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ied through cleaning up the dinner dishes and stepped over to neighbor S .... to see if his wife Peggy was as well as mout be expected, and hear what they called the baby. Well, when I got there andn out that Shields is a Democrat, I never will -- Jefferson! Jefferson! What do you want, Peggy? Do get through your everlasting clatter some time, and bring me a gourd of water; the child'fellow, after all, once you get at the foundation of him. I walked into the house, and, Why, Peggy, says I, declare we like to forgot you altogether. Oh, yes, says she, when a body can't help he calves, and wring the contrary ones' tails for 'em, and no thanks to nobody. Good evening, Peggy, says I, and so I sloped, for I seed she was mad at me for making Jeff neglect her so long. ; and yet it's pretty plain if some change for the better is not made, it's not long that either Peggy or I or any of us will have a cow left to milk, or calf's tail to wring. Yours truly, Re
ny; the ladies, in particular, endeavoring to imitate all the airs and graces of the sex—the only drawback being a little hoarseness of the voice, and now and then the use of an expletive, which would escape them when something went wrong in the dance, and they forgot they had the aprons on. The favorite dancingtunes were those of Wapping and Wide Water Street, and when I speak of the airs and graces, I must be understood to mean those rather demonstrative airs and graces, of which Poll and Peggy would be likely to be mistresses of. On these occasions, the discipline of the ship was wont to be purposely relaxed, and roars of laughter, and other evidences of the rapid flight of the jocund hours, at other times entirely inadmissible, would come resounding aft on the quarter-deck. Sometimes the recreation of the dance would be varied, and songs and story-telling would be the amusements of the evening. The sea is a wide net, which catches all kinds of fish, and in a man-of-war's crew
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 4: the Valley of the Shenandoah (continued)—Return to Strasburg. (search)
t no more of her until the confusion of our departure, when Peggy came to say,-- I'm gwine wid ye. Very well, I replied people won't mind our writings. Yase, it will, insisted Peggy; you jes gib me writina. Persuaded by her importunity, Ier over immediately one colored child, the daughter of said Peggy; and this on the pains and perils of disobedience. Then PePeggy passed out of my mind; for new rumors came that Jackson was about attempting to seize the gap-road across the mountains, columns were hurrying along the road, my eyes fell upon my Peggy, keeping Ilp with the artillery, the wagons, and the columnn papers as bearing, when she ran away from the subscriber, Peggy was fleeing from slavery, clinging to our guns and to the cfor this was what we practically had become. I did not see Peggy again for two or three days; for hardly had we arrived at eknowledge, and so gathered such comforts as were at hand. Peggy, my faithful negro woman, duly installed as cook, gave more
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 6: battle of Winchester (continued)—Federal retreat across the Potomac to Williamsport. (search)
last of our command had crossed, and there were never more grateful hearts in the same number of men, says Banks, Banks's Report. than when we stood on the opposite shore. I certainly can speak for one grateful heart, that of my colored woman Peggy, who with her child I passed among the first across the swollen river to a land of freedom. Across the Potomac! Yes, we were again where, in July of the preceding year, we had made our march so gayly into Virginia. One more campaign was endrdon will proceed at once to Washington, and report to the Secretary of War for further orders. By command of N. P. Banks, M. G. C. The next day, therefore, I returned to Washington, carrying with me on her way to her new home my negro woman Peggy and her child. Before I could purchase tickets for the woman, I was compelled to give a bond to save the Philadelphia, Wilmington, and Baltimore Railroad harmless from any lawful claims that might be hereafter brought against it by the owner of
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Index (search)
Colonel, Rebel officer, 220, 233. Newtown (Va.), the scene of a hot fight between Federal and Confederate troops in Banks's flight to Winchester, 207, 208. General Gordon's retreat from, 217, 218. P Patterson, General, commands Federal forces in Civil War, 23. Relieved by General Banks, 29, 30. Entreats his three-months men to remain for further service, 33. Payments to Rebels not in arms for supplies taken, 25. Some cases of refusal of, 34, 35. Peabody, Lieutenant, 229. Peggy, a slave, experiences of, 168. 169, 173. At last reaches the land of freedom, 247, 260. Pelouze, Major, 300, 316. Perkins, S. G., Lieutenant, of the Second Massachusetts, killed at Cedar Mountain, 332. Perkins, Major, adjutant-general to Banks, 172. Urges Banks to action, at Strasburg, without effect, 192. In battle of Ccdar Mountain, 299, 316, 317. Philbrick, Captain, commands a company in the Fifteenth Massachusetts, 65. Is implicated in movements leading to the disaster at
