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Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Chapter 3: the White Oak Road. (search)
f course, Warren could not recall Bartlett. But to comply as nearly as possible with the order, he at once directed General Pearson, who with three of Bartlett's regiments was guarding the trains on the Boydton Road, to move immediately down towards Dinwiddie. Pearson got to the crossing of the main stream of Gravelly Run, and finding that the bridge was gone, and the stream not fordable, halted for orders. But things were crowding thick and fast. Pearson's orders were countermanded, and oPearson's orders were countermanded, and orders came from army headquarters for Griffin's Division to go. On the news of Sheridan's discomfiture, Grant seems first to have thought of Warren's predicament. In a despatch to Meade early in the evening he says: I would much rather have Wars was a very different direction, and of different tactical effect. It being impossible to recall Bartlett, Warren sent Pearson, already on the Boydton Road, with a detachment of Bartlett's Brigade. 3. To send Griffin's Division by the Boydton
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Chapter 7: the return of the Army. (search)
, sincere and brave of speech, reverential and religious in cherished thought; Ayres, too, ours from the beginning, solid and sure as the iron guns he brought, holding all his powers well in hand, faced to the front; gallant, ever-ready, dashing Pearson; dear old Gregory, pure-souled as crystal, thinking never of self, calmest in death's carnival; others, younger,--how shall I name them all? Staff officers, cool, keen, and swift as sword flash, fulfilling vital trusts, even at vital cost;--of the misbehavior of some of these men. Now and then charges were brought against our own men. These cases must be disposed of. Otherwise our provost guard would be swamped with prisoners. So a division court-martial was duly organized, with General Pearson as president. This was in effect at least a tribunal of justice, and it inspired respect, as well as compelled obedience. The court, ably conducted, was very careful in its procedure and its decisions. It came to be looked upon as a legit
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Chapter 9: the last review. (search)
view. For me, while this division was passing, no other thing could lure my eyes away, whether looking on or through. These were my men, and those who followed were familiar and dear. They belonged to me, and I to them, by bonds birth cannot create nor death sever. More were passing here than the personages on the stand could see. But to me so seeing, what a review, how great, how far, how near! It was as the morning of the resurrection! The brigades to-day are commanded by General Pearson, General Gregory, and Colonel Edmunds, veterans of the corps. First is the Third Brigade, bearing the spirit and transformed substance of Porter's old division of Yorktown, and Morell's at Gaines' Mill and Malvern Hill. These are of the men I stood with at Antietam and Fredericksburg, and Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. Of that regiment — the 20th Maine--a third were left on the slopes of Round Top, and a third again in the Wilderness, at Spottsylvania, the North Anna, Cold Harbor,
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 37 (search)
XXXVI. march, 1864 Attempt to capture Richmond. Governor Vance and Judge Pearson preparations to blow up the Libby prisoners. letter from General Lee. proposal to execute Dahlgren's raiders. General Butler on the Eastern Shore. colonel Dahlgren's body. destitution of the army. strength of the Southwestern army.hours we can muster men enough to defend the city against 25,000. A letter from Gen. Whiting suggests that martial law be proclaimed in North Carolina, as a Judge Pearson--a traitor, he thinks — is discharging men who have in conscripts as substitutes, on the ground that the act of Congress is unconstitutional. The President sisoners, taken six miles above town-one lieutenant-colonel among them; and Yankee horses, etc. are coming in every hour. Gov. Vance writes that inasmuch as Judge Pearson still grants the writ of habeas corpus, and discharges all who have put substitutes in the army, on the ground of the unconstitutionality of the act of Congres
ly are necessary here: Captains Henry Curtis, Jr., F. G. Hentig, James A. Lee, Lieutenants Lowrie and Edmiston. They were with the General always except when upon duty. Of Colonel Chapin, commanding the Second brigade of Second division, Twenty-third army corps, I need not add to what I have said. His excellent management of the troops upon three fields, and his personal bravery, have attached him to his men as few commanders are attached. His staff, Captains Gallup and Sheldon and Lieutenant Pearson, are worthy followers of their brave leader. Colonel W. E. Hobson, of the Thirteenth Kentucky, upon whom the command of the brigade at times devolved, behaved always as became the hero of Huff's Ferry. Lieutenant-Colonel Lowry, of the One Hundred and Seventh Illinois; Major Sherwood, of the One Hundred and Eleventh Ohio; and Major Wheeler, of the Twentythird Michigan, each commanding, all carried themselves nobly. I must mention the name of ex-Colonel Joseph J. Kelly, of the One Hund
