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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 80 10 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 46 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 38 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 4 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 26 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 26 2 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 24 2 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 24 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 23 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Pegram or search for Pegram in all documents.

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Retribution.--There was an instance of just retribution for treason at Rich Mountain. The Hon. John Hughes, of Beverley, a member of the Virginia Secession Convention at Richmond, heard by some means that our troops were endeavoring to turn the flank of the rebels. He mounted a horse and sped up the hill rapidly, to carry the information to Col. Pegram. When near the summit he was hailed by pickets. Supposing they were Federal pickets, he cried out, Hold, I am a Northern man. The next instant he fell into the road a corpse, riddled by thirty balls. He had lied, and his own friends, the rebels, whom he was striving to save, believing they were his enemy, put an end to his career.--Louisville Journal, Aug 1.
ect of the Nashville's visit to Europe appears to puzzle Lincoln and his friends to a considerable degree. Certainly there must be something intended of importance, something to damage them, or the undertaking to run the blockade and proceed across the Atlantic would not have been adventured. The taking out of Confederate naval officers, wherewith to supply commanders for first-class frigates to be purchased in Europe, does not seem a perfectly satisfactory explanation. Those who know Captain Pegram would not be surprised to hear of any brilliant achievement being performed by him, of which the Nashville is capable, before he reports himself again to the Navy Department in this city. If the good people of some New England seaport town should wake up one of these fine mornings, and find their homes in flames, they may console themselves with reading of the exploits of one John Paul Jones of the long, long ago. It is now Thursday evening. Last week at the same time I felt very wel