429. Third Brigade, Col. John Cook: 7th Ill., Lieut.-Col. Andrew J. Babcock; 50th Ill., Col. Moses M. Bane; 52d Ind., Col. James M. Smith; 12th Iowa, Col. J. J. Woods; 13th Mo., Col. Crafts J. Wright; Batteries D, H, and K, 1st Mo. Lt. Artillery, Capts. Henry Richardson, F. Welker, and George H. Stone. Brigade loss: k, 10; w, 109; m, 2 = 121. Fourth Brigade, Col. Jacob G. Lauman: 25th Ind., Col. James C. Veatch; 2d Iowa, Col. James M. Tuttle; 7th Iowa, Lieut.-Col. James C. Parrott; 14th Iowa, Col. William T. Shaw; Birge's Mo. Sharp-shooters. Brigade loss: k, 55; w, 301; m, 1 = 357. Fifth Brigade, Col. Morgan L. Smith: 11th Ind., Col. George F. McGinnis; 8th Mo., Major John McDonald. Brigade-loss: k, 11; w, 69 = 80. Third division, Brig.-Gen. Lew Wallace. First Brigade, Col. Charles Cruft: 31st Ind., Lieut.-Col. John Osborn, Major Fred. Arm; 44th Ind., Col. Hugh B. Reed; 17th Ky., Col. John H. McHenry, Jr.; 25th Ky., Col. James M. Shackelford. Brigade
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing forces at Shiloh. (search)
. Cavalry, Capt. E. Carmichael. Brigade loss: k, 96; w, 393; m, 46 =-535. Unattached: Stewart's Co. Ill. Cav., Lieut. Ezra King; D, 1st Ill. Artillery, Capt. Edward McAllister (w); E, 2d Ill. Artillery, Lieut. George L. Nispel; 14th Ohio Battery, Capt. J. B. Burrows (w). Unattached loss: k, 5; w, 35 = 40. Second division, Brig.-Gen. W. H. L. Wallace (m w), Col. James M. Tuttle. Staff loss: w, 1. First Brigade, Col. James M. Tuttle: 2d Iowa, Lieut.-Col. James Baker; 7th Iowa, Lieut.-Col. James C. Parrott; 12th Iowa, Col. Joseph J. Woods (w), Capt. Samuel R. Edgington; 14th Iowa, Col. William T. Shaw. Brigade loss: k, 39; w, 143; m, 676 = 858. (A number of the captured or missing were also wounded.) Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John McArthur (w), Col. Thomas Morton: 9th Ill., Col. August Mersy; 12th Ill., Lieut.-Col. Augustus L. Chetlain, Capt. James R. Hugunin; 81st Ohio, Col. Thomas Morton; 13th Mo., Col. Crafts J. Wright; 14th Mo. (Birge's Sharp-shooters), Col. B. S. Compton. B
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 1.1 (search)
hly handled, and at such close range, that she dropped anchor and surrendered. Her armament consisted of one 30-pounder Parrott and eight 8-inch heavy Columbiads. Her crew was of 11 officers and 108 men. Upon examination the damage she had sustainandon their pieces,--three 8-inch navy shell guns, two 8-inch sea-coast howitzers, one rifled 24-pounder, one 30-pounder Parrott, one 12-pounder Whitworth, three 10-inch sea-coast mortars,--eleven in all, and fall back. Two companies of the 7th From a work which was called the Swamp Angel, because of the spot where it had been erected, the enemy, with an 8-inch Parrott rifle-gun, and before receiving my answer, did open fire upon the heart of the city. I have reason to believe, however,ess loss of the garrisons of both Wagner and Gregg. The enemy's sap had reached the moat of the former work. The heavy Parrott shells used against its parapets had breached them and knocked away the bomb-proofs. It had become impossible to repair
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Atlanta campaign. May 3d-September 8th, 1864. (search)
