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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 34 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 14 4 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 13 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 3 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 2 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. 8 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 8 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 7 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 7 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Parsons or search for Parsons in all documents.

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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—--the Mississippi. (search)
ion on the evening of the 30th. The army intended to be formed was composed of Price's division of infantry, comprising Parsons' and McRae's two brigades, one 1868 strong, and the other numbering 1227 men; of Fagan's brigade, with about eighteen huions, has lost some time in placing McRae's brigade on his left, which is to take the Federal redoubt in the rear whilst Parsons attacks it in front. At last, about five o'clock, these two brigades rush forward: the Union artillery cannot stop themeir fire upon the work which the enemy has captured. Holmes hastens to the spot and makes one supreme effort. He hurls Parsons' brigade against Fort Curtis, ordering McRae to rally his scattered troops as much as possible and to attack Fort Hindman, before which Fagan's brigade is still to be found. But this double movement is productive of disastrous results. Parsons' soldiers, in coming down the hill with more dash than order, are cut down by the guns of Fort Curtis and those of the gunb