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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for John J. Peck or search for John J. Peck in all documents.

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ing reenforced by the second and third lines, the enemy again advanced upon the works, and, by overpowering numbers, leaped the works into the ditch, and came to a hand-to-hand fight. Our brave men, being thus so greatly outnumbered, were compelled to yield. Some surrendered, others rushed to the pontoon and escaped, some others, being cut off from that, plunged into the river below and swam across, a few being drowned; General Hayes escaped after he had surrendered; Colonels Monaghan and Peck swam the river. More than half this brigade are missing. The extreme right of General Hoke's brigade fought with equal valor, and shared a similar fate. The possession of the works held by the Louisianians gave the enemy possession of the pontoon-bridge, and thus cut off General Hoke's brigade from any escape, except by swimming. Our extreme right being thrown back, the brave Colonel Godwin, although surrounded on all sides, except on the river-side, still fought on, and when compelled to
litary stores, and another, in July, against Rocky Mount, on Tar River, which destroyed the bridge at that place and a large amount of rebel property, terminate the military operations in that State to the present time. On being compelled to abandon his attempt upon Washington, the rebel General Hill marched toward Nansemond to reenforce Longstreet, who was investing Suffolk. Failing in his direct assaults upon this place, the enemy proceeded to establish batteries for its reduction. General Peck made every preparation for defence of which the place was capable, and started the construction of his works, till finally, the attempt was abandoned. Our loss in these operations was forty-four killed, two hundred and two wounded, and fourteen missing. We captured four hundred prisoners and five guns during the siege. As Suffolk possessed no advantages as a military post, and was not susceptible of a good defence, the garrison was afterwards withdrawn within the new lines constructed
and Clark Thornton, of company D, of the same regiment; John Powers, Sergeant-Major of the Thirty-fifth Indiana, as worthy of special observation. To my staff I call the attention of the General in command. We had to dismount and go on foot in storming Lookout. The transportation of orders over its rugged sides in the face of the enemy was one of great danger and labor, but the energy of my intrepid Acting Adjutant-General, Captain J. Rowan Boone; of my untiring aids, Lieutenants Phipps, Peck, and Riley; of my Provost-Marshal, Lieutenant Pepoom; and of Brigade Inspector, Captain North, enabled me to overcome it all, and, through their assistance, I was enabled to handle my brigade in the manner I desired. Not an order was sent that was not swiftly carried and as swiftly executed. I deem it due Warren C. Gallehue, of the Eighty-fourth Indiana, and William Spears, of the Fortieth Ohio, and Joseph Long, orderlies of my staff, to recommend them for promotion for gallantry. Quarte
To the right, on the bank of the Neuse, is Fort Stephenson, while to the left, on the opposite bank of the Trent, stands Fort Gaston. A strong breast-work runs in either direction to the rivers, thus linking all their forts together. Fort Totten is in a central commanding position. While it renders all approach from the west impossible, it commands the city and both rivers. From the tavern, every point about Newbern is visible. Brigadier-General Palmer, who commands in the absence of General Peck, his staff, a few other officers, and, by special favor, the writer, (your correspondent,) were inside the fort, carefully watching the movements of the enemy. They could be seen with a glass, and sometimes with the naked eye, passing back and forth in the edge of the woods skirting the plain on the west. The Twelfth New-York cavalry, under Colonel Savage, were out as scouts. The most gratifying feature of their service was to bring in the companies of the Eighty-ninth New-York volunte
Doc. 89.-retaliation in North-Carolina. The following correspondence passed between Generals Peck and Pickett: Headquarters of the army, and District of North-Carolina, Newbern, Northcarolina, Feb. 11, 1864. Major-General Pickett, Department of Virginia and North-Carolina, Confederate Army, Petersburgh: General: I haenders to justice, I shall refrain from executing a rebel soldier until I learn your action in the premises. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, John J. Peck, Major-General. Reply of General Pickett. headquarters of the Department of North Carolina, Petersburgh, Virginia, February 16, 1864. Major-General JoMajor-General John J. Peck, U. S. A., Commanding at Newbern: General: Your communication of the eleventh of February is received. I have the honor to state in reply, that the paragraph from a newspaper inclosed therein, is not only without foundation in fact, but so ridiculous that I should scarcely have supposed it worthy of consideration; b
Doc. 115.-raid of Stuart's cavalry on the Orange and Alexandria Railroad. Washington, Dec. 16, 1863. Lieutenant Peck, of the Second regiment District volunteers, gives the particulars of a bold raid made by Stuart's cavalry, last night, upon the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, about one mile and a half beyond Fairfax Station. The rebels, about eight hundred strong, and accompanied by the notorious Mosby, at six o'clock attacked the guard upon the railroad at that point, which consisted of company I, of the One Hundred and Fifty-fifth New-York regiment The company made a brave resistance, and were only captured by the cavalry entirely surrounding them. The rebels had previously cut the telegraph wires, but word was conveyed as quickly as possible to Colonel Drew, in command of a battalion of four companies of the Second District of Columbia volunteers, at Fairfax Station, and he started with his command to reinforce the attacked. The progress of the train was stopped