Your search returned 825 results in 251 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragrpahs. (search)
s wrested from its grasp by a flank and rear movement of the enemy's cavalry, which alone considerably outnumbered Early's whole army. Indeed, as one looks out on this beautiful landscape, every hill, and valley, and stream, and hamlet, seems redolent with memories of those stirring movements by which Winchester changed hands no less than eighty-three times during the war, and we can almost see Johnston, Jackson, Stuart, Ewell, Ashby, A. P. Hill, Early, Breckinridge, Gordon, Rodes, Ramseur, Pegram, and other chieftians leading their brave men to the onset. How appropriate that, amid such scenes as these, a monument should be reared to the unknown and unrecorded dead of the rank and file who followed these splendid leaders. But above all, there stands hard by the heroic old town of Winchester, whose people, from 1861 to 1865, threw open their doors to the Confederate soldier, and esteemed it a sweet privilege to share with him their last crust of bread, and whose noble women were
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Official diary of First corps, A. N. V., while commanded by Lieutenant-General R. H. Anderson, from May 7th to 31st, 1864. (search)
road and is ordered to move at the same hour. Order of march: Field, Kershaw and Pickett. We go into bivouac between Hundley's Corner and Walnut Grove church. May 29th Morning quiet. In the afternoon the enemy is reported advancing, and the troops are put under arms. Field is. partly moved out, but returns and sends two regiments to fill with skirmishers the interval between Early's corps and Breckinridge. May 30th Early extends to the right, and attacks the enemy's left with Pegram's brigade. Pickett starts to support the movement by going through the breastworks, but soon abandons it and is put on Early's left. Field on his left and Kershaw on the left of the corps. May 31st Kershaw is taken out of line, and about 3 P. M. is sent to relieve the right of Early, the whole of whose corps is finally relieved by us, he taking our entrenchments. Kershaw moves down towards Gaines' mill in the endeavor to connect with Hoke. Pickett takes the right of Early's old lin
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General J. B. Gordon's report of battle of Hatcher's Run. (search)
he fighting on the west side of Hatcher's run on the 6th instant. On the morning of that day, Pegram's division moved out from camp to reconnoitre--one brigade moving near the run and the other farance. Gordon's division, Brigadier-General Evans commanding, sent forward in support, formed on Pegram's left, charged and drove the enemy before it, but was finally forced by superior numbers to retire. It was readily reformed near the enemy's lines, and again advanced with spirit while Pegram charged on the right. The enemy was again driven back; but General Pegram, who was riding immediatelyGeneral Pegram, who was riding immediately with his troops, being killed, and Colonel Hoffman, commanding brigade, severely wounded, a portion of the line was thrown into confusion. The battle had been obstinately contested for several hours, when Mahone's division arrived, and was placed in position to fill a gap between Evans and Pegram. The whole line now advanced to the attack, and drove the enemy in confusion to his works along the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
by General Jackson to send a brigade to the support of Taliaferro, who was in line of battle on the right of the main road. Thomas was sent on this duty, and formed his line immediately in front of Taliaferro's. Lieutenant-Colonel Walker placed Pegram's and Fleet's batteries in eligible positions in front of Early's brigade (General Taliaferro's right). Branch, Archer and Pender, as they came up, were successively formed on the left of the road. Winder's brigade, immediately in front of Brancents standing firm, the Fourteenth and Twenty-first Virginia and Twelfth Georgia. Thomas formed his line of battle along a fence bordering a corn-field, through which the enemy were advancing. After a short contest, the enemy were hurled back. Pegram's and Fleet's batteries, the latter under command of Lieutenant Hardy, did heavy execution this day, and drove back several attempts to capture their guns. The Fourteenth Georgia, under the gallant Folsom, having been separated from the rest of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
within one hundred and fifty yards of the works, and were sheltered as much as possible from the fire of the enemy. At dawn, Lieutenant-Colonel Walker opened a rapid enfilade fire from all his batteries, at about one thousand yards' range. The enemy replied vigorously. In an hour, the enemy's fire seeming to be pretty well silenced, the batteries were ordered to cease, and this was the signal for storming the works. General Pender had commenced his advance, when the enemy again opening, Pegram and Crenshaw were run forward to within four hundred yards, and quickly coming into battery, poured in a damaging fire. The enemy now displayed a white flag, and Lieutenant Chamberlayne was sent in to know if they had surrendered. Sharpsburg--By direction of General Jackson, I remained at. Harper's Ferry until the morning of the 17th, when, at half-past 6 A. M., I received an order from General Lee to move to Sharpsburg. Leaving Thomas with his brigade to complete the removal of the cap
