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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 3 1 Browse Search
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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Morale of General Lee's army. (search)
, and the influence which he exerted for the religious good of his officers and men can never be fully known in this world. These noble leaders had at the first the co-operation of such Christian soldiers as Generals D. H. Hill, T. R. Cobb, A. H. Colquitt, J. E. B. Stuart, W. N. Pendleton, John B. Gordon, C. A. Evans, John Pegram, and a large number of other general, field, staff, and subordinate officers; and, during the war, Generals Ewell, Longstreet, Hood, Pender, R. H. Anderson, Rodes, Paxton, Baylor, and a number of others made professions of religion. Of the first four companies from Georgia, which arrived in Virginia, three of the captains were earnest Christians, and fifty of one of the companies belonged to one church. I remember one single regiment which reported over four hundred church members, when it first came into service, and another regiment which contained five ministers of the Gospel — a chaplain, one captain, and three privates. I have not space to give the
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Confederate negro enlistments. (search)
eception, an old negro woman, in a coarse sunbonnet, with a cotton umbrella under her arm, rapped at the door, and asked: Is dis Mr. Johnston's room? Yes. Mr. Joe Johnston's room? Yes. I wants to see him, den ; and in marched the old lady, going up to the distinguished soldier, and laying her hand familiarly upon his epauleted shoulder. Johnston turned, a look of surprise and gladness overspread his face, he took both the bony, bird-claw hands warmly in his own, and exclaimed: Why, aunt Judy Paxton! The old negress scanned his features with tears in her eyes, and at last said, in a querulous treble, made touching with undisguised emotion: Mister Joe, you is gittin‘ old. Then, patting his hand, the old nurse turned half apologetically to the assemblage, and said: Dis here's my own boy. Many's de time I's toted you in dese yere arms; didn't I, honey? Such a scene would be strange elsewhere, but it was not so in the South. The artless sense of equality grew out of the strongest s