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e woods retiring. It was about three hours and a half from the time I formed in line to move forward until I returned. My men behaved in the most gallant style, and I had much more trouble to make them retire when it was found useless to advance than to move forward. The pioneer corps, under the command of Capt. N. Willard, was formed across the road to stop flying stragglers. They took possession of our prisoners as they were brought out of the woods and turned them over to an aid of Gen. Patrick, and rejoined me at the same time with the Twenty-fourth and Twenty-eighth New-Jersey. We then reoccupied our rifle-pits for about an hour, when I was ordered to move to the left and occupy the position at right angles to our rifle-pits, pits, which General Sykes's division had formerly occupied. In moving to this position we were heavily shelled by the enemy and met with some loss. The rest of the day was occupied by us in constructing rifle-pits along his line. Skirmishers were pl
s Colony had thirty towns, and was divided into four counties,--Middlesex, Norfolk, Suffolk, and Essex. 1646: Selectmen were empowered to try causes in a town where the magistrate could not, or where he was a party. The first mention of Medford in the public records of the Province is the following:-- At a Court of Assistants at Charlestown, 28th Sept., 1630. It is ordered that there shall be collected and raised by distress out of the several plantations, for the maintenance of Mr. Patrick and Mr. Underhill, the sum of £ 50, viz.: out of Charlton, £ 7; Boston, £ 11; Dorchester, £ 7; Rockbury, £ 5; Watertown, £ 11; Meadford, £ 3 ; Salem, £ 3; Wessaguscus, £ 2 ; Nantascett, £ 1. It appears from the records that the inhabitants of Medford did not receive legal notice of their incorporation as a town till fifty years after the event. Wishing to be represented in the General Court, they petitioned for an act of incorporation, and were answered, that the town had been inc
Colonel Sharpe, deputy provost-marshal-general, who was organizing his scouts and secret-service men for the coming campaign. It is April, and although no one knows yet what the new General-in-chief purposes doing, he has announced his intention of making his headquarters with the Army of the Potomac. Many scouting parties have been sent southward beyond the Rapidan, where the Army of Northern Virginia lies entrenched. Sutlers and their employees have been ordered to leave the Army. General Patrick, the provost-marshal-general, has recalled all permits granted citizens to remain within the lines; leaves of absence and furloughs have been revoked; Army-lists have been called for. The secret-service men around Colonel Sharpe's quarters know that they will soon be off on their many dangerous missions, as the eyes and ears of the moving Army. Colonel Sharpe getting ready for the last grand move-1864 Colonel Sharpe getting ready for the last grand move-1864 York troops with i
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 8.70 (search)
y profession, and resided at various times in Virginia, in Illinois, and in Missouri. He held many honorable and responsible offices in each of these states. He died and was buried in Staunton, Va. His eldest son, the Hon. Archibald Stuart, of Patrick, the father of our general, was an officer in the war of 1812. He embraced the profession of law, and throughout his long and eventful life was actively engaged in the practice of his profession, and in political life. He represented first the and deserted by his men. Rightfully did he inherit that joyous temperament which made his father the delight of the social circle, and that magnetic power by which he could impress himself upon, and control other men. To Archibald Stuart, of Patrick, and his wife, Elizabeth Letcher Pannill, of Pittsylvania, was born a family of four sons and six daughters. Among these our general was the seventh child and youngest son. Of his brothers, William Alexander Stuart, of Russell county, Va., alon
tion concerning New Orleans, 194-95. Farrand, Commodore, 85, 591. Featherston, General, 131. Ferguson, General, 332. Fishing Creek, Battle of, 17-19. Crittenden's account, 16-17. Fitch, General G. N., 499, 500. Fitzgerald, David, 200. Patrick, 200. Five Forks, Battle of 556. Fizer, Colonel, 296. Flanders, Messrs, 407. Benjamin F., 248, 639. Flemming, James, 200. Flood, John, 201. Florida, reconstruction, 632-33. (ship), 237. Preparation, 217-18. Escape from Mobile harb79, 87, 93, 111, 117, 128, 131,269,270,271,273, 278, 281, 296, 302, 303, 310, 367, 370, 426, 427, 437. Description of skirmish at White House, Va., 128-29. Skirmish with Sheridan at Yellow Tavern, 427-28. Death, 428. Sullivan, Michael, 200. Patrick, 200. Thomas, 201. Sumner, General, 102, 105, 106, 137, 275, 286,294. Testimony on battle of Sharpsburg, Va., 286. Sumter (ship), 210, 237. Preparation for action, 206-07. Activities, 207-08. Supreme Court (U. S.) Case of John Merrym
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 11: second Manassas (search)
