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James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley, Chapter 1: the Scotch-Irish of New Hampshire. (search)
lug, ana he ought to haa split down his head. On another occasion, he is said to have opened on a wellknown text in this fashion: I can do all things; ay, can yo Paul? I'll bet ye a dollar oa that (placing a dollar on the desk). But stop! let's see what else Paul says: I can do all things through Christ, which strengtheneth mePaul says: I can do all things through Christ, which strengtheneth me; ay, sae can I, Paul. I draw my bet, and he returned the dollar to his pocket. They prayed a joke sometimes, those Scotch-Irish clergymen. One pastor, dining with a new settler, who had no table, and served up his dinner in a basket, implored Heaven to bless the man in his basket, and in his store; which Heaven did, for the mPaul. I draw my bet, and he returned the dollar to his pocket. They prayed a joke sometimes, those Scotch-Irish clergymen. One pastor, dining with a new settler, who had no table, and served up his dinner in a basket, implored Heaven to bless the man in his basket, and in his store; which Heaven did, for the man afterwards grew rich. What is the difference, asked a youth, between the Congregationalists and Presbyterians? The difference is, replied the pastor, with becoming gravity, that the Congregationalist goes home between the services and eats a regular dinner; but the Presbyterian puts off his till after meeting. And how piou