Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 13, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Patterson or search for Patterson in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

addle upon these ambitious gentry too much of the responsibility of their misfortunes in the field. That the war itself is their work is a sin which they can never stone for; but the war has been carried on generally under the direction and supervision of educated officers. It is not probable that even General Butler is ass enough to make any important movement without the aid and guidance of the accomplished officers of the regular army by whom he is accompanied, and we observe that General Patterson, in reply to the criticisms of the Northern press, appeals to the regular officers of his staff as the real directors of his military movements.--The grand movement from Washington, which was the grandest disaster of all, was entirely controlled and regulated by the highest regular officers of the United States service. Their combined skill and experience, having at command the whole military and financial resources of the United States Government, were embarked in that movement, and
g in keeping up the piece for representation, should withdraw his advertisements from the newspapers and his posters from the walls?" How Johnston Outwitted Patterson. The Washington Republican (Abolition) says: Gen. Johnston's movement to Manassas, which was commenced on Thursday, was known on Friday at Williamsport, but was not known to General Patterson, at Harper's Ferry, until Sunday morning. On Saturday evening, Gen. Patterson telegraphed to Gen. Scott for more troops, and that Gen. Johnston was still at Winchester. At ten o'clock on Saturday evening a life long friend of Gen. Scott called at his quarters, but was deterred by the expresGen. Patterson telegraphed to Gen. Scott for more troops, and that Gen. Johnston was still at Winchester. At ten o'clock on Saturday evening a life long friend of Gen. Scott called at his quarters, but was deterred by the expression of the General's face from opening the subject of his visit. Inquiring of one of the aids what the matter was, he received the answer, that the General had a telegram from Harper's Ferry which displeased him. A sermon Spoiled. The Rev. J. M. Willey, the fighting Chaplain of the 3d Connecticut Regiment, thinking the