al of the enemy. King's division, not dreaming of the proximity of the enemy, was marching down the pike with only a small advanced guard and a few skirmishers in front. The brigades were in the following order: Hatch's, Gibbon's, Doubleday's, Patrick's. The action which now ensued was somewhat remarkable in several features. It was fought principally by the brigadiers on each side. McDowell, in command of the Federal corps, was absent, having gone to find Pope and have a personal confere lost a lieutenant-colonel and two majors. Its other casualties were probably about 100. Gibbon's brigade, out of 2300 men, lost about 750, and Doubleday's two regiments, about 800 strong, lost about 350. Hatch's brigade, from the front, and Patrick's from the rear, were not engaged, partly because of the length to which the marching column had been strung out upon the march, and partly, perhaps, because of the absence of Gen. King. But he came upon hearing of the action, and at 1 A. M. on
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 12: Boonsboro or South Mountain, and Harper's Ferry (search)
wton, Trimble, Early, Hays7 Hill, A. P.Branch, Archer, Gregg, Pender, Field, Thomas7 JacksonWinder, Jones, J. K., Taliaferro, Starke6 Hill, D. H.Ripley, Garland, Rodes, Anderson, G. B. Colquitt4 Total 2d Corps4 Divisions19 Brigades, 24 Batteries, 100 Guns24 ArtilleryPendletonPendleton's Reserve, 58 Guns12 CavalryStuartHampton, Lee F., Robertson, 14 Guns3 Aggregate2 Corps, 10 Divisions43 Brigades, 284 guns, 55,000 Men67 CORPSDIVISIONSBRIGADESBATTS. 1st CorpsKingPhelps, Doubleday, Patrick, Gibbon4 HookerRickettsDuryea, Christian, Hartsuff2 MeadeSeymour, Magilton, Gallagher4 2d CorpsRichardsonCaldwell, Meagher, Brooke2 SumnerSedgwickGorman, Howard, Dana2 FrenchKimball, Morris, Weber3 5th CorpsMorellBarnes, Griffin, Stockton3 PorterSykesBuchanan, Lovell, Warren3 HumphreysHumphreys, Tyler, Allabach2 6th CorpsSlocumTorbert, Bartlett, Newton4 FranklinSmith, W. F.Hancock, Brooks, Irwin3 CouchDevens, Howe, Cochrane4 9th CorpsWillcox, O. B.Christ, Welsh2 BurnsideSturgis
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, New Jersey Volunteers. (search)
1862. Attached to Abercrombie's Provisional Brigade, Casey's Division, Defenses of Washington, to December, 1862. Patrick's Command, Provost Guard, Army of the Potomac, to January, 1863. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, 1st Army Corps, Army of t 1862. Attached to Abercrombie's Provisional Brigade, Casey's Division, Defenses of Washington, to December, 1862. Patrick's Command, Provost Guard, Army of the Potomac, to January, 1863. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, 1st Army Corps, Army of t 1862. Attached to Abercrombie's Provisional Brigade, Casey's Division, Defenses of Washington, to December, 1862. Patrick's Command, Provost Guard, Army of the Potomac, to January, 1863. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, 1st Army Corps, Army of t 1862. Attached to Abercrombie's Provisional Brigade, Casey's Division, Defenses of Washington, to December, 1862. Patrick's Command, Provost Guard, Army of the Potomac, to January, 1863. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, 1st Army Corps, Army of t
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, New York Volunteers. (search)
sworth's Brigade, McDowell's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. Patrick's 2nd Brigade, King's 3rd Division, 1st Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to Ap1st Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to January, 1863. Provost Marshal, General Patrick's Command, Army of the Potomac, to May, 1863. Service. Camp at Kalor1st Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to January, 1863. Provost Marshal, General Patrick's Command, Army of the Potomac, to May, 1863. Service. Duty in the Division, 1st Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to January, 1863. Provost Marshal General Patrick's Command, Army of the Potomac, to June, 1863. Service. Dutysworth's Brigade, McDowell's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. Patrick's 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 1st Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to April, 18igade, 1st Division, 1st Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to January, 1863. Patrick's Command, Provost Guard, Army of the Potomac, to June, 1863. 1st Brigade,
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Pennsylvania Volunteers. (search)
Fitzhugh's Crossing April 29-30. Battle of Chancellorsville May 2-5. Mustered out May 29, 1863. Regiment lost during service 3 Officers and 23 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 30 Enlisted men ,by disease. Total 56. 137th Pennsylvania Regiment Infantry. Organized at Harrisburg August 25, 1862, and ordered to Washington, D. C. Attached to 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 6th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to December, 1862. Provisional Brigade, Aquia Creek, Va., Patrick's Command, Army of the Potomac, to January, 1863. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, 1st Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to May, 1863. Service. Maryland Campaign September, 1862. Sugar Loaf Mountain September 10-11. Crampton's Gap September 14. Antietam September 17. Duty in Maryland to November. In Defenses of Washington, D. C., till December, and at Aquia Creek, Va., till January, 1863. Burnside's 2nd Campaign, Mud March, January 20-24, 1863. Duty at Belle Plains ti
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