d Ill., Lieut.-Col. Edwin A. Bowen; 66th Ind., Lieut.-Col. Roger Martin, Maj. Thomas G. Morrison, Capt. Alfred Morris; 2d Iowa, Col. James B. Weaver, Lieut.-Col. Noel B. toward, Maj. Mathew G. Hamill, Capt. John A. Duckworth; 7th Iowa, Lieut.-Col. James C. Parrott, Maj. James W. McMullin, Lieut.-Col. J. C. Parrott, Maj. J. W. McMullin, Capt. Samuel Mahon. Second Brigade, Col. Patrick E. Burke, Lieut.-Col. Robert N. Adams, Col. August Mersy, Lieut.-Col. Jesse J. Phillips, Col. Robert N. Adams: 9tLieut.-Col. J. C. Parrott, Maj. J. W. McMullin, Capt. Samuel Mahon. Second Brigade, Col. Patrick E. Burke, Lieut.-Col. Robert N. Adams, Col. August Mersy, Lieut.-Col. Jesse J. Phillips, Col. Robert N. Adams: 9th Ill. (mounted), Lieut.-Col. Jesse J. Phillips, Maj. John H. Kuhn, Capt. Samuel T. Hughes; 12th Ill., Maj. James R. Hugunin, Lieut.-Col. Henry Van Sellar; 66th Ill., Maj. Andrew K. Campbell, Capt. William S. Boyd; 81st Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Robt. N. Adams, Maj. Frank Evans, Lieut.-Col. R. N. Adams, Capt. Noah Stoker, Capt. William C. Henry. Third Brigade (at Rome from May 22d), Col. Moses M. Bane, Brig.-Gen. William Vandever, Col. H. J. B. Cummings, Col. Richard Rowett: 7th Ill. (joined July 9th),
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Mississippi flotilla in the Red River expedition. (search)
100-pounder Parrotts, 2 24-pounder howitzers, 2 12-pounder howitzers. Choctaw, Lieut.-Com. F. M. Ramsay, 1 100-pounder Parrott, 3 9-inch, 2 30-pounder Parrotts, 2 12-pounder howitzers. Chillicothe, Act. V. Lieut. Joseph P. Couthouy, Lieut.-Com. W. V. Lieut. George W. Brown, 2 11-inch, 1 12-pounder rifled howitzer. Louisville, Lieut.-Com. E. K. Owen, 1 100-pounder Parrott, 4 9-inch, 2 30-pounder Parrotts, 4 32-pounders. Carondelet, Lieut.-Com. J. G. Mitchell, 2 100-pounder Parrotts, 3 9-inounder Parrotts, 4 9-inch, 2 50-pounder Dahlgren rifles. Pittsburgh, Act. V. Lieut. W. R. Hoel, 4 9-inch, 1 100-pounder Parrott, 2 30-pounder Parrotts. Mound City, Act. V. Lieut. A. R. Langthorne, 1 100-pounder Parrott, 4 9-inch, 3 8-inch, 150-pouParrott, 4 9-inch, 3 8-inch, 150-pounder rifle, 1 30-pounder rifle, 2 32-pounders. Osage, Lieut.-Com. T. O. Selfridge, 2 11-inch, 1 12-pounder howitzer. Neosho, Act. V. Lieut. Samuel Howard, 2 11-inch, 2 12-pounder howitzers. Tin-Clads. Cricket, Acting Master H. H. Gorringe, 2
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Mobile. (search)
rcival Drayton, 2 100-pounder Parrott rifles, 1 30-pounder Parrott, 18 9-inch, 3 howitzers; Brooklyn, Capt. James Alden, 2 10 howitzers; Lackawanna, Capt. J. B. Marchand, 1150-pounder Parrott pivot, 1 50-pounder Dahlgren pivot, 2 11-inch, 4 9-inch, 6owitzers; Monongahela, Com. James H. Strong, 1 150-pounder Parrott, 2 11-inch, 5 32-pounders, 3 howitzers; Ossipee, Com. William E. Le Roy, 1 100-pounder Parrott, 1 11-inch, 6 32-pounders, 2 30-pounder Parrotts, 2 howitzers; Oneida, Com. J. R. M. Mulnole, Com. Edward Donaldson, 1 11-inch pivot, 1 30-pounder Parrott, 6 32-pounders, Screw-steamer. Galena, Lieut.-Com. Clark H. Wells, 1 100-pounder Parrott pivot, 1 30-pounder, 8 9-inch, 1 howitzer. Double-Enders. Octorara, Lieut.-Com. Charles H. Greene, 1 100-pounder Parrott pivot, 3 9-inch, 2 32-pounders, 4 howitzers; Metacomet, Lieut.-Com. James E. Jouett, 2itzers; Port Royal, Lieut.-Com. B. Gherardi, 1 100-pounder Parrott pivot, 1 10-inch, 2 9-inch, 2 50-pounder Dahlgren rifles,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 13.93 (search)
and shell as they struck the boat sounded no louder than pebbles thrown against an empty barrel. At Boyle's Mill, lower down, there was another fort upon which was mounted a very heavy gun. This was also safely passed, and we then discovered two steamers coming up the river. They proved to be the Miami and the Southfield. The Miami carried six 9-inch guns, one 100-pounder Parrott rifle, and one 24-pounder smooth-bore howitzer, and the ferry-boat Southfield five 9-inch, one 100-pounder Parrott, and one 12-pounder howitzer.--editors. The two ships were lashed together with long spars, and with chains festooned between them. The plan of Captain Flusser, who commanded, was to run his vessels so as to get the Albemarle between the two, which would have placed the ram at a great disadvantage, if not altogether at his mercy; but Captain Cooke ran the ram close to the southern shore, and then suddenly turning toward the middle of the stream, and going with the current, the throttle
