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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 14 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoranda of the operations of Brigadier-General W. H. F. Lee's command during General Stoneman's raid into Virginia. (search)
Memoranda of the operations of Brigadier-General W. H. F. Lee's command during General Stoneman's raid into Virginia. Wednesday, April 29th, 1863--Chambliss' Thirteenth Virginia cavalry, with one piece of artillery, was left at Kelly's; Payne, with one hundred men of Second North Carolina cavalry, had gone to Germana; I, with the Ninth, went to Willis Madden's with General Stuart; left him that night and went to Culpeper Courthouse with the Ninth Virginia cavalry; Chambliss joined me there that night. Thursday, 30th--Marched from Culpeper to Rapidan station, with Ninth and Thirteenth Virginia cavalry, and one piece of artillery; left one squadron in Culpeper, which fell back before the enemy and joined me at Rapidan; enemy appeared that evening. Friday, May 1st--Engaged all day with one or two brigades of cavalry; one charge made by Colonel Beale, with one squadron to draw them out; took 30 prisoners, but could not bring them off — was pressed very hard; had orders from Ge
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 5.38 (search)
us, while jubilant at the news, are seemingly kinder than usual. April 11th to 15th I was the only officer in our ward that succeeded in buying a morning's paper to-day (the 15th). The In quirer was brought me at a late hour, hurriedly and stealthily, by the nurse Curry. I was inexpressibly shocked at reading at the head of the first column, first page, the terrible words: assassination of President Lincoln, John Wilkes Booth the Murderer. attempted murder of Secretary Seward, John Howard Payne the supposed Assassin. Then followed in detail the account of the assassination. I called aloud to my hospital comrades, and as I read, they left their bunks and crowded around me, listening with awe to the tragic recital. One of them remarked that he would gladly divide his last crust of bread with the daring Booth, if he should meet him in his wanderings. I said I looked upon Lincoln as a tyrant and inveterate enemy of the South, and could shed no tears for him, but deprecated
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Music and musicians in the United States. (search)
, 1786 Oliver Holden, of Charlestown, composer of Coronation, publishes The American harmony, in 3 and 4 parts1792 Mrs. Oldmixon, Nee George, makes her debut in America in Inkle and YaricoDec. 5, 1798 Euterpean Musical Society, New York City1800 Massachusetts Musical Society, Boston.1807 Barber of Seville sung by French artists in New OrleansJuly 12, 1810 Handel and Haydn Society organized in Boston, April 20, 1815; incorporated.Feb. 9, 1816 Clari, the maid of Milan, libretto by John Howard Payne, containing the song Home, sweet home, first produced in New YorkNov. 12, 1823 New York Sacred Music Society, organized 1823, gives its first concertMarch 15, 1824 New York Choral Society gives its first concert at St. George's Church, Beekman StreetApril 20, 1824 Manuel Garcia, with his wife, his son Manuel, daughter Marietta (Malibran), appears in Italian opera in New York CityNov. 29, 1825 Musical conventions in America originate in New Hampshire, where the Central Musical Socie
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Payne, John Howard 1792-1852 (search)
Payne, John Howard 1792-1852 Dramatist; born in New York City, June 9, 1792; was very precocious, editing The Thespian mirror when only thirteen years of age. He became a poet, a dramatist, and an actor of renown. At the age of fifteen and sixteen he published twenty-five numbers of a periodical called The pastime, and in 1809ondon. While there he produced many dramas, chiefly adaptations from the French. In one of these occurs the song Home, sweet home, by which he is chiefly known. Payne John Howard Payne. became a correspondent of Coleridge and Lamb; and, in 1818, when he was twenty-six years of age, his tragedy of Brutus was successfully broughJohn Howard Payne. became a correspondent of Coleridge and Lamb; and, in 1818, when he was twenty-six years of age, his tragedy of Brutus was successfully brought out at Drury Lane. He returned to the United States in 1832. He was appointed consul at Tunis, and died in office there, April 10, 1852. His remains were brought to Washington late in March, 1883, and interred at Georgetown.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
8, 1883 Irish-American National Convention at Horticultural Hall, Philadelphia; nearly 1,600 delegates; Alexander Sullivan, of Chicago, president......April 26, 1883 New civil service rules published by the President......May 8, 1883 New York and Brooklyn Bridge opened......May 24, 1883 National exposition of railway appliances opened in Chicago......May 24, 1883 Panic on the New York and Brooklyn Bridge; twelve killed, twenty-nine injured......May 30, 1883 Remains of John Howard Payne, author of Home, sweet home, who died at Tunis, April 1, 1852, are brought, by aid of W. W. Corcoran, of Washington, and interred in Oak Hill cemetery, Washington......June 9, 1883 Verdict of not guilty in the star-route case......June 14, 1883 Celebration of the 333d anniversary of Santa Fe, N. M.......July 2, 1883 Charles H. Stratton (Tom Thumb), born 1838, dies at Middleboro, Mass.......July 15, 1883 General strike of telegraph operators; 1,200 quit work......July 19, 18
