hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 84 2 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 48 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 44 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 41 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 33 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 26 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 9 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 8 2 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for E. G. Parrott or search for E. G. Parrott in all documents.

Your search returned 21 results in 13 document sections:

1 2
n thousand. It is now conclusively shown that not less than twenty-five thousand men were in position, and could have been brought into action. On the right and left their great superiority of numbers was plainly felt and seen, and the signal officers, from elevated positions, were enabled to count the regimental standards, indicating a strength equal to that I have stated. My own command consisted of two brigades of less than four thousand men, all told, with nine hundred cavalry, ten Parrott guns, and one battery of six-pounders, smooth-bore cannon. To this should be added the Tenth Maine regiment of infantry, and five companies of Maryland cavalry, stationed at Winchester, which were engaged in the action. The loss of the enemy was treble that of ours in killed and wounded. In prisoners ours greatly exceeds theirs. Officers, whose words I cannot doubt, have stated, as the result of their own observations, that our men were fired upon from private dwellings in passing thr
the Planter. Flag-officer Du Pont's report. flag-ship Wabash, Port Royal Harbor, S. C., May 14, 1862. sir: I enclose a copy of a report from Commander E. G. Parrott, brought here last night by the late rebel steam-tug Planter, in charge of an officer and crew from the Augusta. She was the armed despatch and transport man Robert and his associates. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, S. F. Du Pont, Plag-Offioer Commanding South-Atlantic Blockading Squadron. Commander Parrott's report. U. S. Steamer Augusta, off Charleston, May 13, 1862. sir: I have the honor to inform you that the rebel armed steamer Planter was brought oormation which he has brought off. I have the honor to request that you will send back, as soon as convenient, the officer and prize crew sent on board. I am, respectfully, your obedient servant, E. G. Parrott, Commander and Senior Officer present. Flag-Officer S. F. Du Pont, Commanding South-Atlantic Blockading Squadron.
ough to reach the battery. She then dropped a little below us, and made her shots effective. At five minutes after eleven o'clock the Galena had expended nearly all her ammunition, and I made signal to discontinue the action. We had but six Parrott charges, and not a single filled nine-inch shell. We had thirteen killed and eleven wounded. The rifled one hundred-pound Parrott of the Naugatuck burst, half of the part abaft the trunnions going overboard. She is therefore disabled. LiParrott of the Naugatuck burst, half of the part abaft the trunnions going overboard. She is therefore disabled. Lieut. Newman, the Executive Officer, was conspicuous for his gallant and effective services. Mr. Washburne, Acting Master, behaved admirably. These two are selected from among the number. The Aroostook, Port Royal, and Naugatuck took the stations previously assigned them, and did every thing that was possible. The Monitor could not have done better. The barrier is such that vessels of the enemy, if they have any, cannot possibly pass out; ours cannot pass in. I have the honor to be,
n of their work. The labors of the Army of the Mississippi, for the last ten days, have been herculean. You would not believe that as many men could make such splendid intrenchments, make as many bridges, and build as much corduroy road — fighting over every foot of the ground — as our little army has done. We have not taken a camp, or built a bridge, or occupied a field or wood, for ten days, without fighting for it. Gradually intrenching each day nearer and nearer, until we planted our Parrott shells in the rebel camps two miles in the rear of Corinth. But in this letter I wish to give you a history of the doings of Col. Elliott's cavalry, which Gen. Pope sent, two days before the evacuation of Corinth, to cut the Mobile Railroad, and cut off communication southward. His mission was eminently successful, and he returned to us last night without losing a single man. It will almost read like a fable, but the history I give you is true, as taken from his report, and the officers w
But a single line of general fortifications had been constructed, and these were actually less formidable than those thrown up by our forces last night, after occupying a new position. There were, besides this general line, occasional rifle-pits, both outside and inside the works, but they could have been constructed by three relief details in six hours. The only fortifications really worthy the name, were a few points where batteries were located, but these could not have resisted our Parrott and siege-guns half an hour. Yet the positions occupied by the breastworks were capable of being strengthened so as to render them almost invulnerable to a front attack, and no little difficulty would have been experienced in flanking the position, either on the right or left. The works were on the brow of a ridge, considerably higher than any in the surrounding country, and at the foot of it was a ravine, correspondingly deep. The zigzag course of the line gave the defenders the comma
