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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—Richmond. (search)
which followed the Yorktown turnpike emerges into the clearing where Smith's troops are drawn up. Peck's brigade, which is the first to make its appearance, enters the wood and vigorously attacks the ven pieces fell into the hands of the assailants. It was three o'clock. Precisely at this moment Peck's brigade of Couch's division was arriving from Seven Pines, led by Keyes, who had been informed earny, composing Heintzelman's corps; at the extreme left, Keyes, with the divisions of Couch and Peck, guarding the passes of White Oak Swamp. On the other side, the conquerors of Gaines' Mill hadhe approaches to Haxall's, where a large number of roads converged, were entrusted to Keyes, with Peck's division, who thus found himself facing eastward, with his back turned toward that of Sykes. Tthe brigade of regulars, only reached this point on the morning of the 2d. At Haxall's he passed Peck's division, which, after having prepared the road to Harrison, formed the rear-guard of the whole
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book VII:—politics. (search)
and, taking one of the launches, reached Fort Macon safe and sound. On the same day three Federal steamers, leaving Yorktown, in Virginia, with a few companies of infantry, landed these troops for a few hours in one of the bays of Matthews county, on the Chesapeake coast, where they destroyed three schooners and some important saltworks. In the mean time, Foster had received new reinforcements, which enabled him at last to carry out his plan of campaign. Wessell's brigade, detached from Peck's division, which was stationed between Yorktown and Fort Monroe, had come to join him at Newberne, and on the 11th of December he set off with the four brigades placed under his command. This time the preliminaries were complete, and nothing was likely to stop the march of his troops, as had been the case the preceding month. The object of the expedition was difficult to accomplish. Foster proposed to penetrate into the interior of the country, and to cut, in the vicinity of Goldsboroa, t
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), chapter 8 (search)
h compels us to correct a statement relative to General Keyes. He did not arrive on the field of battle at Fair Oaks with Peck's brigade, as we had believed. He was on the ground almost from the commencement of the battle, and some time before the Artillery. 4 Regular batteries, 18 guns. 1st Brigade, Brigadier-general Graham, 5 regiments. 2d Brigade, Brigadier-general Peck, 5 regiments. 3d Brigade, ......, 4 regiments. 2d Division, Brigadier-general W. F. Smith. Artillery. Reyes, 14,610 men strong. 1st Division, Couch. 1st Brigade, Graham; 2d Brigade, .....; 3d Brigade, Howe. 2d Division, Peck. 1st Brigade, Keim; 2d Brigade, Palmer; 3d Brigade, Naglee. 5th corps, Franklin; 19,405 men strong. 1st Division, S 4th corps, Keyes. 1st Division, Couch. 1st Brigade, ......; 2d Brigade, ......; 3d Brigade, Howe. 2d Division, Peck. 1st Brigade, ......; 2d Brigade, Palmer; 3d Brigade, Naglee. 5th corps, Franklin. 1st Division, Slocum. 1st Briga
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), chapter 9 (search)
generals of army corps, divisions and brigades who commanded the Federals on this side, in their reports or depositions before the committee on the conduct of the war relative to this matter: Keyes, half-past 12; Casey, forty minutes after twelve; Naglee, about one o'clock. 2d. Couch's division was engaged before the attack of G. W. Smith, his advance having taken position in front of Seven Pines since two o'clock for the purpose of supporting Casey (Keyes' report). Two of his brigades, Peck's and Devens', had been brought into line since half-past 3 o'clock (Naglee's report). It was whilst the latter were engaged on the Nine Mile road that, about half-past 4 o'clock, Johnston, at the head of G. W. Smith's troops, swept down upon Abercrombie's brigade, the third of Couch's division, at Fair Oaks, which rendered it necessary for the Federals to make a change of front (Keyes' report). Shortly after, at five or a quarter-past five o'clock, this attack broke the line which had thus b