Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Parrott or search for Parrott in all documents.

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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—Richmond. (search)
e easily repulsed by Warren's brigade. At the same time they engaged in an artillery fight with Porter's batteries posted on the summit of the hill, and for a moment threw the march of the Federal train into confusion. A few gun-boats, under Commodore Rodgers, were waiting for the army at Haxall's Landing; one of them, the Galena, had just taken General McClellan on board, who desired to make a reconnaissance up the river, when Wise's attack commenced. Rodgers immediately threw a few of Parrott's hundred-pound shells in the direction in which the enemy's reserves were supposed to be. These missiles, fired at random, could not do much harm to troops scattered about the forest; but the strange noise which announced their approach, and the crashing of trees which they shattered on their passage, and finally the violence of their explosion, produced a deep impression upon the Confederates. The Federals, on the contrary, who heard from a distance the heavy and powerful voice of the na
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—the naval war. (search)
r); the tenth, called the McClellan battery, at one thousand six hundred and fifty yards, two James eighty-four pounders (old forty-two) and two sixty-four pounders (old thirty-two); the eleventh, at one thousand six hundred and fifty yards, four ten-inch siege mortars. The siege artillery, therefore, comprised nine thirteen-inch mortars, seven ten-inch ditto, six ten-inch columbiads, four eight-inch ditto, two of James' fortytwo pounders, two thirty-two and one twenty-four ditto, and five Parrott's thirty pounders, making in all twenty-six smoothbore and ten rifled guns; among these ten, only the first four named were really of a powerful calibre. The last three batteries, placed side by side, were connected by a trench, each having magazines and splinter-proof shelters. At daybreak, on the 10th of April, a small boat bearing a flag of truce was seen to leave the coast near the lighthouse, to proceed toward the fort, and to go back immediately. It had scarcely returned when Hun