llowing transcript from my memorandum — book. Passing along the line of water-batteries, about half a mile in extent, beginning at the upper end, I made the annexed entry: 1 128-pounder, rifled, casemated. 1 heavy 10-inch gun. 1 8-inch Parrott. 1 24-pounder, dismounted. 1 32-pounder, burst. 1 24-pounder, burst. 1 32-pounder, burst. 1 64-pounder, (Dahlgren,) burst. 1 32-pounder, dismounted. 1 heavy 8-inch columbiad, burst. 1 heavy 10-inch columbiad, burst. 1 13-inch mortar, burst. 1 128-pounder, dismounted. On the bluff but eight guns and two mortars had been mounted, of which six only remained, as follows: 2 32-pounders, dismounted. 1 64-pounder, (rifled,) burst. 1 10-inch Parrott, dismounted. 2 10-inch mortars, spiked. All these guns, except the mortars, had been heavily loaded, and fires were built around them, which burned their carriages and caused them to explode or dismount themselves when discharged. The two ten-inch
June 19, 1862. sir: The Conestoga, Lieut. Commanding G. W. Blodgett, arrived here to-day from White River. She brings information of the capture of two batteries at St. Charles, eighty miles from the mouth; the first of which mounted four Parrott guns, and the second three forty-two-pounder rifled guns. Three guns, it is understood, were taken from the gunboat Mariposa, which, after being dismounted, was sunk. There is now but one gunboat remaining in White River, the Pontchartrainot under way, the Mound City leading the St. Louis, Lexington and Conestoga, and the transports White Cloud and New National, with some six hundred men under Col. Fitch. At eight o'clock we called to quarters and commenced firing our No. One Parrott gun, and, the transports disembarked their troops, who marched out to attack the enemy in the rear. At nine came in sight of three boats sunk in the channel of the river, one of them a gunboat, and at five minutes past nine the flag-ship signal
e were numerous and of very superior workmanship. The twenty-six pieces were most beautiful, while immense piles of guns could be seen on every hand, many scarcely having the manufacturer's finish even tarnished. The enemy seemed quite willing to throw them away on the slightest pretext, dozens being found with loads still undischarged. The number of small arms captured was not less than fifteen thousand, of every calibre and every make. The field-pieces taken were principally Napoleon, Parrott and Blakely (English) guns. We have captured large quantities of army-wagons, tents, equipments, shoes. Clothing in abundance was scattered about, and immense piles of new uniforms were found untouched. Every conceivable article of clothing was found in these divisional camps, and came quite apropos to our needy soldiery, scores of whom took a cool bath, and changed old for new under-clothing, many articles being of costly material and quite unique. The amount of ammunition found was co
ns should be one third, and of smooth-bores, two thirds. That the rifle-guns should be restricted to the systems of the United States Ordnance Department; and of Parrott and the smooth-bores, (with the exception of á few howitzers for special service,) to be exclusively the twelve-pound gun of the model of 1857, variously called tParrotts; six smooth-bores, brass. Also the following guns, which were spiked and useless, on Maryland Heights: two nine-inch Dahlgrens; one fifty-pounder rifled Parrott; six twelve-pounder howitzers; four common rough; total, forty-seven. By publishing the above written items you will do justice to the public, and by stating tSix James's. Six 24-pound howitzers. Four 20-pound Parrott guns. Six 12-pound guns. Four 12-pound howitzers. Two 10-inch Dahlgrens. One 50-pound Parrott. Six 6-pound guns, and several pieces of Fremont's guns, of but little value. Seven of the whole number were thoroughly spiked. But few horses were taken, th
general propositions offered by me to Major-General McClellan, and which received his full approval: First. That the proportion of artillery should be in the ratio of at least two and a half pieces to one thousand men; to be expanded, if possible, to three pieces to one thousand men. Second. That the proportion of rifle-guns should be one third, and of smooth-bores, two thirds. That the rifle-guns should be restricted to the systems of the United States Ordnance Department; and of Parrott and the smooth-bores, (with the exception of á few howitzers for special service,) to be exclusively the twelve-pound gun of the model of 1857, variously called the gun-howitzer, the light twelve-pounder, or the Napoleon. Third. That each field-battery should, if practicable, be composed of six guns, and none to be less than four guns, and in all cases the guns of each battery should be of uniform calibre. Fourth. That the field-batteries were to be assigned to divisions, and not to
1 2