hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 44 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 48 results in 8 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Chickamauga-letter from Captain W. N. Polk. (search)
ith his corps to Lafayette, and General Polk to Lee and Gordon's mill, and Major-General Buckner, with the Army of East Tennessee, and Major-General Walker, with his division from the Army of Mississippi, to concentrate at Lafayette, and Brigadier-General Pegram to cover the railroad with his cavalry. These dispositions having been made of the Confederate forces, Major-General Crittenden, commanding the left wing of Rosecrans's army, which had not moved with the right and centre, but had been lious night, crossed Hunt's ford about 7 A. M., and took post in the rear of Walker's position of the day previous, from which Walker had moved to take post on Hood's right. Forest, under orders direct from army headquarters, moved at dawn with Pegram's division to reconnoitre in the direction of the roads leading west from Reed's bridge, and struck a brigade that had gone out in like observation, under direction of General Thomas. Forrest, with characteristic promptness, attacked the brigade
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Kirby Smith's campaign in Kentucky. (search)
Confederate army at this time was about forty-eight thousand men, It would be impossible to recall, at this distance of time, the exact dates at which the different bodies of Confederate troops entered the State of Kentucky, or their exact numbers. But the following table will show with sufficient accuracy the order in which our army crossed the Tennessee line, as well as the estimates of the infantry forces, as I obtained them at the time, by my somewhat petinacious enquiries, from General Pegram, who, although without official reports, was necessarily, from his position, obliged to keep well informed. For fear of exaggeration I have rather reduced his estimates, as I now recall them: 1862.    August 13,General Kirby Smith's column6,000  August 14,General Heth's division3,000  August 25,General Reynold's brigade3,000  September 6,General Bragg's army23,000  September 7,Colonel Grace's regiment600  September 12,General Marshall's brigade4,000  September 18,General
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of the crater, July 30, 1864. (search)
d capturing the whole of Beauregard's army. Pegram's salient, where four guns, under Captain PegrCaptain Pegram of Richmond, forming part of Major Coit's battalion, was in the centre of Elliott's brigade. The Halifax, Virginia, four 12-pounder Napoleons; Pegram's, of Petersburg, Virginia, four 12-pounder NaA, when the mine was exploded, was occupied by Pegram's battery, four guns. The battery to the left A, the right being in a gorge line in rear of Pegram's battery, and the left extending to or near t The night before the explosion I remained in Pegram's battery until 12 o'clock, at which time all there was a gradual ascent from the ravine to Pegram's battery, Wright's guns were enabled to sweeps lines to the salient, the gun detachments of Pegram's battery were required to be awake and ready obably not upon the scene until the arrival of Pegram's artillery, which was brought from the right e death of their comrades. Two of the guns of Pegram's battery were by the explosion thrown over be[2 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Artillery on the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
, it moved with General Pender's division into the line of battle. One battery of Napoleon's (Captain Rice), and a section of Whitworth's, was placed first in position a short distance to the right of the turnpike, by the side of a portion of Major Pegram's battalion, and fire was opened slowly upon the enemy, whenever they brought into view considerable bodies of troops, and occasionally upon their batteries. The Whitworth guns were used to shell the woods to the right of the town. After a sition in haste, a fine opportunity was also afforded at this time of enfilading a heavy column of the enemy. Infantry formed in the railroad cut, and along a line of fence, which was employed to advantage by my batteries, in connection with Major Pegram's, and the enemy entirely discomfited disappeared from the field. Previous to this time I had advanced two of my batteries to the intervening hollow, and followed close upon the enemy as he left the hills. No further movement was made during