fore 15 Ap. 1730. 3. John, s, of Thomas (2), m. Mehetabel Eaton at Framingham where he had Mehetabel, b. 26 Jan. 1725-6, m.——Gates; Mary, b. 27 July 1728, m. Amos Gates 28 Nov. 1744; John, b. 22 May 1730; Lydia, b. 24 Dec. 1731, m. Ralph Hemenway 7 Jan. 1752; Thomas, b. 1 Ap. 1734; Ruth, b. 3 Mar. 1736, m. Peter Rice. John the f d. 19 May 1762; his w. Mehetabel d. Mar. 1777. 4. John, s. of John (3), resided at Framingham, m. Margaret Farrar 27 Mar. 1751, and had John, b. 12 Feb. 1752; Peggy, b. 17 Mar. 1754, m. Abel Stone, and (2d) John Jones; Joshua, b. 20 Feb. 1756; Mary, b. 10 July 1758, m. Luther Stone; Martha, b. 8 Feb. and d. 6 May 1772; Daniel, b. 1 Feb. 1764; Martha, b. 7 Oct. 1766, m. Dr. Gambell of Amherst; Nelly, b. 7 and d. 18 Feb. 1769; Lydia, b. 4 Oct. 1770, d. young; Nelly, twin, b. 4 Oct. 1770, m. Aaron P. Edgell. John the f. was a Colonel Selectman, and Treasurer; he d. 22 May 1807, a. 77; his w. Margaret d. 6 Mar. 1774. 5. John, s. of John (4), was of Fram
fore 15 Ap. 1730. 3. John, s, of Thomas (2), m. Mehetabel Eaton at Framingham where he had Mehetabel, b. 26 Jan. 1725-6, m.——Gates; Mary, b. 27 July 1728, m. Amos Gates 28 Nov. 1744; John, b. 22 May 1730; Lydia, b. 24 Dec. 1731, m. Ralph Hemenway 7 Jan. 1752; Thomas, b. 1 Ap. 1734; Ruth, b. 3 Mar. 1736, m. Peter Rice. John the f d. 19 May 1762; his w. Mehetabel d. Mar. 1777. 4. John, s. of John (3), resided at Framingham, m. Margaret Farrar 27 Mar. 1751, and had John, b. 12 Feb. 1752; Peggy, b. 17 Mar. 1754, m. Abel Stone, and (2d) John Jones; Joshua, b. 20 Feb. 1756; Mary, b. 10 July 1758, m. Luther Stone; Martha, b. 8 Feb. and d. 6 May 1772; Daniel, b. 1 Feb. 1764; Martha, b. 7 Oct. 1766, m. Dr. Gambell of Amherst; Nelly, b. 7 and d. 18 Feb. 1769; Lydia, b. 4 Oct. 1770, d. young; Nelly, twin, b. 4 Oct. 1770, m. Aaron P. Edgell. John the f. was a Colonel Selectman, and Treasurer; he d. 22 May 1807, a. 77; his w. Margaret d. 6 Mar. 1774. 5. John, s. of John (4), was of Fram
Historic leaves, volume 3, April, 1904 - January, 1905, Gregory Stone and some of his descendants (search)
stant cousin of Samuel, was the ancestor of Hon. William H. Kent, one of the mayors of Charlestown. Joseph Kent died May 30, 1753, in his seventy-ninth year, and was the father of nine children. In his will there is mention of seventy-four acres at Winter Hill, bounded, east, by a rangeway; west, by Peter Tufts; etc. Besides several smaller parcels, he left to his son Samuel sixteen acres, bought of N. Hayward, near Winter Hill, and the use of twelve acres of wood. He bequeathed his negro Peggy to his daughter Mehitabel; Venus to his daughter Rebecca; Jenny to his son Benjamin; and Violet to his son Stephen. The will of his widow, probated 1762, mentions her negro girl Jane. Samuel, the fifth child, born July 18, 1714, lived and died probably on what is now Somerville avenue. The family homestead is still standing above the Middlesex Bleachery, near Kent street. Mr. Kent was a blacksmith, and, like his father, held various town offices, including that of selectman. Wyman's inv
. Oakes, Edward, 76, 79. oburne (Woburn), 83. Odin House, The, 38. Olin, John, Jr., 65. Old England, 27. Old Powder House, 47, 87. Old South Church, 30. Old State House, 4. Outline of Study of Somerville History, 60, 61. Oxbow, 2. Oyster Bay, N. H., 37. Paige, —, 51, 73. Palestine, 50. Parker, Benjamin, 16. Parker, Captain, John, 71. Parker, Rev., Theodore, 71. Parkman, Dr., Samuel, 38. Paul Revere's Ride, 60. Payne, Edward, Master, 51. Payson, Samuel, 68. Peggy, 88. Perry, Hon. A. A., 42. Philip, King, 86. Phillips, Elizabeth, 18. Phillips, Henry, 12. Phipps, Frances, 68. Phipps, John, 68. Phipps, Joseph, 16, 68. Phipps Street, Charlestown, 18, 90. Pierce, —, 29. Pierce, Augusta Smith, 71. Pierce, James, 16. Pierce, John, 71. Pierce, Sarah, 71. Pierce, William, 32. Pigeon, John, 88. Plymouth, Mass., 30. Poor (family), 42. Portsmouth, N. H., 21, 37. Pound, The, 24. Powder House, 20, 31. Prentice, Rev., Thomas, 45. Prosp
ton, prob. Nehemiah (1), m. Elizabeth Hall, of W. Camb., 29 Sept. 1811. Elizabeth, prob. she, d. 12 Dec. 1822, a. 58. Endor m. Lydia Adams, 27 Aug. 1818; he d. here 23 Mar. 1835, a. 40. Eliakim—died in Lincoln 13 Apr. 1835, a. 70 about—Damon. M. A., from Lexington, d. 5 Dec. 1842, a. 28. Sa-Rah, m. Ebenezer Robbins, 8 June, 1775. Martha, of Lexington, m. Edward Waldron, Jr., of Sterling, 23 Sept. 1794. Elizabeth d. 4 May, 1809, a. 69. The name is occasionally Estabrooks. Everett, Peggy, and John Norcross, m. 8 Aug. 1799. Wil-Liam, of Bedford, and Anna C. Dickson of Camb., m. 31 July, 1823. F Faloon, Daniel, and Mrs. Hannah Lincoln, m. 3 Nov. 1837. Farmer, Nathaniel, and Hannah Fessenden, both of Lexington, m. 28 May, 1755. Life m. Elizabeth A. Locke, 1 Nov. 1835; their s. Kimball, bap. 13 June, 1842, in private, being sick. (Elizabeth A. Farmer d. 4 Aug. 1851, a. 35.) Kimball d. 9 July, 1841, a. 51. See Cutter (par. 62). Farnsworth, Mary, d.—Nov. 1827, a. 61.<
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