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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 4 0 Browse Search
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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), chapter 1.9 (search)
of the country, and conducted what was in many ways the best general literary magazine. The Knickerbocker Gallery, an elaborate gift book published for the benefit of the editor in 1855, and made up of brief poems and essays donated by contributors to the magazine, contained pieces by Washington Irving, William Cullen Bryant, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Oliver Wendell Holmes, James Russell Lowell, N. P. Willis, Fitz-Greene Halleck, Donald Grant Mitchell, George H. Boker, Bayard Taylor, T. W. Parsons, Epes Sargent, J. G. Saxe, James T. Fields, Charles Godfrey Leland, George William Curtis, Park Benjamin, Rufus W. Griswold, Richard Henry Stoddard, C. F. Briggs, and many more; and among other contributors of the early time were Miss Sedgwick, James Gates Percival, Richard Henry Wilde, Mrs. Sigourney, William Gilmore Simms, J. G. Whittier, Horace Greeley, and James Fenimore Cooper. The importance of The Knickerbocker magazine may be judged by this list of names; yet in dignity of tone
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 2: poets of the Civil War I (search)
charger on the battle-field. Thereafter the passion of events is recorded in the poems of the war, North and South. Bayard Taylor's Through Baltimore cried out against the opposition offered by Southern sympathizers to the passage through Baltimore streets of the Sixth Massachusetts. A. J. H. Duganne, in his impetuous Bethel, sang of the heroism but not the blunders of that battle, the chief victim of which, Theodore Winthrop, See also Book III, Chap. XI. was the subject of Thomas William Parsons's lofty Dirge for one who fell in battle. Bull Run, theme of many exultant Southern ballads and satires, See also Book III, Chap. III. brought from Boker the impassioned Upon the Hill before Centreville. In the controversy with England which followed the seizure of Mason and Slidell, Lowell wrote his spirited and determined Jonathan to John, second in the new series of Biglow papers. During September, 1861, Mrs. Ethelinda, (Ethel Lynn) Beers wrote The Picket-Guard (attributed i
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
an, the crowd, 259 n. Outre-Mer: a Pilgrimage beyond the Sea, 34 Overland monthly, 378, 381, 386 Over the Teacups, 228, 234 Ovid, 3 Packet (N. Y.), 178 Page, Thomas Nelson, 349, 351, 353, 358, 365, 379, 380, 388, 389, 390 Paley, 196 Palfrey, John Gorham, 109, 110, 197 Palmer, Dr. J. W., 298, 304, 307 Pan in wall Street, 242 Paper, 241 Pare, Ambroise, 229 Paris, Paulin, 209 Park, Edwards A., 208 Parker, Rev., Theodore, 111, 166 Parkman, Francis, 11 Parsons, T. W., 167, 280 Parley's magazine, 400 Partingtonian Patchwork, 155 Parton, James, 404 Pater, Walter, 103 Paulding, James K., 150, 162, 167, 241 Paul revere's Ride, 39 Payne, William Morton, 63 n. Paying too dear for one's Whistle, 215 Peabody, Elizabeth, 20 Peabody, Sophia, 20 Peabody, Institute, 338 Peacock, Gibson, 337, 342 Pearl, the, 369 Peaslee, Mary, 42 Pencillings by the way, 187 Pennsylvania Gazette, the, 178 Pennsylvania journal, the, 178 Pe
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
id that one could not throw a stone in Boston without hitting a poet; in the latter half of the century one's chances would have been little better. Representative, perhaps, of the countless lesser poets of New England in this period are Thomas William Parsons (1819– 92), a Boston dentist who translated the Inferno admirably in terza rima and wrote poems of small merit save On a Bust of Dante, which, through its Dantesque elevation and purity of form, deserves to rank with the best American lyrr poems, is only intermittently buoyant and martial, is too long, and is scarcely American in its sentiment Great is war-great and fair! In a rarer mood of Hovey's is Unmanifest destiny, in which, as in Seaward, his elegy on the death of Thomas William Parsons, his tone is impressively reverent and his music richly solemn. Another Columbia University poet of latter-day New York was the accomplished Frank Dempster Sherman (1860-1916), professor of graphics, an ardent philatelist and collector
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
gyricus, 460, 465 Pan in Wall Street, 46, 47 Papias and his contemporaries, 207 Papst, F., 589 Paradise lost, 487 Paragraphs on Banks, 432 Parisian romance, a, 278 Park, John, 445 Parker, Lottie Blair, 290 Parker, Louis N., 296 Parker, Samuel, 136, 137 Parker, Theodore, 119, 228 Parkman, F., 89, 135, 171, 178, 180, 188, 189-91, 192, 196, 200, 472 Parks, Wm., 537 Parlement of Foules, 485 Parlor Match, a, 279 Parr, Samuel, 453, 454 Parry, Dr., 157 Parsons, Thomas William, 38, 52 Passe Rose, 86 Passionate Pilgrim, the, 103 Pastor, Tony, 272 Pastorius, F. D., 572-73 Past, the present, the future, the, 435 Pater, Walter, 107, 261, 377 Pathetic Symphony, the, 49 Path to Riches, the, 430 Pattee, F. L., 75 n. Patten, S. N., 442 Patterson, Medill, 294 Paul, 469 Paul Kauvar, 277 Paul Patoff, 88 Payne, J. H., 498 Peabody, Andrew Preston, 302, 472 Peabody, F. G., 423 Peabody, Josephine Preston, 290 Peabody, O. W. B., 48
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899, Chapter 15: a woman's peace crusade (search)
, but my memory enabled me to give the substance of what I had written without referring to the paper. My impression is that I spoke in this way on some five or six Sundays. Of all these discourses, I remember only the last one, of which the text was, I am persuaded that neither height nor depth, nor any other creature, etc. The attendance was very good throughout, and I cherished the hope that I had sown some seed which would bear fruit thereafter. I remember that our own poet, Thomas William Parsons, happening to be in London at this time, suggested to me a poem of Mrs. Stowe's as very suitable to be read at one of my Sunday services. It was the one beginning:— When winds are raging o'er the upper ocean, and I am glad to remember that I did read it as advised. My work in London brought me in contact with a number of prominent workers in various departments of public service My acquaintance with Miss Frances Power Cobbe was pleasantly renewed, and I remember attending an
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899, Index (search)
11; repeats lines from Passion Flowers, 228; goes to Cuba accompanied by the Howes, 231; continues to Vera Cruz and Europe, 233; his meetings, 244; his parting gift to Massachusetts, 263; his opinion of Emerson, 291; of Dr. Hedge, 298; sympathizes with Mrs. Howe's desire for expression, 305. Parker, Mrs., Theodore, 160, 162. Parnell, Charles S., escorts Mrs. Howe to the House of Commons, 412. Parnell, Mrs., Delia Stuart, gives Mrs. Howe a note of introduction to her son, 412. Parsons, Thomas W., his poem on the death of Mary Booth, 241; suggests a poem for Mrs. Howe's Sunday meetings in London, 332. Passion Flowers, Mrs. Howe's first volume of poems, 228, 229; reviewed in Dwight's Journal of Music by Mrs. E. D. Cheney, 436. Passy, Frederic, takes Mrs. Howe to the French Academy, 414; also to the crowning of a rosiere, 415; presents her with a volume of his essays, 416. Paul, Jean, works of, read, 59. Pegli, Samuel Ward dies at, 73. Peirce, Benjamin, a member of