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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Baltimore riots. (search)
rd, Coney, James Myers, and a boy whose name was not ascertained-4. The fact that more of the troops were not killed is to be ascribed to the fact that the citizens had no arms except paving-stones. Many more of the citizens were wounded beside those whose names were returned, and, perhaps, some more were killed. The lower classes generally concealed their injuries. The death of Mr. Robert W. Davis was one of the most tragic incidents of the day. Mr. Davis was a member of the firm of Paynter, Davis & Co., dry goods dealers, on Baltimore street, and one of the most prominent citizens of Baltimore. Early on the morning of the riot he went out on the line of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, a short distance from the city, for the purpose of looking at some land which he thought of purchasing. He was standing near the railroad track with some friends, among whom was Mr. Thomas W. Hall, Jr., a prominent journalist and lawyer of this city, and who is now City Solicitor of Baltimor
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 17: events in and near the National Capital. (search)
e was seriously wounded in the leg. At a little past noon, the troops entered the cars for Washington. Three of their number had been killed outright, one mortally wounded, and eight were seriously and several were slightly hurt. On their arrival at Washington, eighteen of their wounded were sent to the Washington Infirmary. Nine citizens of Baltimore were killed, and many — how many is not known — were wounded. Among the killed was Robert T. Davis, an estimable citizen, of the firm of Paynter, Davis & Co., dry goods merchants, who was a spectator of the scene. The cars into which the soldiers were hurried were sent off for Washington as soon as possible. The mob followed for more than a mile, and impeded the progress of the train with stones, logs, and telegraph poles, which the accompanying police removed. The train was fired into on the way from the hills, but at too long range to do much damage. That evening the Massachusetts troops, wearied and hungry, arrived at the C
one of the officers or men in those two brave companies. They are each one of them as true as steel; and in this charge, with six to one against them, they exhibited a coolness and determination that those of more experience might proudly imitate. Yet I feel that I would do injustice not to speak of the tenacity with which Capt. Switzler adhered to the order of charge, and the promptness and the energy of Capt. Montgomery in carrying it out. I cannot omit naming Lieutenants Montgomery, Paynter, and Stocksdale. Not a nerve quivered in those brave men; nothing left undone that coolness and energy could do in carrying out orders, encouraging the men, and dealing death-blows to rebels. One incident I must be permitted to mention. Lieutenant Montgomery, after exhausting his revolver and doubling up his sabre in a hand-to-hand fight, so that it was rendered useless, not satisfied with the half-dozen he had already despatched, he charged on yet another, and with one blow of his fist
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
they met the British bark Barracouta, from San Francisco, and learned of the capture of President Davis and the end of the war, whereupon they struck all guns below, transformed their ship into the appearance of a merchantman, and sailed for Liverpool, where they anchored November 6th. Then was hoisted for the last time the flag of the Southern Confederacy, having been carried by the Shenandoah to almost every quarter of the globe. There the ship was surrendered by Captain Waddell to Captain Paynter, of the British ship Donegal, and after some correspondence between Captain Waddell and Earl Russell, the officers and men were permitted to go ashore. Lieutenant Grimball went to London, and after examination before the marine board obtained a certificate of qualification to command an English ship. He then went to Mexico as a colonist and settled on a ranch near Cordova. About the time of the collapse of Maximilian's empire he returned to Charleston, studied law and was admitted to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
