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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Virginia, (search)
verly......June 3, 1861 Gen. P. G. T. Beauregard proclaims to the people of Loudoun, Fairfax, and Prince William counties that the Federals are warring for beauty and booty ......June 5, 1861 Virginia troops transferred to the Confederate government by the governor......June 8, 1861 Affair at Big Bethel, near Fortress Monroe......June 10, 1861 General Patterson crosses the Potomac at Williamsport......July 2, 1861 Affair at Rich Mountain, W. Va.; the Confederates under Col. George H. Pegram defeated by the Federals under General Rosecrans......July 11, 1861 Battle at Carricksford, W. Va.; Confederates defeated, with the loss of their general, Robert S. Garnett......July 14, 1861 Battle of Bull Run......July 21, 1861 General Patterson relieves Gen. Nathaniel P. Banks in command of the Department of the Shenandoah......July 25, 1861 Maj.-Gen. George B. McClellan appointed to the Army of the Potomac......July 27, 1861 Holding or accepting office under the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.30 (search)
South Carolina, commissioned Brigadier-General of Cavalry, February 23, 1865, to report to General Robert E. Lee, with rank to date from February 15, 1865, was the youngest officer of the rank in the Confederate States Army. Another youthful commander is in evidence, General William R. Johnson Pegram, whose signature was W. J. Pegram. He was born in Petersburg, Va., in 1841; grandson of General Wm. R. Johnson, the Napoleon of the turf, son of General James W. Pegram, and nephew of Colonel Geo. H. Pegram, the Confederate commander of the battle of Rich Mountain. W. J. Pegram left the study of law at the University of Virginia in April, 1861, and enlisted as a private in F Company, of Richmond, Va. Willie Pegram was of small stature and wore glasses, but he was every inch a soldier, and born to command. While in camp at Fredericksburg, Va., in May, 1861, he was elected a lieutenant of the Purcell Battery of Artillery, commanded by Captain R. Lindsay Walker (subsequently Brigadier-G