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), District of Columbia. (search)
871 Alexander R. Shepherd appointed governor......Sept. 13, 1873 Congress abolishes the territorial government, substituting a temporary board of three commissioners appointed by the President......June 20, 1874 Permanent government of District constituted by Congress, in a board of three commissioners with no local legislative body......June 11, 1878 President Garfield assassinated in the Baltimore and Potomac Railroad station at Washington......July 2, 1881 Remains of John Howard Payne, who died in Tunis, Africa, in 1852, interred in Oak Hill Cemetery, Washington......June 9, 1883 Capstone of the Washington Monument placed (monument 555 feet high)......Dec. 6, 1884 American College of the Roman Catholic Church opened at Washington......Nov. 13, 1889 The Ford Opera-house collapsed during business hours; twenty-one clerks killed and many wounded......June 9, 1893 President Cleveland opens the Pan-American medical congress in Washington......Sept. 5, 1893
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 2: a Keats manuscript (search)
as much difference between the final corrected shape and the page showing the gradual changes as between the graceful yacht lying in harbor, anchored, motionless, with sails furled, and the same yacht as a winged creature, gliding into port. Let us now see, by actual comparison, how one of Keats's yachts came in. There lies before me a photograph of the first two stanzas of Keats's Ode on Melancholy as they stood when first written. The manuscript page containing them was given to John Howard Payne by George Keats, the poet's brother, who lived for many years at Louisville, Kentucky, and died there; but it now belongs to Mr. R. S. Chilton, United States Consul at Goderich, Ontario, who has kindly given me a photograph of it. The verses are in Keats's well-known and delicate handwriting, and exhibit a series of erasures and substitutions which are now most interesting, inasmuch as the changes in each instance enrich greatly the value of the word-painting. To begin with, the ti
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 2: the early drama, 1756-1860 (search)
Revolutionary satirists. Tyler's contrast. William Dunlap. J. N. Barker. J. H. Payne. beginning of the creative period. Stone's Metamora. the Philadelphia groiod begins naturally with the work of James N. Barker of Philadelphia and John Howard Payne of New York. Barker's first play, Tears and Smiles, was produced in 1807feeling of America toward England in 1812. Marmion was played as late as 1848. Payne, unlike Barker, represents foreign influence. From 1806 when his Julia, or Thewas in his opera of Clari (1823) that the song Home sweet home was first sung. Payne's achievement can hardly be properly rated until it is ascertained how much of al interest. Among those dealing with ancient history the most significant are Payne's Brutus (1818), Bird's Gladiator (1831), David Paul Brown's Sertorius, the Romready been spoken of in connection with the treatment of certain comic themes. Payne developed a form of farce largely from foreign sources, and W. E. Burton, by th
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
art, 343 Paradise lost, 265, 274 Pardey, Henry 0., 230 Parker, Theodore, 333, 340, 344-345, 347 Parkinson, Richard, 190, 206 Parks, William, 117 Parmenius, Stephen, 3 Parnassus, 276 Parnell, Thomas, 177 Partisan, the, 314, 315 Partisan leader, 312 Past, the, 270 Pathfinder, the, 209, 303 Patriot's appeal, 167 Paul and Alexis, 231 Paul Jones, the, 183 Paulding, James Kirke, 208, 238-239, 240, 247, 262, 278, 307, 308, 310, 311, 319 Pauw, 188, 207 Payne, John Howard, 220, 224, 231 Peabody, Elizabeth, 333, 341 Peabody, Sophia, 333 Peasant of Auburn, 163 Peck, John M., 190 Pelayo, 317 Pencillings by the way, 241 Penhallow, Samuel, 25 Penn, Richard, 98 Penn, Thomas, 98 Penn, William, 5, 18 Pennsylvania chronicle, the, 19 Pennsylvania gazette, the, 95, 115, 16, 119, 215 n. Pennsylvania journal, the, 119, 217 Pennsylvania magazine, the, 123 Pennsylvania packet, the, 136 People's lawyer, the, 228 Percival, Jame
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
ith much of their fun. On the other hand The Star Spangled banner belonged to the public of Francis and Joseph Hopkinson and John Copley and Gilbert Stuart. The artistic work of that day was well-turned and graceful; poetry and music lent themselves to dashes of magniloquent heroism and tender sentiment. The courtly traditions of manly strength, feminine grace, the cheering influence of the social glass, and a traditionally aristocratic point of view, were all implicit in them. What John Howard Payne's patron called the desolating effects of democracy he would say were registered in the loss of these echoed gentilities. The same loss is apparent in the course of American hymnology; but there is no reason for considering it more than a cheap and temporary price for benefits received and in store. For various reasons no selection of American hymns can quite compare in certainty with the choice of patriotic songs. As expressions of religious feeling hymns belong to an unnational
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