A, Richmond Grays, Captain C. Gray Bossieux, Lieutenants Goode and Jeter; 32 men. Company B, Walker Light Guard, Captain Frank W. Cunningham, and Lieutenants Haverty, Russell, and Hinchman; 40 men. Company D, Old Dominion Guards, Captain Charles Gasser, and Lieutenants Crawford and Stringer; 55 men. Company C, Guard of the Commonwealth, Captain George B. Shackelford, and Lieutenants Halstead and Morris; 40 men. Company F, Captain George Wayne Anderson, and Lieutenants Mills and Paynter; 56 men. Zzztwo Regiments combine. The third section of the infantry was occupied by a special formation from the Second and Fourth regiments of this State and some of the visiting troops. Lieutenant-Colonel Pole was in command of this regiment, which was made up as follows: Company D, Monticello Guard, Captain J. S. Keller, and Lieutenants Wingfield and Conlon; 40 men. Company D, of the Fourth Regiment, Captain G. W. Hope. Company G, of the Second Regiment, commanded by L
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
f Baltimore. Nothing could exceed the courage and skill with which Marshal Kane met the emergency with the small force under his command. When the troops reached Camden Station 130 were missing. Robert W. Davis killed. The killing of Robert W. Davis, who was shot by the soldiers from the car windows, was an atrocious act, and tended more than any one incident to intensify the feeling of bitterness against the Northern troops. Mr. Davis was a member of the wholesale firm of Pegram, Paynter & Davis, of Baltimore street. He was an Irishman by birth and had married in Virginia. One of his brothers was an officer in the British Army. He was a gentleman of high character and great popularity. Upon the announcement of his death all the wholesale dry goods stores of the city closed in respect to his memory and in testimony of his worth. The Sun the next day in an editorial denounced the killing of Mr. Davis as a wanton and deliberate murder. The story of the event, as told at t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.29 (search)
f Baltimore. Nothing could exceed the courage and skill with which Marshal Kane met the emergency with the small force under his command. When the troops reached Camden Station 130 were missing. Robert W. Davis killed. The killing of Robert W. Davis, who was shot by the soldiers from the car windows, was an atrocious act, and tended more than any one incident to intensify the feeling of bitterness against the Northern troops. Mr. Davis was a member of the wholesale firm of Pegram, Paynter & Davis, of Baltimore street. He was an Irishman by birth and had married in Virginia. One of his brothers was an officer in the British Army. He was a gentleman of high character and great popularity. Upon the announcement of his death all the wholesale dry goods stores of the city closed in respect to his memory and in testimony of his worth. The Sun the next day in an editorial denounced the killing of Mr. Davis as a wanton and deliberate murder. The story of the event, as told at t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The cruise of the Shenandoah. (search)
derate flag at her peak, and was anchored by the pilot, by Captain Waddell's order, near H. B. M. guardship Donegal, Captain Paynter, R. N., commanding. Soon after a lieutenant from the Donegal came on board to learn the name of our vessel and advi C. S. S. Shenandoah, was surrendered to the British nation by letter to Earl Russell, from Captain Waddell, through Captain Paynter, royal navy, commanding H. M. S. Donegal. The gallant little ship had left London thirteen months before as the r Robert Phillimore. In consequence of these opinions of the law officers of the Crown, instructions were sent to Captain Paynter, of her majesty's ship Donegal, to release all officers and men who were not ascertained to be British subjects. CaCaptain Paynter reported on November 8 that, on receiving these instructions he went on the Shenandoah, and being satisfied that there were no British subjects among the crew, or at least none of whom it could be proved were British subjects, he permi
ple had mostly returned to the depot. Shots and stones were exchanged between the military and citizens at several points, with the result detailed elsewhere. The Shooting and Killing of Robert W. Davis, Esq.--inquest at the Southern Police station. The death of Robert W. Davis, Esq., at the hands of the Northern troops yesterday, has created an intense feeling in this community, especially among the merchants, of which class he was an honored member, in the firm of Messrs. Pegram, Paynter & Davis, Baltimore street. He had gone out to the railroad track with the multitude, and when shot was standing apart with some gentlemen on an elevation, between the distillery and Redley street, on the Spring Garden side. He received a Minnie musket ball in his left side, and reeling for a moment or two, fell, and died without uttering a word, though he breathed several times after policemen Pumphrey, Creamer, Butler and Hawkins reached him. A ball also penetrated the back of his coat.