hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for George H. Payne or search for George H. Payne in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.47 (search)
Company G of the 18th Virginia Cavalry. From the Richmond, Va., Times-dispatch, Sep. 15, 1907. Roll of a Company that did Valiant service in the dark days. The following is the roll of Company G, Eighteenth Virginia Cavalry: W. D. Ervin, captain. Captured at McConnellsburg, Pa. Now dead. W. C. S. Jordan, lieutenant. Captured at McConnellsburg, Pa. Now dead. George H. Payne, lieutenant. Dead. John T. Byrd, first lieutenant. Living; address, Williamsville, Va. J. N. Potts, lieutenant. Living; address, Huntington, W. Va. Drumright, Richard-Ord, sergeant. Know nothing of him now. Pullin, George W., sergeant. Dead. Hodge, Joseph, sergeant. Kansas City, Mo. Lange, John A., sergeant. Moore, Brice, sergeant. Killed in battle at McConnellsburg, Pa. Clark, Adam, corporal. Know nothing of him. Wallace, John S., corporal. Living at Highland county, Va. Wood, Frank M., sergeant. Dead. Armtrout, J. C., private. Know nothing of him now. Anth
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.48 (search)
tion was not formed by the people of the United States as a whole, acting individually and nationally, with respect to the nationel powers delegated. It will be remembered that Mr. Calhoun brought all the weight of his great character and fervid eloquence to maintain the affirmative of that proposition; and that Mr. Webster combatted such affirmative in that epoch-making speech of his in 1833—even more memorable and able than that delivered by him in his perhaps more famous debate with Mr. Payne. Indeed, it seems to have been assumed by Mr. Calhoun as an elemental and unassailable proposition, and conceded by Mr. Webster (strange as it may seem now, reviewing the question from his standpoint), that it would inevitably result from this that, whatever sovereign States may have bound together, they could put asunder. But did this conclusion necessarily follow? Viewing the question in the light of past history alone, it would seem that it did. Assigning to sovereign States the