Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for G. R. Paul or search for G. R. Paul in all documents.

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by to-morrow night, or I may lose that sugar and coffee; and I am afraid to go down any of these roads for fear my own men will kill me. The fear of losing that sugar and coffee brought her again to an accommodating mood, and she replied: Why, Paul, can't you show the Captain through our farm that road down by the field? The General says: Of course, Paul, you can do it; and as the night is very cold I will give you ten dollars (in gold) to help you along. The gold, and the prospect of sugaPaul, you can do it; and as the night is very cold I will give you ten dollars (in gold) to help you along. The gold, and the prospect of sugar and coffee, was too much for any poor man's nerves, and he yielded, and getting on a horse, he took them seven miles to the big road. From this time forward he had a series of adventures and escapes, all very wonderful, until he got near another river in Tennessee, when he resolved to go up to a house and find the way. Hines went to the house, while the General stood in the road. Hearing a body of cavalry come dashing up behind him, he quietly slipped to one side of the road, and it passed
of brick and stone; 150 pumps, wells, and aqueducts; 55 storehouses, used for storage, salt, etc.; 165 houses and shanties; 60 sheds and stables; 6000 bushels of salt, in barrels; a large number of axes, shovels, and hoes; one carpenter-shop, with tools, etc.; one fishing-house; 600 bushels of corn; 350 cords of wood. Captured--Five large wagons; eighteen mules and sets of harness; 2500 pounds of bacon; two fine horses, saddles, and bridles; about 1000 head of cattle, and one prisoner, G. R. Paul, government agent. All the articles captured I gave to the refugees, as they were of no use to us. The estimate value of the above property to the rebels cannot be less than $3,000,000. That is the value put upon it by the most intelligent refugees. List of articles and property destroyed on Goose Creek by the boats' crew from the United States steamer Tahoma, February twenty-sixth and twenty-seventh, 1864: Two thousand bushels of salt in barrels and bins; three corn-cribs, contai