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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 24 0 Browse Search
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overpowered the pickets before they could give alarm, and surrounded the festive fools at Doolin's table. A number of men made their escape, but the following, together with the wagons and horses, were captured by the rebels: Captain W. L. Lanning, Second Lieutenant James W. Andrews; corporals, M. White, P. Cooney, and G. H. Vanderzer; privates, P. Frazier, George McWharton, L. Hardigen, Harris Stafford, John Sleight, D. G. B. Morris, A. Holtzer, N. W. Rowland, Coles Stanton, C. B. Elms, William Peck, A. W. Porter, Thomas Porter, Walter Merrick, Louis Marto, H. C. Smith, Robert Whelan, William McCormick, Stephen Stickles, Freeman Clapper, James Morrison, Daniel Connor, and Ned Riley. Doolin and Brush, who previous to this time were supposed to be good Union men, were arrested on the charge of having betrayed the troops--N. Y. Tribune, November 18. Gen. C. P. Buckingham, Adjutant-General of Ohio, issued a stirring appeal to the men of that State, calling upon them to swell the nu
f Georgia, issued an address to the planters of that State, calling upon them voluntarily to send to General Mercer one fifth of their negroes, in order to complete the for-tifications around Savannah. If they were not sent in, General Mercer was authorized to impress whatever number he required for that purpose.--(Doc. 22.) The rebel schooner Adventurer, laden with salt, leather, etc., was captured by the United States steamer Kensington, in the vicinity of Mermanteau Pass, La.--Major-General Peck, from his headquarters at Suffolk, Va., issued a general order denouncing pillage, and calling upon his forces to cooperate with him in bringing the guilty to a speedy trial.--The Richmond Whig of this date opposes the rebel conscription law as unpopular, if not odious, among a large class of the people. A National force composed of the First Mounted Riflemen, N. Y. S. V., Follett's battery, the Eleventh cavalry of Pennsylvania volunteers, and General Wessell's brigade, visited Fr
January 20. John A. Andrew, Governor of Massachusetts, was authorized by the National War Department, until further orders, to raise such numbers of volunteer companies of artillery for duty in the forts of Massachusetts and elsewhere, and such corps of infantry for the volunteer military service as he may find convenient, and may include persons of African descent, organized into separate corps. --War Department Order. The rebel steamer Oreto arrived off Havana, Cuba, and was allowed to enter and proceed up the harbor to an anchorage.--Major-General Peck, in orders from his headquarters at Suffolk, Va., expressed his satisfaction at the soldierly qualities exhibited by Colonel Alfred Gibbs, of the One Hundred and Thirtieth N. Y. S. V., and his confidence in his disposition and ability to discharge whatever duties might fall to him, with credit to himself and the National service.
ft suddenly this evening. General Foster, who arrived at Newbern yesterday, was preparing an expedition to march for the relief of the town, when the account of the departure of the rebels reached him.--See Supplement. At a point seventy miles south of Salt Lake City, Utah, Colonel Evans, with a party of National troops, attacked and put to flight two hundreds Indians, thirty of whom were killed. The Union forces followed them fourteen miles, scattering them in every direction. Lieutenant Peck was killed and two sergeants were wounded on the National side.--A battalion of cavalry from California arrived at New York from San Francisco, under the command of Major De Witt C. Thompson.--Fighting was continued on the Nansemond River, Va., and its vicinity. A detachment of two hundred of the Thirty-ninth Kentucky mounted infantry, under the command of Colonel J. Dills, made a forced march on Pikeville, Ky., and after a sharp fight, captured seventeen rebel officers and sixty-o
forcements, and the Nationals fell back to Hernando. Being reenforced there by infantry and artillery, under Colonel Bryant, the Unionists again moved on the Coldwater, and attacked the rebels on the opposite side of the river, continuing the contest until sundown, and losing five killed and fifteen wounded. Major-General Dix, in a despatch to the War Department, said: I deem it due to the forces at Suffolk to notice briefly their gallant conduct during the last six days. On Tuesday General Peck's right was attacked, and the enemy's advance was gallantly met by Colonel Foster's light troops, driving him back to the line of his pickets. Anderson's division was engaged at the same time on the water-front with our gunboats and batteries, and suffered materially. On Wednesday a rebel battery of twenty-pounder rifled guns was effectually silenced, and an attack on the Smith Briggs, an armed quartermaster's boat, was repulsed. Repeated attempts have been made on our lines, but have