rging upon the enemy. His place will not be easily filled. Generals Slack and Clark of Missouri were severely wounded--Gen. Price slightly. Capt. Hinson of the Louisiana regiment, Capt. McAlexander of Churchill's regiment, Captains Bell and Brown of Pearce's brigade, Lieuts. Walton and Weaver--all fell while nobly and gallantly doing their duty. Col. McIntosh was slightly wounded by a grape-shot, while charging with the Louisiana regiment--Lieut.-Col. Neal, Major H. Ward, Captains King, Pearson, Gibbs, Ramsaur, Porter, Lieutenants Dawson, Chambers, Johnson, King, Adams, Hardista, McIvor, and Saddler, were wounded while at the head of their companies. Where all were doing their duty so gallantly, it is almost unfair to discriminate. I must, however, bring to your notice, the gallant conduct of the Missouri Generals — McBride, Parsons, Clark, Black, and their officers. To Gen. Price, I am under many obligations for assistance on the battle-field. He was at the head of his forc
rging upon the enemy. His place will not be easily filled. Generals Slack and Clark of Missouri were severely wounded--Gen. Price slightly. Capt. Hinson of the Louisiana regiment, Capt. McAlexander of Churchill's regiment, Captains Bell and Brown of Pearce's brigade, Lieuts. Walton and Weaver--all fell while nobly and gallantly doing their duty. Col. McIntosh was slightly wounded by a grape-shot, while charging with the Louisiana regiment--Lieut.-Col. Neal, Major H. Ward, Captains King, Pearson, Gibbs, Ramsaur, Porter, Lieutenants Dawson, Chambers, Johnson, King, Adams, Hardista, McIvor, and Saddler, were wounded while at the head of their companies. Where all were doing their duty so gallantly, it is almost unfair to discriminate. I must, however, bring to your notice, the gallant conduct of the Missouri Generals — McBride, Parsons, Clark, Black, and their officers. To Gen. Price, I am under many obligations for assistance on the battle-field. He was at the head of his forc
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 2: early recollections of California--(continued). 1849-1850. (search)
houses were being put up, but of the most flimsy kind, and all were stores, restaurants, or gambling-saloons. Any room twenty by sixty feet would rent for a thousand dollars a month. I had, as my pay, seventy dollars a month, and no one would even try to hire a servant under three hundred dollars. Had it not been for the fifteen hundred dollars I had made in the store at Coloma, I could not have lived through the winter. About the 1st of April arrived the steamer Oregon; but her captain (Pearson) knew what was the state of affairs on shore, and ran his steamer alongside the line-of-battle-ship Ohio at Saucelito, and obtained the privilege of leaving his crew on board as prisoners until he was ready to return to sea. Then, discharging his passengers and getting coal out of some of the ships which had arrived, he retook his crew out of limbo and carried the first regular mail back to Panama early in April. In regular order arrived the third steamer, the Panama; and, as the vessels w
ati Observatory in 1845. The Cambridge Observatory in 1847. The Amherst Observatory in 1847. Dartmouth, Newark, Shelbyville, Ky., Buffalo, Michigan University, Albany, and Hamilton College, have also observatories. A good article on the astronomical observatories of the United States may be found in Harper's Magazine, June, 1856. See also Observations at the Washington Observatory, volume for 1845. For more full details than in the articles named, see Chambers's Astronomy; Dr. Pearson's Practical Astronomy; Loomis's Practical Astronomy; Simm's Treatise on Instruments; Heather on Mathematical Instruments. As-tro-nom′i-cal Lan′tern. One with panes or slides having perforations whose relative size and position represent stars in a given field of the heavens. Astronomical telescope. As-tro-nom′i-cal Tel′e-scope. A telescope in which the image is inverted, composed of a converging object-glass A B, and of a converging eye-glass C D. Rays of light falling fr
photographic micrometer is thus described by Sir David: — If a system of opaque or transparent lines be impressed upon the collodion photographically when reduced to the minutest size, from a system of large and sharply defined lines, we shall have the most perfect micrometrical scale that can be conceived: the portion of collodion that contains no nitrate of silver being as transparent as if the dark places were solid wires or metallic plates placed in the focus of the eye-glass. See Pearson's Practical astronomy, Vol. II.: Brewster's Philosophical instruments. Cavallo's micrometer is a small, semi-transparent scale of mother-of-pearl, about 1/20 of an inch broad and divided by finely ruled lines. It is situated within the tube, at the focus of the eye-lens of the telescope, with its divided edge in convenient proximity to the image. See under the following heads: — Annular micrometer.Micrometer-balance. Circular micrometer.Micrometer-microscope. Cobweb micrometer.
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