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the campaign of the Carolinas. (search)
k R. Wever, Col. John E. Tourtellotte: 56th Ill., Lieut.-Col. John P. Hall; 10th Iowa, Capt. William H. Silsby; 17th Iowa (1 co.), Capt. William Horner; 26th Mo. (2 co's and detachment, 10th Mo.), Lieut. Theron M. Rice; 80th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Pren. Metham, Maj. Thomas C. Morris. Fourth division, Brig.-Gen. John M. Corse. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Elliott W. Rice: 52d Ill., Lieut.-Col. Jerome D. Davis; 66th Ind., Lieut.-Col. Roger Martin; 2d Iowa, Col. Noel B. Howard; 7th Iowa, Lieut.-Col. James C. Parrott. Second Brigade, Col. Robert N. Adams: 12th Ill., Lieut.-Col. Henry Van Sellar; 66th Ill., Capt. William S. Boyd, Lieut.-Col. Andrew K. Campbell; 81st Ohio, Maj. William C. Henry. Third Brigade, Col. Frederick J. Hurlbut: 7th Ill., Lieut.-Col. Hector Perrin; 50th Ill., Lieut.-Col. William Hanna; 57th Ill., Maj. Frederick A. Battey; 39th Iowa, Capt. Isaac D. Marsh, Lieut.-Col. Joseph M. Griffith. Unassigned: 110th U. S. C. T., Maj. William C. Hawley, Capt. Thomas Kennedy, Capt. Zac
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Closing operations in the James River. (search)
mage were two 15-inch. One struck just above and to the right of the after-port on the port side, driving in the shield from the top of the port to the spar deck. The shield had six inches of iron and twenty-eight inches of old field pine. This shot killed one and wounded seven. Another struck amidships on the port side, driving in some two feet of the plating and the woodwork. The Richmond sustained little or no damage. The greatest damage this vessel sustained was from a 200-pounder Parrott that struck on the fantail forward and cut our anchor chain, and the jar, it is supposed, started her leaking. We got under way Tuesday evening, but found the Virginia's exhaust-pipe and smoke stack were so riddled as to fill the gun-deck with smoke and steam, which was the cause of our returning. The whole blame rests with the two pilots of the Virginia. editors. About the middle of February Commodore Mitchell was replaced in the command of the James River squadron by Admiral Semmes,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 18.114 (search)
arge was 1550 officers and men. The portion of the line assaulted was manned by Armstrong's brigade, regarded as the best in Forrest's corps, and reported by him at more than 1500 men. The loss from Long's division was 40 killed, 260 wounded, and seven missing. General Long was wounded in the head, Colonels [A. O.] Miller and [C. C.] McCormick in the leg, and [Lieutenant] Colonel [Jonathan] Briggs in the breast. . . . The immediate fruits of our victory were 31 field-guns and one 30-pounder Parrott, which had been used against us; 2700 prisoners, including 150 officers; a number of colors, and immense quantities of stores of every kind. Generals Forrest, Armstrong, Roddey, and Adams escaped, with a number of men, under cover of darkness, either by the Burnsville and River roads, or by swimming the Alabama River. A portion of Upton's division pursued on the Burnsville road until long after midnight, capturing four guns and many prisoners. I estimate the entire garrison, including th
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