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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Joseph Pease or search for Joseph Pease in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 3: the Clerical appeal.—1837. (search)
the formation of a State Anti-Slavery Society. His life was, even to observers at Lib. 7.128, 135. a distance, clearly in great peril. Still, his situation could not be fully realized by those who did not know the elements of the community in which he was endeavoring to maintain himself; and, his case excepted, there seemed a lull in violence over the whole field when Mr. Garrison wrote thus, on November 6, to Miss Elizabeth Pease, The daughter of a wealthy and philanthropic Quaker, Joseph Pease; a lady whom he had never met, and who had just introduced herself by a gift of five guineas sent through Angelina Grimke. An intimate and lifelong friendship ensued. of Darlington, England: With regard to the present state of the anti-slavery Ms. question in this country, you will be pleased to learn that the friends of the slave are daily multiplying in all parts of the non-slaveholding States; that there are now not less than twelve hundred anti-slavery societies in existence;
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 7: the World's Convention.—1840. (search)
shared the generous illusion as to the possible agency of British India in the abolition of American slavery, is manifested in the following remarkable letter, written just on the eve of his departure from England: W. L. Garrison to Joseph Pease. Liverpool, August 3, 1840. Ms. esteemed friend: At your request, I sit down to give you my opinion as to the prospect of the speedy and peaceable overthrow of slavery in the United States. Let me say, then— 1. That Christianity sanctn from her own vast and fertile possessions in the East. I am sure that your British India movement will fill the hearts of American slaveholders with dismay. Mr. Garrison was able to verify this prediction upon his return. He writes to Joseph Pease, at Darlington, on Sept. 1, 1840 (Ms.): Already, there is much consternation on this side of the Atlantic, among the planters and their Northern adherents, in relation to that [British-India] movement. My eye at this moment rests upon a copy
, 287, 289; B. Lundy, 1.196; Mass. A. S. S., 2.85; S. J. May, 1.221, 314, 428, 431, 450,: 56, 65, 85, 13, 209, 224, 236, 241, 261, 401; H. Minot, 1.331, 332, 338, 342; Patriot (London), 1.365, 378; E. Pease, 2.183, 331, 404, 411, 414, 416, 431; J. Pease, 2.391, 393; R. Purvis, 1.284, 311, 313, 314; G. Shepard, 1.204; T. Shipley, 2.64; L. Sunderland, 1.236; Sussex, 1.365, 366, 368; L. Tappan, 2.163; Times (London), 1.354, 366; F. Todd, 1.80; J. G. Whittier, 1.189; E. Wright, 2.269; H. C. Wrightpraise from Mrs. Chapman, 406, 412; forwards Clarkson's protest against colonization, 388, 416; sends Colver's letters to G., 429; on G.'s infidelity, 430.—Letters to G., 2.388; Collins, 2.430; from G., 2.183, 331, 404, 411, 414, 416, 431. Pease, Joseph, of Feethams, [b. Darlington, Eng., Jan. 28, 1772; d. there, Mar. 16, 1846], Quaker abolitionist, 2.183, member Brit. India Com., 372.—Letters from G., 2.391, 393. Peel, Robert [1788-1850], 1.354; opposes Emancipation Bill, 355; at Wilber