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
e. The execution of the first movement was entrusted to Brigadier-General Pender, who accomplished it with slight resistance; and during the night Lieutenant-Colonel Walker, Chief of Artillery of Hill's division, brought up the batteries of Captains Pegram, McIntosh, Davidson, Braxton and Crenshaw, and established them upon the position thus gained. Branch and Gregg also gained the positions indicated for them, and daybreak found them in rear of the enemy's line of defence. * * * * * * In an hour the enemy's fire seemed to be silenced, and the batteries of General Hill were ordered to cease their fire, which was the signal for storming the works. General Pender had commenced his advance, when the enemy again opening, Pegram and Crenshaw moved forward their batteries, and poured a rapid fire into the enemy. The white flag was now displayed, and shortly after. wards Brigadier-General White (the commanding officer, Colonel D. S. Miles, having been mortally wounded), with a garrison
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Gettysburg. (search)
he division was moved to the left about a quarter of a mile, and in the same order of battle was formed in the rear of Major Pegram's battalion of artillery, which was posted on the crest of a high hill, the ground between us and the enemy being liketant General: Major — On the morning of July 2d, my brigade was placed in position before Gettysburg in the rear of Major Pegram's battery of artillery, in an open field, with woods on my right and left flanks. My position was to the right of the a message, informing forming him of my position. He then ordered me to fall back to my original position in the rear of Pegram's battery. On the 3d, my brigade was held in reserve to support the battery in my front. The list of casualties has alrights of 2d and 3d of July, the brigade was posted in line of battle immediately in front of the enemy, and in support of Pegram's batteries. In this front its skirmishers were quite constantly engaged, and inflicted much loss upon the enemy; and af
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gettysburg. (search)
with their divisions. With Major McIntosh's and Major Pegram's battalions of this corps, which was under the command of Captain Brunson until I was joined by Major Pegram, who assumed command on the 30th June at Cashtowaging party for the purpose of securing horses. Major Pegram's and Major McIntosh's battalions moved forward ry of Garnett's battalion, which relieved one of Major Pegram's batteries, whose ammunition had been expended. On the 2d the battalions of Pegram, McIntosh, Lane and a part of Garnett's battalion under Major Richardsohorses, which were sent for them. Three guns of Major Pegram's battalion were disabled in action and sent to the loss of Lieutenant Morris, Ordnance Officer of Pegram's battalion, who was killed on the morning of the 1n the left of Anderson's division, and not far from Pegram's battalion, and on the right of these and in fronteing necessarily separated, that part of it next to Pegram's position, consisting of three of Wyatt's and two
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gettysburg. (search)
rd, and passed the division of General Heth, then under command of Brigadier-General Pettigrew, which seemed much exhausted and greatly reduced by several hours of hard and successful fighting. General Lane, on the extreme right, being annoyed by a heavy force of dismounted cavalry on his right flank, which kept up a severe enfilade fire, was so much delayed thereby, that he was unable to attack the enemy in front, except in routing a force posted in the woods, occupied the next day by Major Pegram's battalion of artillery. Colonel Perrin, after passing General Heth's division, took advantage of a ravine to reform his line, and moved rapidly forward, preserving an alignment with General Scales on his left. Upon ascending a hill in front, this brigade was met by a furious storm of musketry and shell from infantry posted behind temporary breastworks, and artillery from batteries to the left of the road near Gettysburg. The brigade steadily advanced at a charge, reserving its fire
destined to invade the western counties of Virginia. This latter force, having landed at Wheeling on May 26th, advanced as far as Grafton on the 29th. At this time Colonel Porterfield, with the small force of seven hundred men sent forward by Governor Letcher of Virginia, was at Philippi. On the night of June 2d he was attacked by General McClellan, with a strong force, and withdrew to Laurel Hill. Reenforcements under General Garnett were sent forward and occupied the hill, while Colonel Pegram, the second in command, held Rich Mountain. On July 11th the latter was attacked by two columns of the enemy, and after a vigorous defense, fell back on the 12th, losing many of his men, who were made prisoners. General Garnett, hearing of this reverse, attempted to fall back, but was pursued by McClellan, and while striving to rally his rear guard, was killed. Five hundred of his men were taken prisoners. This success left the Northern forces in possession of that region. The dif
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...