elligence, and the betrayal of the movements of the army of the Potomac by publication of injudicious correspondence of an anonymous character, made it necessary for General Hooker to issue general orders requiring all newspaper correspondents to publish their communications over their own signatures.--General Orders No. 48. A rebel battery on the Nansemond River, Va., was silenced, after a spirited contest, by the guns from the Union battery Morris and the gunboat Commodore Barney.--General Peck's Order No. 29. William F. Corbin and T. G. Graw, found guilty of recruiting for the rebel service, inside the National lines, were this day sentenced to be shot, by a court-martial in session at Cincinnati, Ohio. A detachment of the Sixth New York cavalry, under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel McVicar, while reconnoitring in the vicinity of Spottsylvania Court-House, Va., to-day were surrounded by four regiments of General Fitz-Hugh Lee's rebel cavalry and fifty-two of their
e command of Colonel Davis, and a body of rebel troops, resulting in a rout of the latter with great slaughter. After the fight, Colonel Davis advanced on Camp Moore, which he burned, together with the railroad depot and bridge, and a great quantity of property.--New Orleans Era. William Corbin and T. P. Graw, found guilty of enlisting for the rebel service within the National lines, were executed at Johnson's Island, near Sandusky, Ohio.--The rebel schooner Royal Yacht, was captured by the bark W. G. Anderson.--The rebels captured two small steamboats in the Dismal Swamp Canal, N. C.--The ship Crown Point, in latitude 7° south, longitude 34° west, was captured and burned by the rebel privateer Florida. Several desperate infantry fights took place to-day in the vicinity of Carrsville and Suffolk, Va., between the National forces under the command of General Peck, and large bodies of reel troops, in which both parties suffered severely, without gaining any material advantag
June 5. Contrabands in the vicinity of Suffolk, Va., having signified their intention of serving the United States as armed soldiers, orders were issued by Major-General Peck to Captain John Wilder, to recruit a company of colored troops, subject to no molestation in removing those so recruited to the place of rendezvous, at Craney Island. --A squadron of the Sixth New York Cavalry, commanded by Major William P. Hall, on an expedition from Yorktown, Va., to Warwick River, succeeded in destroying twenty-three boats and one schooner belonging to the rebels.--Brigadier-General Alexander P. Stewart, of the rebel army, having been promoted to the rank of Major-General, took leave of his brigade, and assumed command in the corps of General Hardee, at Wartrace, Tenn.--Chattanooga Rebel, June 7. The steamer Isaac Smith, which was captured by the rebels on the first of February last, was sunk while trying to run the blockade of Charleston, S. C., by the national gunboat Wissahickon.
from Kelly's Ford that it was definitely known the position at Rappahannock Station was evacuated. The army was put in motion, and the pursuit continued by the infantry to Brandy Station, and by the cavalry beyond. Major-General Sedgwick reports officially the capture of six guns, eight battle-flags, and over one thousand five hundred prisoners. Major-General French took over four hundred prisoners. General Sedgwick's loss was about three hundred killed and wounded. French's about seventy. The conduct of both officers and men in each affair was most admirable. --(Doc. 10.) A cavalry fight took place at a point two miles south of Hazel River, on the road leading from Culpeper to Jefferson, Virginia, between the Nationals under the command of General Buford, and Wilson's division of Hill's rebel corps.--(Doc. 10.) A reconnoissance of the Chowan River, North-Carolina, to the vicinity of the mouth of the Blackwater, under the direction of Major-General Peck, was finished.
d of Captain George W. Graham, First North-Carolina volunteers, (Captain R. R. West, Twelfth New York cavalry, having generously waived his rank, in deference to Captain Graham's familiarity with the country to be traversed,) attacked a camp of rebels near Greenville, North-Carolina, and after a brief and gallant contest, more than fifty prisoners, a hundred stand of arms, and a considerable amount of subsistence and quartermaster's stores fell into the hands of the Nationals, while but one of their men was fatally wounded. It was an affair in which the sterner virtues of the soldier, patience and fortitude, were equally exhibited with gallantry and daring, but twenty-four hours having been occupied in all, and a march of nearly seventy miles having been performed.--General Peck's Order. The battle of Chattanooga, Tennessee, closed this day. Missionary Ridge was carried completely by the National troops, and the rebels routed, so that they fled in the night.--(Docs. 14 and 18.)
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