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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 80 10 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 46 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 38 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 4 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 26 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 26 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 24 2 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 24 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 23 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 10, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Pegram or search for Pegram in all documents.

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tween twilight and nine o'clock, the hour of retirement, instrumental music, singing, visiting, smoking, games of chess and cards, served to while away the tediousness of the place. One of the officers who conduces most to enjoyment is Lieut. Col. Pegram, who was captured at Rich Mountain by Gen. McClellan. I may add here, parenthetically, that the General has always acted towards his captive with a generosity characteristic of the thorough-bred soldier. When ill he caused him to be sent ncinnati, where he was nursed by his (McClellan's) wife — secured for him a furlough of several months, with which he might travel for either recreation or health, and placed at his disposal that excellent test of human sincerity — his purse. Col. Pegram, however, nobly declined the two latter privileges, and as soon as he was sufficiently restored, proceeded to Fort McHenry, gave up his parole, and voluntarily again became a prisoner of war. I was about to add before the above digression, tha