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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3 (search)
attached. Fifth Alabama Battalion. Cavalry corps. on face of return appears to have consisted of Hampton's, Fitz. Lee's and W. H. F. Lee's divisions and Dearing's brigade. Major-General Wade Hampton, Commanding. Lee's division. reported as detached. Major-General Fitzhugh Lee. Wickham's brigade. Brigadier-General W. C. Wickham. First Virginia, Colonel R. W. Carter. Second Virginia, Colonel T. T. Munford, Third Virginia, Colonel T. H. Owen. Fourth Virginia, Colonel W. H. Payne. Lomax's brigade. Brigadier General L. L. Lomax. Fifth Virginia, Colonel H. Clay Pate. Sixth Virginia, Colonel Julian Harrison. Fifteenth Virginia, Colonel C. R. Collins. Butler's division. Major-General M. C. Butler. Dunovants brigade. Brigadier-General John Dunovant. Third South Carolina, [Colonel C. J. Colcock.] Fourth South Carolina, [Colonel B. H. Rutledge.] Fifth [Sixth] South Carolina, Colonel [H. K.] Aiken. Young's brigade. Brigadier-General P.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations from the 6th to the 11th of May, 1864—Report of General B. R. Johnson. (search)
with batteries under the supervision of Col. Harris. Hagood's brigade was posted on the left, covering the turnpike bridge, and extending well out on either side. A detachment from this brigade and a section of artillery occupied Brander's bridge on the extreme left. McKathen's Fifty-first North Carolina regiment covered the railroad bridge, and Tilman's brigade was posted on the right, covering Level Ford and adjacent grounds. Some eighteen pieces of artillery, consisting of Hankin's, Payne's, Owen's and Martin's batteries, were distributed along our lines mainly at the fords and bridges. From the Forty-fourth Tennessee regiment, Johnson's brigade, twenty-two men and three sergeants, under Lieutenant F. M. Kelso, were detached to man the heavy artillery in Fort Clifton, where Captain S. J. Martin commanded. At 9 o'clock A. M. on the 9th of May, a small boat appeared in the Appomattox below Fort Clifton, which was fired on and driven off. At about 11 A. M. five gun boats a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of cavalry operations. (search)
heir reserve they had, in a piece of woods, a strong cavalry barricade, from which they gave us a warm reception. Their position commanded the road, and our battery could not be brought into action. I dismounted the brigade and sent Lieutenant-Colonel Cary Breckinridge, of the Second Virginia, to turn their right, which he did handsomely by moving well to our left and front; but in this attack he was severely wounded. Our battery once up and in position, we drove them steadily. Colonel William H. Payne, commanding the Fourth Virginia, supported the battery with spirit, and the Third and First pressing steadily forward on my right, while Major Graves, of the Second, moved steadily ahead on their right and kept their right contracting. Twice they were reinforced, and made stubborn resistance, but each time the vim of our battery and dash of our men on their flank started them again, and until we were in sight of Berryville, kept them on the move steadily back. At their next stand
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Major-General Fitzhugh Lee of the operations of the cavalry corps A. N. V. (search)
u, I marched the next day (30th) towards Dinwiddie C. H., via Five Forks, to watch and counteract the operations threatened by the massing of the Federal cavalry at Dinwiddie C. H. under Sheridan. After passing Five Forks, a portion of the enemy's cavalry were encountered with success and driven back upon their large reserves near the Courthouse. Night put an end to further operations, and my division was encamped in the vicinity of Five Forks. My loss, though slight, included Brigadier-General W. H. Payne amongst the wounded; and the loss of the services of this bold, capable officer was severely felt in all subsequent movements. I was joined during the evening by the divisions of Major-Generals W. H. F. Lee and Rosser, and by order of the Commanding General took command of the cavalry corps. On the 31st of March, Pickett coming up with five small brigades of infantry, we attacked the very large force of the enemy's cavalry in our front at Five Forks, killed and wounded many,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 95 (search)
dar Creek. He found Wickham, with his own and Payne's brigades, posted on the south side of Gorny ten Gap. Torbert fell upon the other brigade, Payne's, drove it from Millford, compelled it to retgor. His men demonstrated heavily in front of Payne, whose men were at the bridge, and they moved ront as if they intended to assault my lines. Payne repulsed those in front of him, and our riflesere firing? He smiled and said: If Billy (Colonel Payne) can hold that bridge—and it looks like heat they had withdrawn, I withdrew, leaving Colonel Payne with his brigade. (At that time Payne waPayne was the Colonel of the Fourth Virginia cavalry of my brigade, detailed to command Lomax's old brigade. Later Payne was commissioned Brigadier-General, and for gallant services which had been well wone enemy had returned in force and had run over Payne's little command, and that he was being pressed. Fortunately for Payne, he was able to get back beyond the road that passed through the Massanut[1 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Retreat up the Luray Valley. (search)
dar Creek. He found Wickham, with his own and Payne's brigades, posted on the south side of Gorny ten Gap. Torbert fell upon the other brigade, Payne's, drove it from Millford, compelled it to retgor. His men demonstrated heavily in front of Payne, whose men were at the bridge, and they moved ront as if they intended to assault my lines. Payne repulsed those in front of him, and our riflesere firing? He smiled and said: If Billy (Colonel Payne) can hold that bridge—and it looks like heat they had withdrawn, I withdrew, leaving Colonel Payne with his brigade. (At that time Payne waPayne was the Colonel of the Fourth Virginia cavalry of my brigade, detailed to command Lomax's old brigade. Later Payne was commissioned Brigadier-General, and for gallant services which had been well wone enemy had returned in force and had run over Payne's little command, and that he was being pressed. Fortunately for Payne, he was able to get back beyond the road that passed through the Massanut[1 more...]