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Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 80 10 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 46 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 38 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 4 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 26 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 26 2 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 24 2 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 24 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 23 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Pegram or search for Pegram in all documents.

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fty-seventh, now commanded by Colonel A. C. Godwin, formerly first provost-marshal of Richmond, was ordered over the river to occupy the extreme left of the breastworks. This brigade crossed the river under a heavy fire of artillery, (for the Louisianians were already sustaining a furious fire from several batteries.) This fire from the artillery and sharp-shooters was kept up until after sunset. The other two brigades of General Early's division, commanded by Brigadier-Generals Gordon and Pegram, were held in position on this side the river. By sunset the enemy had extended his lines, in the form of a half-moon, so as to envelop our forces entirely, his right and left resting on the river above and below. At the same time he had formed three lines of attack, one behind the other, to assault the works held by General Hayes and the right of Hoke's brigade. The sun had gone down when this terrible onset was made. Although the odds were greatly against us, and we had only four piece
Since this severe punishment, the Indians in that quarter have ceased to commit depredations on the whites. Department of the Ohio. In December last, Brigadier-General S. P. Carter made a cavalry raid into Eastern Tennessee and destroyed the Union and Wakuka Railroad bridges, a considerable amount of arms, rolling stock, etc. He returned to Kentucky with the loss of only ten men. On the thirtieth of March, Brigadier-General Gillmore engaged and defeated a large rebel force under General Pegram, near Somerset, Kentucky. Our loss in killed, wounded, and missing was only thirty; that of the enemy is estimated at five hundred. In June, the rebels attempted a raid into Harrison County, Indiana, but were driven back with the loss of sixty-three prisoners. About the same time, Colonel Sanders, with two pieces of artillery, the First Tennessee cavalry, and some detachments from General Carter's command, destroyed the railroad near Knoxville, and the bridges at Slate Creek, Str
ishing already with their lines on the Lenoir road. General Sanders, with the One Hundred and Twelfth Illinois, Forty-fifth Ohio, Eighth Michigan, and Twelfth Kentucky, are in front. The sharp crack of musketry is heard, growing more and more frequent, and the affair is getting serious. The town is filled with rumors of coming rebels. Vaughn, it is said, has crossed the river below, and will attack our positions on the south bank. A. P. Hill is marching with two corps from Virginia, and Pegram, Forrest, and Wheeler are crossing the Watauga toward the Gap, to cut off our retreat and supplies. In the mean time, as an offset, our forage-trains are bringing in corn and hay from eight miles south of the river, and the telegraph north is still working. We are anxious, of course, to know what Longstreet's intentions are. Doubtless, the cooperation of the Virginia forces was one part of his plans; but in this he will probably be disappointed, as the advance of General Meade will, doub