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Artillery on the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
er the battle had been in progress for several hours. On reaching the scene of action, as directed, I halted my battalion in column on the side of the road and awaited further orders. After a delay of about an hour, I received a message from Major Pegram, requesting that I relieve one of his batteries whose ammunition had become exhausted. I accordingly sent him Captain V. Maurin, of the Donaldsonville battery, with six of my rifle pieces, which almost immediately opened upon the enemy with ahem in the rear, when Major Richardson, by opening upon them with his nine rifles, succeeded in diverting their fire. On the third day Major Richardson was ordered to the position held by Major-General Anderson's division, and to the right of Major Pegram's battalion. Towards the close of the day, in obedience to orders from General Longstreet, he placed his guns in position under fire at this point, but did not fire a single shot, having received orders to that effect. The remaining six guns
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 5.44 (search)
John B. Ashcraft, William G. Morris. Majors: John G. Bryan, Charles N. Hickerson, William R. Rankin, John B. Ashcraft, William G. Morris, O. N. Brown, Jackson L. Bost. Adjutants: William T. Nicholson, David W. Oates. Quartermasters: Robert M. Oates, Miles P. Pegram. Commissaries: Herbert DeLambert Stowe, Miles P. Pegram. Surgeons: James Hickerson, George E. Trescot. Assistant Surgeons: J. W. Tracy, J. B. Alexander, G. B. Moffitt, Daniel McL. Graham. Chaplain: A. L. Stough. John B. Ashcraft, William G. Morris. Majors: John G. Bryan, Charles N. Hickerson, William R. Rankin, John B. Ashcraft, William G. Morris, O. N. Brown, Jackson L. Bost. Adjutants: William T. Nicholson, David W. Oates. Quartermasters: Robert M. Oates, Miles P. Pegram. Commissaries: Herbert DeLambert Stowe, Miles P. Pegram. Surgeons: James Hickerson, George E. Trescot. Assistant Surgeons: J. W. Tracy, J. B. Alexander, G. B. Moffitt, Daniel McL. Graham. Chaplain: A. L. Stough.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 9.91 (search)
ade August 9th, according to his report of Cedar Run or Slaughter Mountain, and in Thomas's brigade August 30th, according to Surgeon Guild's report of casualties. 35th Georgia. 45th Georgia. 49th Georgia. Artillery. Lieutenant-Colonel R. L. Walker. Braxton's Virginia Battery, (Fredericksburg Artillery.) Crenshaw's Virginia Battery. Davidson's Virginia Battery, (Letcher Artillery.) Latham's North Carolina, (Branch Artillery.) McIntosh's South Carolina Battery, (Pee Dee Artillery.) Pegram's Virginia Battery, (Purcell Artillery.) Ewell's division. Major-General R. S. Ewell. Brigadier-General A. R. Lawton. Lawton's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. A. R. Lawton. Colonel M. Douglass. 13th Georgia. 26th Georgia. 31st Georgia. 38th Georgia. 60th Georgia. 61st Georgia. Early's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. J. A. Early. 13th Virginia. 25th Virginia. 31st Virginia. 44th Virginia. 49th Virginia. 52d Virginia. 58th Virginia. Hays's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. Harry T. Hays. Colonel Henry Forno
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lane's Corps of sharpshooters. (search)
William G. Morris. Majors.—John G. Bryan, Charles N. Hickerson, William R. Rankin, John B. Ashcraft, William G. Morris, O. N. Brown, Jackson L. Best. Adjutants.—William T. Nicholson, David B. Oates. Quartermasters.—Robert M. Oates, Miles P. Pegram. Commissaries.—Herbert DeLambert Stowe, Miles P. Pegram. Surgeons.—James Hickerson, George E. Trescot. Assistant Surgeons.—J. W. Tracy, J. B. Alexander, G. B. Moffitt, Daniel McL. Graham. Chaplain.—A. L. Stough. James H. Lanlliam G. Morris. Majors.—John G. Bryan, Charles N. Hickerson, William R. Rankin, John B. Ashcraft, William G. Morris, O. N. Brown, Jackson L. Best. Adjutants.—William T. Nicholson, David B. Oates. Quartermasters.—Robert M. Oates, Miles P. Pegram. Commissaries.—Herbert DeLambert Stowe, Miles P. Pegram. Surgeons.—James Hickerson, George E. Trescot. Assistant Surgeons.—J. W. Tracy, J. B. Alexander, G. B. Moffitt, Daniel McL. Graham. Chaplain.—A. L.